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When I load an image frome the media gallery into a Bitmap, everything works fine, except that pictures that were shot with the camera while holding the phone vertically, are rotated so that I always get a horizontal picture even though it appears vertical in the gallery. Why is that and how can I load it correctly?

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13 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Have you looked at the EXIF data of the images? It may know the orientation of the camera when the picture was taken.

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You're right, that was of course the solution. I'm gonna post my code as an example in a separate answer, later, but I mark this one as accepted because it got me on the right track. –  Manuel Sep 8 '10 at 21:39
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So, as an example...

First you need to create an ExifInterface:

ExifInterface exif = new ExifInterface(filename);

You can then grab the orientation of the image:

orientation = exif.getAttributeInt(ExifInterface.TAG_ORIENTATION, 1);

Here's what the orientation values mean: http://sylvana.net/jpegcrop/exif_orientation.html

So, the most important values are 3, 6 and 8. If the orientation is 6, for example, you can rotate the image like this:

Matrix matrix = new Matrix();
matrix.postRotate(90);
rotatedBitmap = Bitmap.createBitmap(sourceBitmap, 0, 0, sourceBitmap.getWidth(), sourceBitmap.getHeight(), matrix, true);

That's just a quick example, though. I'm sure there are other ways of performing the actual rotation. But you will find those on StackOverflow as well.

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3  
Here are all the rotation values for the different orientations: 3: 180, 6: 90, 8: 270 –  Seppl Mar 5 '12 at 11:31
32  
Don't use magic numbers when you can use named constants: ExifInterface.ORIENTATION_NORMAL, ExifInterface.ORIENTATION_ROTATE_90, ExifInterface.ORIENTATION_ROTATE_180, ExifInterface.ORIENTATION_ROTATE_270. –  d60402 Mar 31 '13 at 20:20
7  
Watch out of OutOfMemoryError when use this approach as you hold two bitmaps in memory at the same time. –  Alex Bonel Sep 11 '13 at 14:09
4  
9re posted this util class gist.github.com/9re/1990019 –  keithyip Sep 20 '13 at 15:17
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This is a full solution (found in the Hackbook example from the Facebook SDK). It has the advantage of not needing access to the file itself. This is extremely useful if you are loading an image from the content resolver thingy (e.g. if your app is responding to a share-photo intent).

public static int getOrientation(Context context, Uri photoUri) {
    /* it's on the external media. */
    Cursor cursor = context.getContentResolver().query(photoUri,
            new String[] { MediaStore.Images.ImageColumns.ORIENTATION }, null, null, null);

    if (cursor.getCount() != 1) {
        return -1;
    }

    cursor.moveToFirst();
    return cursor.getInt(0);
}

And then you can get a rotated Bitmap as follows. This code also scales down the image (badly unfortunately) to MAX_IMAGE_DIMENSION. Otherwise you may run out of memory.

public static Bitmap getCorrectlyOrientedImage(Context context, Uri photoUri) throws IOException {
    InputStream is = context.getContentResolver().openInputStream(photoUri);
    BitmapFactory.Options dbo = new BitmapFactory.Options();
    dbo.inJustDecodeBounds = true;
    BitmapFactory.decodeStream(is, null, dbo);
    is.close();

    int rotatedWidth, rotatedHeight;
    int orientation = getOrientation(context, photoUri);

    if (orientation == 90 || orientation == 270) {
        rotatedWidth = dbo.outHeight;
        rotatedHeight = dbo.outWidth;
    } else {
        rotatedWidth = dbo.outWidth;
        rotatedHeight = dbo.outHeight;
    }

    Bitmap srcBitmap;
    is = context.getContentResolver().openInputStream(photoUri);
    if (rotatedWidth > MAX_IMAGE_DIMENSION || rotatedHeight > MAX_IMAGE_DIMENSION) {
        float widthRatio = ((float) rotatedWidth) / ((float) MAX_IMAGE_DIMENSION);
        float heightRatio = ((float) rotatedHeight) / ((float) MAX_IMAGE_DIMENSION);
        float maxRatio = Math.max(widthRatio, heightRatio);

        // Create the bitmap from file
        BitmapFactory.Options options = new BitmapFactory.Options();
        options.inSampleSize = (int) maxRatio;
        srcBitmap = BitmapFactory.decodeStream(is, null, options);
    } else {
        srcBitmap = BitmapFactory.decodeStream(is);
    }
    is.close();

