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Why does this fail to compile? (g++-4.5)

template < typename U >
static void h () {
}

int main () {
  auto p = &h<int>; // error: p has incomplete type
}

EDIT: Here is a work-around:

template < typename U >
static void h () {
}

int main () {
  typedef decltype (&h<int>) D;
  D p = &h<int>; // works
}
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1  
Compiles fine on Visual Studio 2010. It's most likely a glitch in GCC. What you could try is decltype(&h<int>) p = &h<int>; –  Puppy Sep 4 '10 at 9:53
    
Works with G++ 4.6 at least. –  Maister Sep 12 '10 at 10:38
    
@DeadMG: Without "auto" there's even no need to typedef, void (*p)() = & h<int>; would also compile. –  doc Sep 12 '10 at 15:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

In C++0x this is guaranteed to work. However in C++03 this wasn't working (the initializer part, that is) and some compilers apparently don't support it yet.

Furthermore, I remember that the C++0x wording is not clear what happens with &h<int> when it is an argument to a function template and the corresponding parameter is deduced (this is what auto is translated to, conceptionally). The intention is, however, that it is valid. See this defect report where they designed the wording, the example by "Nico Josuttis" and their final example.

There is another rule that the wording enforces but compilers are not correctly implementing. For example, see this clang PR.

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It does not compile because type of 'p' is not known to the compiler which is a must in C++ unlike some other languages.

Try

template < typename U > 
static void h () { 
} 

int main () { 
  auto void (*p)() = &h<int>; 
} 
share|improve this answer
1  
The auto keyword is used for automatic type deduction. A C++0x feature. –  dirkgently Sep 4 '10 at 9:39
    
Ok, but in my real code, h takes a lot of other parameters depending on U and other templates, and I don't want to specify them all, as the type of p should be known to the compiler. –  Thomas Sep 4 '10 at 9:40
1  
@dirkgenly: Oh. I am still at C++03 where 'auto' is for automatic variables –  Chubsdad Sep 4 '10 at 9:41
    
the question is probably about the C++ 0x auto which should be able to determine the type automatically, the the "old" "this is a stack variable" - auto. –  peterchen Sep 4 '10 at 9:41
    
Comeau online comiles it fine –  Chubsdad Sep 4 '10 at 9:44

Try

 auto p  = static_cast<void(*)()>(& h<int>);

Because gcc treats templated function as overloaded one. From the gcc's point of view it's like you would have h(int param) and h(float param) - which one the compiler has to choose?

I noticed what was the problem in older versions of gcc, but I'll try to explain it more verbosely. GCC couldn't deduce the type, because templated function was treated like overloaded one. It was basically like you would have the following:

void h(int)
{
}

void h(float)
{
}

void (*p)(int) = & h;  //ok
void (*p)(float) = & h; //ok
auto p = & h; //error: which version of h?

For gcc h<int> was just like overloaded h function with endless alternatives depending onT parameter. With the code provided in question it was O.K. to do the following:

void (*p)() = & h<int>;

(that's why I don't get typedefed "work-around")

As I thought OP wanted to use c++11 auto keyword as suggested by a tag, I statically casted h<int> to void(*)(), which is kind of no-operation, just to trick gcc, because it was not able to deal with templated functions and auto correctly.

Functions void h<int>() and void h<float>() should be of course treated like different functions with the same pointer type and not overload versions of h function. When instantiated they should behave like void hInt() and void hFloat() and you should be able to use auto like here:

void hInt()
{
}

void hFloat()
{
}

auto p = hInt;
p = hFloat;

But for some reason for gcc they were like overloaded versions of h.

Please give a reason for downvotes.

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I am not the downvoter :) Anyhow I am not sure to understand your logic: since you are static_casting to a compile time known type, what's the use for auto? –  Francesco Sep 12 '10 at 10:22
    
@Francesco: without a cast gcc throws an error "statement cannot resolve address of overloaded function". You'll get the same error in case of overloaded function (like void h(int) and void h(float)) in which case compiler is unable to determine which version to choose when it finds & h statement. For some reason (I think it's something with template arguments discovery) templated function is treat in the same way as overloaded one. After I had used static_cast like in a case of overloaded functions it started to compile. auto is used to deduce p type. –  doc Sep 12 '10 at 15:24
    
@Francesco: they got the same result with typedef as with a static_cast. I thought he wanted C++0x auto keyword... –  doc Sep 12 '10 at 15:32
    
I agree that the typedef suffer from the same issue: you must specify by hand the type and so the advantage of automatic type deduction is lost. –  Francesco Sep 13 '10 at 7:21

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