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Per this page http://www.eternallyconfuzzled.com/tuts/datastructures/jsw_tut_rbtree.aspx "Top-down deletion" is an implementation of a red-black tree node removal that pro-actively balances a tree by pushing a red node down through the tree so that the leaf node which is being removed is guaranteed to be red. Since the leaf node is guaranteed to be red, you don't have to worry about re-balancing the tree, because deleting a red leaf node doesn't violate any rules and you don't have to perform any additional operations to re-balance and restore red-black'ness.

"Bottom-up deletion" involves doing a normal binary search down the tree to find the node to be deleted, swapping in the leaf node ( if the found node isn't a leaf node), and then restoring the red-black tree properties by climbing back up the tree while fixing red-black rule violations.

Does top-down deletion minimize the number of re-balancing operations? Could it be possible that top-down deletion pro-actively does too many re-colorings and re-balancings on the way down?

What about this scenario: (x) denotes a red node

               8
         _____/ \____
        /            \
       4              12
     /   \          /    \
   2       6      10      14
  / \     / \    /  \    /  \
 1   3   5   7   9  11  13  15
                             \
                            (16)

If I want to delete 16, a bottom-up deletion wouldn't do any rebalancing, but a top-down deletion re-colors the nodes all the way down, before discovering that the recoloring operations were unnecessary:

iteration 1:

              (8)
         _____/ \____
        /            \
       4              12
     /   \          /    \
   2       6      10      14
  / \     / \    /  \    /  \
 1   3   5   7   9  11  13  15
                             \
                            (16)

iteration 2:

               8
         _____/ \____
        /            \
      (4)            (12)
     /   \          /    \
   2       6      10      14
  / \     / \    /  \    /  \
 1   3   5   7   9  11  13  15
                             \
                            (16)

iteration 3:

               8
         _____/ \____
        /            \
      (4)             12
     /   \          /    \
   2       6     (10)    (14)
  / \     / \    /  \    /  \
 1   3   5   7   9  11  13  15
                             \
                            (16)

Then in iteration 4 you discover that you don't need to push down because 16 is already red. So is top-down deletion more time and space efficient?

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Nice ascii art. +1 –  Simucal Dec 13 '08 at 4:16
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2 Answers

From what I gather: "top-down deletion" avoids traversing the same node in a path more than once during the operation. So, given the simple path from the root to a given node, if you're going to do some thing to a node that's in that path anyway, why not just do it on the way down? It avoids having to traverse over parts of the path more than once. Therefore, this saves time.

A similar principle is employed for multiple operations (including insert) in 2-3-4 trees (a special sub-case of a,b-trees)

Does top-down deletion minimize the number of re-balancing operations?

Think that, in the average case, it does. Because you make it potentially easier to insert something afterward with few re-balancing operations.

Could it be possible that top-down deletion pro-actively does too many re-colorings and re-balancings on the way down?

Maybe, but that depends on the data set. However, as mentioned above. This may reduce the number of re-colorings and re-balancings overall.

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Is top-down more space efficient than bottom-up?

In a word, yes. The top-down algorithm presented at eternally confuzzled does not need parent pointers on the nodes. Bottom-up algorithms are presented with a tradeoff between time and space: parent pointers allow for some short-circuiting when re-balancing after insertion and deletion.

For example, OpenJdk-7's implementation of Red-black trees has parent pointers, which allows it to choose whether or not a re-balance is necessary after a deletion (such as in your scenario).

Is top-down more time efficient than bottom-up?

In general, yes: The top-down approach must only traverse the once tree per operation, while the bottom approach must traverse the tree twice per operation. As I mentioned earlier, bottom up approaches can shave off some time by using parent-pointers. But definitely not a whole tree-traversal every time.

Both implementations may also choose to utilize threading to improve the time or space required to iterate through the entire tree. This requires the overhead of a flag or two per node. This can also be achieved using parent pointers, but not as efficiently. NB: the threading link says threading is not as efficient as parent pointers, but this only applies to bottom-up trees (which the book covers).

Anecdotal evidence

Back in college, we implemented eternally confuzzled's top-down red-black tree in C++ and did a comparison with our STL's (bottom-up) implementation of std::map. Our top-down approach was definitely faster—I want to say it was easily 2x faster on all mutating operations. Searching was faster, too, but I cannot say if it was due to a more balanced tree or less complex code.

Sadly, I no longer have the code, nor the writeup.

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thanks for answering my bounty call for more attention to this question! Eternally confuzzled's bottom-up insertion and deletion algorithms also manage without parent pointers, precisely because they are stored on the stack when recursing down. Sure, the stack use is a different space use, even if the nodes are lighter without parents. –  u0b34a0f6ae Nov 7 '11 at 11:01
    
There's also an evidence contrary to this. E.g.: gedare-csphd.blogspot.cz/2011/08/… He claims that he found bottom-up approach to be faster. –  mnicky Dec 17 '12 at 10:36
    
Good to know! That makes me believe my implementation was faster than std::map's because the code was much simpler. –  Michael Deardeuff Dec 18 '12 at 4:00
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