    /*
     * if the orientation is not 0 (or -1, which means we don't know), we
     * have to do a rotation.
     */
    if (orientation > 0) {
        Matrix matrix = new Matrix();
        matrix.postRotate(orientation);

        srcBitmap = Bitmap.createBitmap(srcBitmap, 0, 0, srcBitmap.getWidth(),
                srcBitmap.getHeight(), matrix, true);
    }

    return srcBitmap;
}
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what does that MAX_IMAGE_DIMENDION means? –  Hissain Nov 9 '13 at 19:51
2  
It's the maximum width or height of the image you get. I.e. Say you only need a 512x512 image, if you open a 24 megapixel image it is much more efficient to open it already subsampled than to open the whole thing and then scale it down - that would probably exhaust all your memory anyway. –  Timmmm Nov 10 '13 at 21:05
    
In my programs I found it useful to define the Bitmap variable in the activity/fragment as private static and setting it to null in the functions. Had less memory troubles then. –  Gunnar Bernstein Mar 24 at 9:43
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Solved it in my case with this code using help of this post:

            Bitmap myBitmap = getBitmap(imgFile.getAbsolutePath());

            try {
                ExifInterface exif = new ExifInterface(imgFile.getAbsolutePath());
                int orientation = exif.getAttributeInt(ExifInterface.TAG_ORIENTATION, 1);
                Log.d("EXIF", "Exif: " + orientation);
                Matrix matrix = new Matrix();
                if (orientation == 6) {
                    matrix.postRotate(90);
                }
                else if (orientation == 3) {
                    matrix.postRotate(180);
                }
                else if (orientation == 8) {
                    matrix.postRotate(270);
                }
                myBitmap = Bitmap.createBitmap(myBitmap, 0, 0, myBitmap.getWidth(), myBitmap.getHeight(), matrix, true); // rotating bitmap
            }
            catch (Exception e) {

            }
            ImageView img = (ImageView) findViewById(R.id.imgTakingPic);
            img.setImageBitmap(myBitmap);

Hope it saves someone's time!

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Image getting blurrr –  Umesh Feb 21 at 9:29
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You can just read the path from sd card and do the following code...it'll Replace the existing photo after rotating it..

Not: Exif doesnt work on most of the devices, it gives the wrong data so it's good to hard code the rotating before saving to any degree you want to,You just have to change the angle value in postRotate to any you want to.

    String photopath = tempphoto.getPath().toString();
    Bitmap bmp = BitmapFactory.decodeFile(photopath);

    Matrix matrix = new Matrix();
    matrix.postRotate(90);
    bmp = Bitmap.createBitmap(bmp, 0, 0, bmp.getWidth(), bmp.getHeight(), matrix, true);

    FileOutputStream fOut;
    try {
        fOut = new FileOutputStream(tempphoto);
        bmp.compress(Bitmap.CompressFormat.JPEG, 85, fOut);
        fOut.flush();
        fOut.close();

    } catch (FileNotFoundException e1) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e1.printStackTrace();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

}
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This works, but probably not the best way to do it, but it might help someone.

String imagepath = someUri.getAbsolutePath();
imageview = (ImageView)findViewById(R.id.imageview);
imageview.setImageBitmap(setImage(imagepath, 120, 120));    

public Bitmap setImage(String path, final int targetWidth, final int targetHeight) {
    Bitmap bitmap = null;
// Get exif orientation     
    try {
        ExifInterface exif = new ExifInterface(path);
        int orientation = exif.getAttributeInt(ExifInterface.TAG_ORIENTATION, 1);
        if (orientation == 6) {
            orientation_val = 90;
        }
        else if (orientation == 3) {
            orientation_val = 180;
        }
        else if (orientation == 8) {
            orientation_val = 270;
        }
    }
        catch (Exception e) {
        }

        try {
// First decode with inJustDecodeBounds=true to check dimensions
            final BitmapFactory.Options options = new BitmapFactory.Options();
            options.inJustDecodeBounds = true;
            BitmapFactory.decodeFile(path, options);

// Adjust extents
            int sourceWidth, sourceHeight;
            if (orientation_val == 90 || orientation_val == 270) {
                sourceWidth = options.outHeight;
                sourceHeight = options.outWidth;
            } else {
                sourceWidth = options.outWidth;
                sourceHeight = options.outHeight;
            }

