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For one of my first ventures into JQuery, I have the very simple goal of stepping through the children of a div and fading them in and out one by one. For some reason though, if I manually define an index for nth-child, say 1, then the first child fades in and out four times. If I use the variable "i", however, then all of the children fade in and out four times. Why is this happening?

Here is my code:

<div id="slideshow">
    <p>Text1</p>
    <p>Text2</p>
    <p>Test3</p>
    <p>Text4</p>
</div>

<script>
$(document).ready(function() {
        var $elements = $('#slideshow').children();
        var len = $elements.length;
        var i = 1;
        for (i=1;i<=len;i++)
        {
            $("#slideshow p:nth-child(i)").fadeIn("slow").delay(800).fadeOut("slow");
        }
});
</script>

Each of the paragraphs is set to display: none; initially.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to escape i. Right now, nth-child is looking for the child that has an index of i, not of 0, 1, 2, etc. So instead, use:

$('#slideshow p:nth-child(' + i + ')').fadeIn('slow').delay(800).fadeOut('slow');

However, I don't think that will do one at a time; in fact, I'm pretty sure it won't. If it doesn't, try something like this:

var delay = 0;
$('#slideshow p').each(
    function (index, item)
    {
        $(this).delay(delay).fadeIn('slow').delay(800).fadeOut('slow');
        delay += 2200;
    }
);

That's untested, but should be decent pseudocode at the very least.

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1  
So much for untested. Code works and even in IE. Thanks. –  Oren Sep 5 '10 at 22:35
    
Sweet, glad it works! I was just guessing things would pan out as I wanted. Hahaha. You're welcome! –  Jeff Rupert Sep 5 '10 at 22:55

When you manually enter a index (1), then you loop 4 times and fadein the first child 4 times. When you use i they will all fadeIn four times since i inside a string is not a reference to the i variable, it's just part of the string.

$(document).ready(function() {
        var $elements = $('#slideshow').children();
        var len = $elements.length;
        var i = 1;
        for (i=1;i<=len;i++)
        {
            $("#slideshow p:nth-child("+i+")").fadeIn("slow").delay(800).fadeOut("slow");
        }
});

Should work, notice "+i+"

A better way to do this is:

$(function(){
    $('#slideshow p').each(function(i, node){
         setTimeout(function(){
             $(node).fadeIn("slow").delay(800).fadeOut("slow");
             node = null; //prevent memory leak
         }, i * 800);
    });
});
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I am not saying this impossible but in the end it will be pointless to use even if you get it to work, as it will fail on IE.

refer here. http://css-tricks.com/how-nth-child-works/

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Actually, since the OP is using jQuery, according to the linked article, that isn't an issue. One saving grace here is that if you are using jQuery, which supports all CSS selector including :nth-child, the selector will work, even in Internet Explorer. –  Jeff Rupert Sep 5 '10 at 22:30

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