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let's say i have a class A and a class B. B is used as a member in A. B does not have a default constructor but one that requires a parameter.

class B {
  B(int i) {}
};


class A {

 B m_B;

 A()
 {
    m_B(17); //this gives an error
 }

};

how can i still use B as a member in A?

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marked as duplicate by jogojapan, towi, interjay, Neil, Ian Jul 8 '13 at 13:54

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1 Answer

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Use initialization list.

class B {
  public:
    B(int i) {}
};

class A {
    B m_B;
  public:
    A() : m_B(17) {}
};

BTW, to reset m_B somewhere outside of the constructor, the correct syntax is:

m_B = B(17);
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In this example, if that last line m_B = B(17) were called from the A() constructor, does B's default constructor still get invoked? If so, is there a way to prevent this? –  Steven Lu Mar 22 '11 at 5:43
    
@Steven: (1) Yes. (2) Use the initialization list to initialize m_B. –  KennyTM Mar 22 '11 at 5:46
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