// Calculate the maximum required scaling ratio if required and load the bitmap
            if (sourceWidth > targetWidth || sourceHeight > targetHeight) {
                float widthRatio = (float)sourceWidth / (float)targetWidth;
                float heightRatio = (float)sourceHeight / (float)targetHeight;
                float maxRatio = Math.max(widthRatio, heightRatio);
                options.inJustDecodeBounds = false;
                options.inSampleSize = (int)maxRatio;
                bitmap = BitmapFactory.decodeFile(path, options);
            } else {
                bitmap = BitmapFactory.decodeFile(path);
            }

// Rotate the bitmap if required
            if (orientation_val > 0) {
                Matrix matrix = new Matrix();
                matrix.postRotate(orientation_val);
                bitmap = Bitmap.createBitmap(bitmap, 0, 0, bitmap.getWidth(), bitmap.getHeight(), matrix, true);
            }

// Re-scale the bitmap if necessary
            sourceWidth = bitmap.getWidth();
            sourceHeight = bitmap.getHeight();
            if (sourceWidth != targetWidth || sourceHeight != targetHeight) {
                float widthRatio = (float)sourceWidth / (float)targetWidth;
                float heightRatio = (float)sourceHeight / (float)targetHeight;
                float maxRatio = Math.max(widthRatio, heightRatio);
                sourceWidth = (int)((float)sourceWidth / maxRatio);
                sourceHeight = (int)((float)sourceHeight / maxRatio);
                bitmap = Bitmap.createScaledBitmap(bitmap, sourceWidth,     sourceHeight, true);
            }
        } catch (Exception e) {
        }
        return bitmap;
    }
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Use the following code to rotate an image correctly:

private Bitmap rotateImage(Bitmap bitmap, String filePath)
{
    Bitmap resultBitmap = bitmap;

    try
    {
        ExifInterface exifInterface = new ExifInterface(filePath);
        int orientation = exifInterface.getAttributeInt(ExifInterface.TAG_ORIENTATION, 1);

        Matrix matrix = new Matrix();

        if (orientation == ExifInterface.ORIENTATION_ROTATE_90)
        {
            matrix.postRotate(ExifInterface.ORIENTATION_ROTATE_90);
        }
        else if (orientation == ExifInterface.ORIENTATION_ROTATE_180)
        {
            matrix.postRotate(ExifInterface.ORIENTATION_ROTATE_180);
        }
        else if (orientation == ExifInterface.ORIENTATION_ROTATE_270)
        {
            matrix.postRotate(ExifInterface.ORIENTATION_ROTATE_270);
        }

        // Rotate the bitmap
        resultBitmap = Bitmap.createBitmap(bitmap, 0, 0, bitmap.getWidth(), bitmap.getHeight(), matrix, true);
    }
    catch (Exception exception)
    {
        Logger.d("Could not rotate the image");
    }
    return resultBitmap;
}
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You can merge all the if conditions together to have a smaller code. –  Chandranshu Nov 12 '13 at 8:58
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Use a Utility to do the Heavy Lifting.

9re created a simple utility to handle the heavy lifting of dealing with EXIF data and rotating images to their correct orientation.

You can find the utility code here: https://gist.github.com/9re/1990019

Simply download this, add it to your project src directory (perhaps under a utilities package name) and use ExifUtil.rotateBitmap() to get the correct orientation, like so:

// photoFile is a File object for the image with EXIF data I want to rotate.

String imagePath = photoFile.getAbsolutePath();
Bitmap myBitmap  = BitmapFactory.decodeFile(imagePath);

Bitmap orientedBitmap = ExifUtil.rotateBitmap(imagePath, myBitmap);
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Improving on the solution above by Timmmm to add some extra scaling at the end to ensure that the image fits within the bounds:

public static Bitmap loadBitmap(String path, int orientation, final int targetWidth, final int targetHeight) {
    Bitmap bitmap = null;
    try {
        // First decode with inJustDecodeBounds=true to check dimensions
        final BitmapFactory.Options options = new BitmapFactory.Options();
        options.inJustDecodeBounds = true;
        BitmapFactory.decodeFile(path, options);

        // Adjust extents
        int sourceWidth, sourceHeight;
        if (orientation == 90 || orientation == 270) {
            sourceWidth = options.outHeight;
            sourceHeight = options.outWidth;
        } else {
            sourceWidth = options.outWidth;
            sourceHeight = options.outHeight;
        }

