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Let us say i have

File1.c:

#include<stdio.h>
#include"File2.c"

void test(void)
{
sum(1,2);
}

int main(void)
{
int sum(int a,int b);
test();
sum(10,20);
return 0;
}

=========================

File2.c:

int sum(int x,int y)
{
printf("\nThe Sum is %d",x+y);
}

=========================

Now as far as my understanding goes test() calling sum() should give a Compile-Time Error since i have made/declared sum() local to main, which i am not getting, and the program is running fine without any errors.

My main purpose is to define sum in File2.c and make it local to main() so that no other function has visibility to this function sum().

Where am i going wrong?

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There's an implicit extern in front of the declaration of sum() inside main(). With your code as written, test() 'sees' the definition of test() because it appears in the translation unit before test() does. If only main() is to see sum() then one file must contain main() and static int sum(...){...}. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 5 '10 at 16:57
    
Why do you want to make the sum function visible only for main, if you're calling it from test, too? Are you planning to have 2 sum functions (with different purposes)? –  Cristian Ciupitu Sep 5 '10 at 17:07
    
@Cristian Ciupitu: Xaero doesn't want to call sum from test; it's just an example to show that it's not giving a compilation error. –  jamesdlin Sep 5 '10 at 18:24
1  
In C (unlike C++): does not require functions to be declared before use. The compiler will happy to generate the appropriate function call stuff then the linker will link resolve the names latter. Note if in test() you do sum( 1.2 , 2.4) you will get very funky results as the compiler will push doubles onto the stack (not integers) and yet the linker will still correctly link the code. If you performed sum( 1.2, 2.4) in main() then the doubles will be converted into ints before being pushed to the stack (as the main function knows that sum() is expecting integers). –  Loki Astari Sep 5 '10 at 19:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Prototypes are helpful when compiling as they tell the compiler what a function's signature is. They are not a means of access control, though.

What you want to do is put sum() into the same source file as main() and give it static linkage. Declaring it static means it will only be available in that one .c file, so functions in other source files will be unable to call it.

Then move test() to another source file. That'll let main() call test() but not let test() call sum() since it's now in a different source file.

File1.c

#include <stdio.h>

/* NO! Do not #include source files. Only header files! */
/*** #include "File2.c" ***/

/* Prototypes to declare these functions. */
static int sum(int a, int b);
void test(void);

int main(void)
{
    test();
    sum(10, 20);
    return 0;
}

/* "static" means this function is visible only in File1.c. No other .c file can
 * call sum(). */
static int sum(int x, int y)
{
    printf("\nThe Sum is %d", x + y);
}

File2.c

void test(void)
{
    /* Error: sum() is not available here. */
    sum(1, 2);
}

Notice, by the way, that I commented out the line #include "File2.c". You should never use #include for .c source files, only for .h header files. Instead you will be compiling the two source files separately and then linking them together to make the final program.

How to do that depends on your compiler. If you're using an IDE like Visual C++ on Windows then add the two source files to a project and it will take care of linking them together. On Linux you'd compile them with something like:

$ gcc -o test File1.c File2.c
$ ./test
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Shouldn't the prototype have static in front as well like this? static int sum(int a, int b); –  al-Acme Sep 5 '10 at 17:23
    
static only has meaning at the implementation of the function. Prototypes are never externally visible (i.e. visible to other .c files), they only tell the compiler "When you are ready to link together an executable, a function called sum that looks like this will be available." –  Clueless Sep 5 '10 at 18:44
    
Xaero is correct; Clueless is, well, clueless. It's invalid (the compiler should issue a diagnostic message) to omit static in the prototype if the function will later be defined static. –  R.. Sep 5 '10 at 19:56
  1. Mark the function as static (this makes it local to the current translation unit).

  2. For the love of god, do not include .c files! (read me)

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1  
Just marking the function static won't help unless Xaero also changes which files contain the definitions of sum and test. –  jamesdlin Sep 5 '10 at 18:25

You have included File2.c in File1.c, so the sum function is defined in File1.c. Remove that line and things should work (you will have to #include <stdio.h> in File2.c).

Note that most compilers will accept an implicit definition of the sum() function as used in test() unless they are in strict mode. For example, calling gcc File1.c File2.c will succeed with no errors. If you want to see all the warnings available, call gcc -Wall -pedantic File1.c File2.c which will warn you that sum is implicitly defined in test() and that your implementation of sum() doesn't return an int. Even then it will compile successfully and run.

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