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class A
{
  public void Foo() {}
}

class B extends A
{
}

class C extends B
{
  public void Foo() {}
}

Does C's Foo() override A's even though B did not override it? Or do I have to add a stub in B that calls the super's method for each one I want to override in C?

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Yes this will override A's implementation for instances if C only. Instances of A and B will use A.Foo(). –  dsmith Sep 4 '10 at 15:55
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Even though B did not mention it, Foo should still be available to it due to inheritance. By extension, then, Foo is also available to subclass C and should be able to be overridden thanks to polymorphism.

Instances of C, therefore, will use c.foo() (however it is defined), where as instances of A and B will make use of a.foo() because they have not yet been overridden.

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Presumably then: A a = new C(); a.Foo(); will call C.Foo()? –  PdxAndroidLead Sep 4 '10 at 22:08
1  
Erm, yes, but that's a rather confusing naming convention for your variables. –  Andy Sep 5 '10 at 1:50
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Yes C overrides Foo() of A.

This is due to inheritance, though B doesn't override Foo() , Foo() is inherited from A by B.

And as C extends B, Foo() is inherited by C and overriding happens as C defines Foo().

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