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I am trying to say $level > -100 && $level < 100

$level  = 0;

                switch($level){                                                                                       

                case $level > -100:                                                                                   
                break;
                case $level <  100:                                                                                   
                break;
                default:
                echo '5';
                return null;                                                                                          
                }              

can you use a switch statement like this.

share|improve this question
    
Check my answer. It is possible using Switch. But I have to tell you, it is not a Good use of Switch. –  Starx Sep 5 '10 at 15:52
    
See my comment to nikic's answer –  Mchl Sep 5 '10 at 17:27
    
I don't see how the proposed switch construct approximates (($level > -100) && ($level < 100)). You have 3 cases, the first of which catches -99, the second of which catches -110, and the third of which (default) is never called. –  Peter Oct 3 '12 at 21:32

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

None of the answers presented so far have explicitly connected the spirit of the original question with a proper switch construction. So, for the record:

switch (true) {
    case (($level>-100) && ($level<100)):
        echo 'in range one';
    case (($level>200) && ($level<300)):
        echo 'in range two';
    default:
        echo 'out of range';
}

There's absolutely nothing wrong with this usage of switch.

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When you say switch ($level) you're already comparing the value of $level. Each case can then only check for equality, you can't do comparisons like in your example. You'll have to use an if statement instead:

if ($level > -100 && $level < 100)
  ; // do nothing; equivalent of break in this case
else
  echo '5';

Even simpler, just negate the conditions:

if ($level <= -100 || $level >= 100)
  echo '5';
share|improve this answer

Apart of if/else, another way to do it:

switch (true)                                                                               
    case $level > -100:
        break;
    case $level <  100:
        break;
    default:
        echo '5';
        return null;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This isn't really same as $level > -100 && $level < 100. Consider $level = -200. It will not break on first case, but will break on second one. Actually echo 5; line will never be reached. –  Mchl Sep 5 '10 at 17:23
    
@Mchl - You're right, but this is actually a bug in the original question. The answer from NikiC is syntactically correct, and is presumably what the asker was wanting to do. –  Peter Oct 3 '12 at 21:33

The other answers are both correct and incorrect at the same time. Incorrect, in that it is possible to do what you want in PHP... change switch($level) to switch(true) and your example will work. Correct, in that it's bad form and if any other programmers see that in your code they'll probably come after you with pitchforks. Its not how the switch statement is intended to be used, and wouldn't work like that in most other languages.

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3  
I think thats interesting. The fact you can set the switch to true and evaluate for it is clearly intentional. It also when you think about it makes perfect sense. What I would not call it is intuiative.Alas it does seem a case resulting in raptors falling from the sky. –  James Andino Sep 5 '10 at 15:52
    
I don't agree that switch(true) is bad form in PHP. It is true that some other languages (like Java) don't support the switch(true) syntax. But plenty of languages do support similar constructions (including Perl, Groovy, and Go), so you can't really make the argument that "nobody else does this, so neither should you". And I claim that when properly used it can actually make PHP code at least as easy to read as a chain of if/then elses. –  Peter Oct 3 '12 at 22:03

No you can't. Switch does only 'equals' type comparison.

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Feeling better now? –  Mchl Sep 5 '10 at 17:44
    
+1 because it's definatly not -1 –  NikiC Sep 5 '10 at 19:45

No, you can't. The switch statement needs literals in the case blocks. Use an if statements instead:

if(!($level > -100 && $level < 100))
{
  echo '5';
  return null;
}
share|improve this answer
    
how can level be less than -100 and more than 100? –  David_001 Sep 5 '10 at 15:06
    
meh, wrong rollback. thanks –  Femaref Sep 5 '10 at 15:07

This is one of the reasons people advocating case as a superior solution to if-else are off base. I don't like the syntax or the limitations - if-ifelse-else is much more useful.

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this doesn't help with the question at all. –  Femaref Sep 5 '10 at 15:09
    
Neither one is "superior" to the other; each has its own uses. In this case, an if statement wins. –  casablanca Sep 5 '10 at 15:10
    
Right tools for right job... –  Mchl Sep 5 '10 at 15:13
    
my apples can beat up your oranges. –  James Andino Sep 5 '10 at 15:55
    
It's just argumentive. Both statements have their merits. –  Femaref Sep 5 '10 at 16:08

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