        // Calculate the maximum required scaling ratio if required and load the bitmap
        if (sourceWidth > targetWidth || sourceHeight > targetHeight) {
            float widthRatio = (float)sourceWidth / (float)targetWidth;
            float heightRatio = (float)sourceHeight / (float)targetHeight;
            float maxRatio = Math.max(widthRatio, heightRatio);
            options.inJustDecodeBounds = false;
            options.inSampleSize = (int)maxRatio;
            bitmap = BitmapFactory.decodeFile(path, options);
        } else {
            bitmap = BitmapFactory.decodeFile(path);
        }

        // Rotate the bitmap if required
        if (orientation > 0) {
            Matrix matrix = new Matrix();
            matrix.postRotate(orientation);
            bitmap = Bitmap.createBitmap(bitmap, 0, 0, bitmap.getWidth(), bitmap.getHeight(), matrix, true);
        }

        // Re-scale the bitmap if necessary
        sourceWidth = bitmap.getWidth();
        sourceHeight = bitmap.getHeight();
        if (sourceWidth != targetWidth || sourceHeight != targetHeight) {
            float widthRatio = (float)sourceWidth / (float)targetWidth;
            float heightRatio = (float)sourceHeight / (float)targetHeight;
            float maxRatio = Math.max(widthRatio, heightRatio);
            sourceWidth = (int)((float)sourceWidth / maxRatio);
            sourceHeight = (int)((float)sourceHeight / maxRatio);
            bitmap = Bitmap.createScaledBitmap(bitmap, sourceWidth, sourceHeight, true);
        }
    } catch (Exception e) {
    }
    return bitmap;
}
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maybe this will help (rotate 90 degree)(this worked for me)

private Bitmap rotateBitmap(Bitmap image){
        int width=image.getHeight();
        int height=image.getWidth();

        Bitmap srcBitmap=Bitmap.createBitmap(width, height, image.getConfig());

        for (int y=width-1;y>=0;y--)
            for(int x=0;x<height;x++)
                srcBitmap.setPixel(width-y-1, x,image.getPixel(x, y));
        return srcBitmap;

    }
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I improved upon the answer by Teo Inke. It no longer rotates the image unless it is actually necessary. It is also easier to read, and should run faster.

// Load Image
Bitmap bitmap = BitmapFactory.decodeFile(filePath);

// Rotate Image if Needed
try
{
    // Determine Orientation
    ExifInterface exif = new ExifInterface(filePath);
    int orientation = exif.getAttributeInt(ExifInterface.TAG_ORIENTATION, 1);

    // Determine Rotation
    int rotation = 0;
    if      (orientation == 6)      rotation = 90;
    else if (orientation == 3)      rotation = 180;
    else if (orientation == 8)      rotation = 270;

    // Rotate Image if Necessary
    if (rotation != 0)
    {
        // Create Matrix
        Matrix matrix = new Matrix();
        matrix.postRotate(rotation);

        // Rotate Bitmap
        Bitmap rotated = Bitmap.createBitmap(bitmap, 0, 0, bitmap.getWidth(), bitmap.getHeight(), matrix, true); 

        // Pretend none of this ever happened!
        bitmap.recycle();
        bitmap = rotated;
        rotated = null;
     }
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    // TODO: Log Error Messages Here
}

// TODO: Use Result Here
xxx.setBitmap(bitmap);
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The methods below scales AND rotates the bitmap according to the orientation:

public Bitmap scaleAndRotateImage(String path, int orientation, final int targetWidth, final int targetHeight)
{
    Bitmap bitmap = null;

    try
    {
        // Check the dimensions of the Image
        final BitmapFactory.Options options = new BitmapFactory.Options();
        options.inJustDecodeBounds = true;
        BitmapFactory.decodeFile(path, options);

        // Adjust the Width and Height
        int sourceWidth, sourceHeight;
        if (orientation == 90 || orientation == 270)
        {
            sourceWidth = options.outHeight;
            sourceHeight = options.outWidth;
        }
        else
        {
            sourceWidth = options.outWidth;
            sourceHeight = options.outHeight;
        }

        // Calculate the maximum required scaling ratio if required and load the bitmap
        if (sourceWidth > targetWidth || sourceHeight > targetHeight)
        {
            float widthRatio = (float)sourceWidth / (float)targetWidth;
            float heightRatio = (float)sourceHeight / (float)targetHeight;
            float maxRatio = Math.max(widthRatio, heightRatio);
            options.inJustDecodeBounds = false;
            options.inSampleSize = (int)maxRatio;
            bitmap = BitmapFactory.decodeFile(path, options);
        }
        else
        {
            bitmap = BitmapFactory.decodeFile(path);
        }

