Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

So, say I had the following script:

var hey = {
    foo: 1,
    bar: 2,
    baz: 3,
    init: function(newFoo){
        this.foo = newFoo;
        return this;
    }
}
hey.check = function(){
    alert('yeah, new function');
}

Basically, I can call new hey.init(999) and get a new hey variable with hey.foo set to 999. But when I do that, hey.init(999).check() is no longer defined. Is there a way to mimic the script, but allow new hey's to have the extended variables/functions?

EDIT: changed hey.check() to hey.init(999).check() sorry about that...

share|improve this question
    
your hey is an object, not a class that you can instantiate object from, I edited my answer below with the syntax I believe you wanted to code. –  aularon Sep 3 '10 at 23:22
    
seems to be working..maybe the problem is someplace else or the question needs to be rephrased –  Andreas Sep 3 '10 at 23:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you are doing is not actually getting a new hey instance, but a hey.init instance, which only contains foo property.

I think this is what are you trying to do:

var hey =function() {
    this.foo = 1;
    this.bar = 2;
    this.baz = 3;
    this.init = function(newFoo){
        this.foo = newFoo;
    }
}
hey.check = function(){
    alert('yeah, new function');
}


//now instantiating our class, and creating an object:
var heyInstance=new hey();
heyInstance.init(999);
alert(heyInstance.foo);
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. So, if I wanted to return the hey instance after running init, I can't just return this, because this would refer to init. How would I return the parent this of init? –  Azmisov Sep 3 '10 at 23:38
    
Actually, you can do return this; and this will be referring to heyInstance. but when you did new hey.init() in your sample code, that this was referring to hey.init instance, since then what you instantiated was hey.init and not hey –  aularon Sep 4 '10 at 0:26
    
Okay, so I just ran a quick test with your code and heyInstance.check() is undefined. I guess it has to be hey.prototype.check instead of hey.check. But is hey.prototype cross browser compatible? Say, IE6 and FF2? –  Azmisov Sep 4 '10 at 1:38
    
Yes, hey.prototype is cross browser, it's a JavaScript core syntax. –  aularon Sep 4 '10 at 6:44

It works for me...

When I paste

var hey = {
    foo: 1,
    bar: 2,
    baz: 3,
    init: function(newFoo){
        this.foo = newFoo;
        return this;
    }
}
hey.check = function(){
    alert('yeah, new function');
}
console.log(hey);
hey.init(22);
console.log(hey);
hey.check();

into Firebug's console, I end up with an alert from hey.check(); and the second log shows an object where foo == 22.

What's not working on your end?

share|improve this answer
    
It doesn't work when I run hey.init(22).check(). –  Azmisov Sep 3 '10 at 23:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.