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It's for a game of checkers. See revision history for older versions of code.

    private static Move GetBestMove(Color color, Board board, int depth)
    {
        var bestMoves = new List<Move>();
        var validMoves = board.GetValidMoves(color);
        int highestScore = int.MinValue;
        Board boardAfterMove;
        int tmpScore;
        var rand = new Random();

        Debug.WriteLine("{0}'s Moves:", color);

        foreach (var move in validMoves)
        {
            boardAfterMove = board.Clone().ApplyMove(move);

            if(move.IsJump && !move.IsCrowned && boardAfterMove.GetJumps(color).Any())
                tmpScore = NegaMax(color, boardAfterMove, depth);
            else
                tmpScore = -NegaMax(Board.Opposite(color), boardAfterMove, depth);

            Debug.WriteLine("{0}: {1}", move, tmpScore);

            if (tmpScore > highestScore)
            {
                bestMoves.Clear();
                bestMoves.Add(move);
                highestScore = tmpScore;
            }
            else if (tmpScore == highestScore)
            {
                bestMoves.Add(move);
            }
        }

        return bestMoves[rand.Next(bestMoves.Count)];
    }

    private static int NegaMax(Color color, Board board, int depth)
    {
        var validMoves = board.GetValidMoves(color);
        int highestScore = int.MinValue;
        Board boardAfterMove;

        if (depth <= 0 || !validMoves.Any())
            return BoardScore(color, board);

        foreach (var move in validMoves)
        {
            boardAfterMove = board.Clone().ApplyMove(move);

            if(move.IsJump && !move.IsCrowned && boardAfterMove.GetJumps(color).Any())
                highestScore = Math.Max(highestScore, NegaMax(color, boardAfterMove, depth));
            else
                highestScore = Math.Max(highestScore, -NegaMax(Board.Opposite(color), boardAfterMove, depth - 1));
        }

        return highestScore;
    }

    private static int BoardScore(Color color, Board board)
    {
        if (!board.GetValidMoves(color).Any()) return -1000;
        return board.OfType<Checker>().Sum(c => (c.Color == color ? 1 : -1) * (c.Class == Class.Man ? 2 : 3));
    }

I'm trying it with depth 0, and the scores are correct for about half the game, and then all of a sudden it starts screwing up. One of the players will start proclaiming his score is higher than it really is. Why would it only work for half a game?!

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Right now this is a maximax. For the oponent you need to aim for min score. Also you rather not use floats, you can use ints intead with values multiplied with 2 (floats are slower and not precise) –  Imre L Sep 4 '10 at 6:27
    
@lmre: didn't think the implications of using a float would have much of effect, but i guess if this is running a few billion times, it can add up. –  Mark Sep 4 '10 at 23:29

2 Answers 2

Interesting approach, the first time I see MaxiMax. But I see a problem here:

var minMove = GetBestMove(... board.Clone().ApplyMove(move), ...);
float score = ... BoardScore(color, board.Clone().ApplyMove(minMove));

In this code, move and minMove are moves for different sides and yet you apply them equally at the same level here. The second line should be something like:

float score = ... BoardScore(... board.Clone().ApplyMove(move).ApplyMove(minMove));

You can of course store and re-use the board.Clone().ApplyMove(move) part.

But then you still loose information: At Depth 100 you filter out the best boardScore at depth 99 but you don't have/use anything from levels 98..0 except when there was no move (null), but as you noticed yourself that part goes wrong.

Tried looking at some pseudo algorithms, but all the seem to return a score. That confuses me, because I don't really want to get a score back, I want to get a Move back.

Still, that is the way to go. The main result from a tree-search is the value of the best branch. The move itself is only essential at the root level. Leave it until you start implementing alpha/beta, then you will be able to store the best branch in a single table.

I would advice switching to a regular NegaMax,
also see this SO question.

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"In this code, move and minMove are moves for different sides and yet you apply them equally at the same level here." It's supposed to find the best move for the opposite player, and then it computes the score for the current player, which would presumably become lower if the other guy made a good move... but then I maximize this score... does that mean I'm actually assuming the player will make a bad move because I'm maximizing the wrong thing? I'll take a look at NegaMax when I get a chance tomorrow. Thanks. –  Mark Sep 4 '10 at 23:34
    
"But then you still loose information: At Depth 100 you filter out the best boardScore at depth 99 but you don't have/use anything from levels 98..0" -- Isn't it the score in the end that I care about? Assuming both players make the best move throughout, you want to maximize the end state, not anything in between? –  Mark Sep 4 '10 at 23:36
    
Is your Move class actually a complete Branch ? –  Henk Holterman Sep 5 '10 at 9:56
    
And I was using your count-down depth, from the code you don't use the endstate values. –  Henk Holterman Sep 5 '10 at 10:01
    
No... a Move basically just has a start and end position, and the color of the checker that made the move. –  Mark Sep 5 '10 at 17:47
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Found the bug: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3653670/what-could-cause-this-to-start-miscalculating-after-awhile/3653855#3653855

New code:

private static Move GetBestMove(Color color, Board board, int depth)
{
    var bestMoves = new List<Move>();
    IEnumerable<Move> validMoves = board.GetValidMoves(color);
    int highestScore = int.MinValue;
    Board boardAfterMove;
    int tmpScore;
    var rand = new Random();

    Debug.WriteLine("{0}'s Moves:", color);

    foreach (Move move in validMoves)
    {
        boardAfterMove = board.Clone().ApplyMove(move);

        if (move.IsJump && !move.IsCrowned && boardAfterMove.GetJumps(color).Any())
            tmpScore = NegaMax(color, boardAfterMove, depth);
        else
            tmpScore = -NegaMax(Board.Opposite(color), boardAfterMove, depth);

        Debug.WriteLine("{0}: {1}", move, tmpScore);

        if (tmpScore > highestScore)
        {
            bestMoves.Clear();
            bestMoves.Add(move);
            highestScore = tmpScore;
        }
        else if (tmpScore == highestScore)
        {
            bestMoves.Add(move);
        }
    }

    return bestMoves[rand.Next(bestMoves.Count)];
}

private static int NegaMax(Color color, Board board, int depth)
{
    IEnumerable<Move> validMoves = board.GetValidMoves(color);
    int highestScore = int.MinValue;
    Board boardAfterMove;

    if (depth <= 0 || !validMoves.Any())
        return BoardScore(color, board);

    foreach (Move move in validMoves)
    {
        boardAfterMove = board.Clone().ApplyMove(move);

        if (move.IsJump && !move.IsCrowned && boardAfterMove.GetJumps(color).Any())
            highestScore = Math.Max(highestScore, NegaMax(color, boardAfterMove, depth));
        else
            highestScore = Math.Max(highestScore, -NegaMax(Board.Opposite(color), boardAfterMove, depth - 1));
    }

    return highestScore;
}

private static int BoardScore(Color color, Board board)
{
    if (!board.GetValidMoves(color).Any()) return -1000;
    return board.OfType<Checker>().Sum(c => (c.Color == color ? 1 : -1) * (c.Class == Class.Man ? 2 : 3));
}

I'm not 100% convinced this works perfectly. It seems to work for depth 0, and usually for depth 1... beyond that, I have no idea what the computer is thinking. Still doesn't appear to play super intelligently.

Edit: Running this and max speed... NegaMax agent vs Random. NegaMax always wins. Watching the scores for occurrences of "1000". He always wins within a few turns after that, so it does appear to be working, finally!

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