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I am solving this problem of rotating an array and got algorithm and code working

 int[] Rotate(int[] ar,int k)
        {
            if (k <= 0 || k > ar.Length - 1)
                return ar;
            Reverse(ar, 0, k - 1);
            Reverse(ar, k, ar.Length - 1);
            Reverse(ar, 0, ar.Length - 1);
            return ar;            
        }

 void Reverse(int[] ar,int start, int end)
        {
            while (start < end)
            {
                int temp = ar[start];
                ar[start] = ar[end];
                ar[end] = temp;
                start++;
                end--;
            }
        }

Now I want to do this in LINQ and I got the below code, I think this can be done much better.

 int[] Rotate(int[] ar,int k)
    {
        if (k <= 0 || k > ar.Length - 1)
            return ar;
        int[] ar1=ar.Take(k-1).Reverse().ToArray();
        int[] ar2=ar.Skip(k - 1).Take(ar.Length - k+1).Reverse().ToArray();
        int[] ar3 = ar1.Concat(ar2).Reverse().ToArray();
        return ar3;
    }

This is a well known algorithm from Programming pearls - http://books.google.com/books?id=kse_7qbWbjsC&lpg=PA14&ots=DfzTzQCSar&dq=rotate%20an%20array%20programming%20pearls&pg=PA14#v=onepage&q&f=false

And in general how to develop my LINQ skills, if I am given a programming problem, right now I am only thinking in for loops or foreach loops, how to think in terms of linq operators. I am reading C# 4.0 nutshell, other than practicing any advice?

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This is extension method syntax. LINQ syntax would start with from .... –  Marcelo Cantos Sep 3 '10 at 23:18
    
Yes, but using LINQ to refer to lambdas/Enumerable...I fear that cat is well out of the bag. :( –  Kirk Woll Sep 3 '10 at 23:19
2  
@Marcelo Cantos, what you're referring to is called the query comprehension syntax. There is no such thing as "LINQ syntax". –  Thomas Levesque Sep 3 '10 at 23:37
1  
@Marcelo Cantos - those extension methods are in the System.Linq namespace. –  David B Sep 4 '10 at 3:03
    
@Thomas: Thank you for pointing that out; I stand corrected. I always thought LINQ applied specifically to query syntax, but reading up on MSDN indicates otherwise. –  Marcelo Cantos Sep 4 '10 at 11:00
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Starting with your code:

int[] ar1=ar.Take(k-1).Reverse().ToArray(); 
int[] ar2=ar.Skip(k - 1).Take(ar.Length - k+1).Reverse().ToArray(); 
int[] ar3 = ar1.Concat(ar2).Reverse().ToArray(); 

Since you just want to get all of the remaining elements, the Take in the second line isn't needed.

ar1 and ar2 are just enumerated, so they don't need to be arrays. The ToArray calls aren't needed. With a bit of creative renaming thrown in, we have:

IEnumerable<int> revFirst = ar.Take(k-1).Reverse(); 
IEnumerable<int> revLast = ar.Skip(k-1).Reverse(); 
int[] ar3 = revFirst.Concat(revLast).Reverse().ToArray(); 

Now we have

rev ( rev(first) + rev(last) )

distributing the outer rev gives

rev ( rev(last) ) + rev ( rev(first) )

which is the same as

last + first

applying the same operations to the code gives

IEnumerable<int> first = ar.Take(k-1); 
IEnumerable<int> last = ar.Skip(k-1); 
int[] ar3 = last.Concat(first).ToArray(); 

which further simplifies to

int[] ar3 = ar.Skip(k-1).Concat(ar.Take(k-1)).ToArray(); 

and now we have Jon Skeet's answer so we must be done.

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I love that you know you're done when your answer matches Jon's. –  RichK Sep 4 '10 at 14:33
    
Wonderful explanation! Thanks for going over my answer and Jon's answer and deriving his from mine, great effort! –  satyajit Sep 4 '10 at 19:49
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I'm not sure why you've got all the reversals, to be honest. How about this:

int[] Rotate(int[] ar,int k)
{
    if (k <= 0 || k > ar.Length - 1)
        return ar;
    return ar.Skip(k)            // Start with the last elements
             .Concat(ar.Take(k)) // Then the first elements
             .ToArray();         // Then make it an array
}

Here's a short but complete program to demonstrate it:

using System;
using System.Linq;

class Test
{
    static int[] Rotate(int[] ar,int k)
    {
        if (k <= 0 || k > ar.Length - 1)
            return ar;
        return ar.Skip(k)            // Start with the last elements
                 .Concat(ar.Take(k)) // Then the first elements
                 .ToArray();         // Then make it an array
    }

    static void Main()
    {
        int[] values = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
        int[] rotated = Rotate(values, 3);

        Console.WriteLine(string.Join(", ", rotated));
    }
}

Output: 4, 5, 1, 2, 3

EDIT: I've just noticed one major difference between my code and your original: yours modifies the original array - mine returns a new array with the rotated values. So would your LINQ code, but it means if you were testing my code with something that only looked at the original array, you wouldn't see the rotation.

LINQ is designed to work this way in general - it favours returning a new sequence over modifying an existing one.

share|improve this answer
    
This is not rotating the array for me, its just returning the original array. Just checked in the IDE. –  satyajit Sep 3 '10 at 23:33
    
@satyajit: Then you're not using it properly. I'll add a short but complete program to show it working. –  Jon Skeet Sep 4 '10 at 8:37
    
Yeah I now understood that your code is returning a new array. Thanks for taking time to explain to me! –  satyajit Sep 4 '10 at 19:47
    
With a Rotateleft extension method I was able to write a little 2D rotate: ar.RotateLeft(up).Select(row => row.RotateLeft(left).ToArray()).ToArray() so much nicer than the non linq version I wrote. –  Dolphin Jan 15 at 6:26
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