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Why are mutable strings slower than immutable strings?

EDIT:

>>> import UserString
... def test():
...     s = UserString.MutableString('Python')
...     for i in range(3):
...         s[0] = 'a'
... 
... if __name__=='__main__':
...     from timeit import Timer
...     t = Timer("test()", "from __main__ import test")
...     print t.timeit()
13.5236170292



>>> import UserString
... def test():
...     s = UserString.MutableString('Python')
...     s = 'abcd'
...     for i in range(3):
...         s = 'a' + s[1:]
... 
... if __name__=='__main__':
...     from timeit import Timer
...     t = Timer("test()", "from __main__ import test")
...     print t.timeit()
6.24725079536


>>> import UserString
... def test():
...     s = UserString.MutableString('Python')
...     for i in range(3):
...         s = 'a' + s[1:]
... 
... if __name__=='__main__':
...     from timeit import Timer
...     t = Timer("test()", "from __main__ import test")
...     print t.timeit()
38.6385951042

i think it is obvious why i put s = UserString.MutableString('Python') on second test.

NOTE: downvotes with no sense, and no comments i will report those downvoters.

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3  
I'm not sure that they are slower. It depends a lot on what you're trying to do with them. Do you have a particular use case in mind? –  Jeremy Friesner Sep 5 '10 at 1:06
2  
They're not, in and of themselves. You need to ask a much more specific question. (In general, mutable strings have the potential to be faster, because you can make changes in-place without copying, but that depends on what you're doing. It's very hard to contrive inherent performance benefits of immutable strings.) –  Glenn Maynard Sep 5 '10 at 2:32
1  
That doesn't even make sense. –  Glenn Maynard Sep 5 '10 at 3:03
1  
"why are they slower?" -> "they're not" -> "prove it". It seems a good idea from here would be for mais1voto to explain why s/he believes they're slower in the first place. –  RHSeeger Sep 5 '10 at 3:44
2  
The question is much better, at least imo, with your examples showing how you're seeing the mutable strings as slower. As a side note, though I didn't downvote the question, it's not against any rules to downvote without an explanation... it's considered good form to include one, but it's not mandatory in any way. –  RHSeeger Sep 5 '10 at 4:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 22 down vote accepted

In a hypothetical language that offers both mutable and immutable, otherwise equivalent, string types (I can't really think of one offhand -- e.g., Python and Java both have immutable strings only, and other ways to make one through mutation which add indirectness and therefore can of course slow things down a bit;-), there's no real reason for any performance difference -- for example, in C++, interchangeably using a std::string or a const std::string I would expect to cause no performance difference (admittedly a compiler might be able to optimize code using the latter better by counting on the immutability, but I don't know any real-world ones that do perform such theoretically possible optimizations;-).

Having immutable strings may and does in fact allow very substantial optimizations in Java and Python. For example, if the strings get hashed, the hash can be cached, and will never have to be recomputed (since the string can't change) -- that's especially important in Python, which uses hashed strings (for look-ups in sets and dictionaries) so lavishly and even "behind the scenes". Fresh copies never need to be made "just in case" the previous one has changed in the meantime -- references to a single copy can always be handed out systematically whenever that string is required. Python also copiously uses "interning" of (some) strings, potentially allowing constant-time comparisons and many other similarly fast operations -- think of it as one more way, a more advanced one to be sure, to take advantage of strings' immutability to cache more of the results of operations often performed on them.

That's not to say that a given compiler is going to take advantage of all possible optimizations, of course. For example, when a slice of a string is requested, there is no real need to make a new object and copy the data over -- the new slice might refer to the old one with an offset (and an independently stored length), potentially a great optimization for big strings out of which many slices are taken. Python doesn't do that because, unless particular care is taken in memory management, this might easily result in the "big" string being all kept in memory when only a small slice of it is actually needed -- but it's a tradeoff that a different implementation might definitely choose to perform (with that burden of extra memory management, to be sure -- more complex, harder-to-debug compiler and runtime code for the hypothetical language in question).

I'm just scratching the surface here -- and many of these advantages would be hard to keep if otherwise interchangeable string types could exist in both mutable and immutable versions (which I suspect is why, to the best of my current knowledge at least, C++ compilers actually don't bother with such optimizations, despite being generally very performance-conscious). But by offering only immutable strings as the primitive, fundamental data type (and thus implicitly accepting some disadvantage when you'd really need a mutable one;-), languages such as Java and Python can clearly gain all sorts of advantages -- performance issues being only one group of them (Python's choice to allow only immutable primitive types to be hashable, for example, is not a performance-centered design decision -- it's more about clarity and predictability of behavior for sets and dictionaries!-).

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I don't know if they are really a lot slower but they make thinking about programming easier a lot of the times, because the state of the object/string can't change. That's the most important property to immutability to me.

Furthermore you might assume that immutable string are faster because they have less state(which can change), which might mean lower memory consumption, CPU-cycles.

I also found this interesting article while googling which I would like to quote:

knowing that a string is immutable makes it easy to lay it out at construction time — fixed and unchanging storage requirements

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with an immutable string, python can intern it and refer to it internally by it's address in memory. This means that to compare two strings, it only has to compare their addresses in memory (unless one of them isn't interned). Also, keep in mind that not all strings are interned. I've seen example of constructed strings that are not interned.

with mutable strings, string comparison would involve comparing them character by character and would also require either storing identical strings in different locations (malloc is not free) or adding logic to keep track of how many times a given string is referred to and making a copy for every mutation if there were more than one referrer.

It seems like python is optimized for string comparison. This makes sense because even string manipulation involves string comparison in most cases so for most use cases, it's the lowest common denominator.

Another advantage of immutable strings is that it makes it possible for them to be hashable which is a requirement for using them for dictionary keys. imagine a scenario where they were mutable:

s = 'a'
d = {s : 1}
s = s + 'b'
d[s] = ?

I suppose python could keep track of which dicts have which strings as keys and update all of their hashtables when a string was modified but that's just adding more overhead to dict insertion. It's not to far off the mark to say that you can't do anything in python without a dict insertion/lookup so that would be very very bad. It also adds overhead to string manipulation.

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The obvious answer to your question is that normal strings are implemented in C, while MutableString is implemented in Python.

Not only does every operation on a mutable string have the overhead of going through one or more Python function calls, but the implementation is essentially a wrapper round an immutable string - when you modify the string it creates a new immutable string and throws the old one away. You can read the source in the UserString.py file in your Python lib directory.

To quote the Python docs:

Note:

This UserString class from this module is available for backward compatibility only. If you are writing code that does not need to work with versions of Python earlier than Python 2.2, please consider subclassing directly from the built-in str type instead of using UserString (there is no built-in equivalent to MutableString).

This module defines a class that acts as a wrapper around string objects. It is a useful base class for your own string-like classes, which can inherit from them and override existing methods or add new ones. In this way one can add new behaviors to strings.

It should be noted that these classes are highly inefficient compared to real string or Unicode objects; this is especially the case for MutableString.

(Emphasis added).

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