        // We need to rotate the bitmap (if required)
        int orientationInDegrees = exifToDegrees(orientation);
        if (orientation > 0)
        {
            Matrix matrix = new Matrix();
            if (orientation != 0f)
            {
                matrix.preRotate(orientationInDegrees);
            };

            bitmap = Bitmap.createBitmap(bitmap, 0, 0, bitmap.getWidth(), bitmap.getHeight(), matrix, true);
        }

        // Re-scale the bitmap if necessary
        sourceWidth = bitmap.getWidth();
        sourceHeight = bitmap.getHeight();

        if (sourceWidth != targetWidth || sourceHeight != targetHeight)
        {
            float widthRatio = (float)sourceWidth / (float)targetWidth;
            float heightRatio = (float)sourceHeight / (float)targetHeight;
            float maxRatio = Math.max(widthRatio, heightRatio);
            sourceWidth = (int)((float)sourceWidth / maxRatio);
            sourceHeight = (int)((float)sourceHeight / maxRatio);
            bitmap = Bitmap.createScaledBitmap(bitmap, sourceWidth, sourceHeight, true);
        }
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        Logger.d("Could not rotate the image");
        Logger.d(e.getMessage());
    }
    return bitmap;
}

Example:

public void getPictureFromDevice(Uri Uri,ImageView imageView)
{
    try
    {
        ExifInterface exifInterface = new ExifInterface(Uri.getPath());
        int orientation = exifInterface.getAttributeInt(ExifInterface.TAG_ORIENTATION, ExifInterface.ORIENTATION_NORMAL);

        Bitmap bitmap = scaleAndRotateImage(Uri.getPath(), orientation, imageView.getWidth(), imageView.getHeight());
        imageView.setImageBitmap(bitmap);
    }
    catch (OutOfMemoryError outOfMemoryError)
    {
        Logger.d(outOfMemoryError.getLocalizedMessage());
        Logger.d("Failed to load image from filePath (out of memory)");
        Logger.d(Uri.toString());
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        Logger.d("Failed to load image from filePath");
        Logger.d(Uri.toString());
    }
}
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I solved the problem with the following workaround. Note that I am also scaling the image, which was necessary to avoid OutOfMemoryExceptions.

Beware that this solution will not work properly with portrait images or opside-down images (thank you Timmmm for noting). Timmmm's solution above might be the better choice if that is required and it looks more elegant, too: http://stackoverflow.com/a/8914291/449918

File path = // ... location of your bitmap file
int w = 512; int h = 384; // size that does not lead to OutOfMemoryException on Nexus One
Bitmap b = BitmapFactory.decodeFile(path);


// Hack to determine whether the image is rotated
boolean rotated = b.getWidth() > b.getHeight();

Bitmap resultBmp = null;

// If not rotated, just scale it
if (!rotated) {
    resultBmp = Bitmap.createScaledBitmap(b, w, h, true);
    b.recycle();
    b = null;

// If rotated, scale it by switching width and height and then rotated it
} else {
    Bitmap scaledBmp = Bitmap.createScaledBitmap(b, h, w, true);
    b.recycle();
    b = null;

    Matrix mat = new Matrix();
    mat.postRotate(90);
    resultBmp = Bitmap.createBitmap(scaledBmp, 0, 0, h, w, mat, true);

    // Release image resources
    scaledBmp.recycle();
    scaledBmp = null;
}

// resultBmp now contains the scaled and rotated image

Cheers

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This isn't going to work properly. What about portrait images? Upside-down images? Using the exif data is much better. –  Timmmm Dec 18 '11 at 18:45
    
It works properly in one of my apps, but of course I have not tested all types of scenarios. @Timmmm could you please be more specific in what scenarios it does not work? I am also quite puzzled about you voting my post down. It seems to be a quite harsh response to an honest try to share a potential solution. –  Martin Jan 17 '12 at 16:09
    
I didn't mean to be harsh; sorry! I just didn't want anyone to copy your solution hoping it would work. As I said, it won't work for portrait or upside-down images. I will add the correct solution as an answer. –  Timmmm Jan 18 '12 at 17:05
    
I see. I will add a comment highlighting your solution above as the prefered one. –  Martin Jan 23 '12 at 22:21
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