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I have a query to the effect of

SELECT t3.id, a,bunch,of,other,stuff FROM t1, t2, t3 
WHERE (associate t1,t2, and t3 with each other) 
GROUP BY t3.id 
LIMIT 10,20

I want to know to many total rows this query would return without the LIMIT (so I can show pagination information).

Normally, I would use this query:

SELECT COUNT(t3.id) FROM t1, t2, t3 
WHERE (associate t1,t2, and t3 with each other) 
GROUP BY t3.id

However the GROUP BY changes the meaning of the COUNT, and instead I get a set of rows representing the number of unique t3.id values in each group.

Is there a way to get a count for the total number of rows when I use a GROUP BY? I'd like to avoid having to execute the entire query and just counting the number of rows, since I only need a subset of the rows because the values are paginated. I'm using MySQL 5, but I think this pretty generic.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 31 down vote accepted

There is a nice solution in MySQL.

Add the keyword SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS right after the keyword SELECT :

SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS t3.id, a,bunch,of,other,stuff FROM t1, t2, t3 
WHERE (associate t1,t2, and t3 with each other) 
GROUP BY t3.id 
LIMIT 10,20

After that, run another query with the function FOUND_ROWS() :

SELECT FOUND_ROWS();

It should return the number of rows without the LIMIT clause.

Checkout this page for more information : http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/information-functions.html#function_found-rows

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2  
With the disclaimer that I haven't benchmarked the calls myself, this article turned me off from the solution: mysqlperformanceblog.com/2007/08/28/… –  Brendan Berg Apr 19 '10 at 23:20
    
Rather executing multiple query please stackoverflow.com/a/364838/631652 for Tom's answer. –  Parixit Sep 19 '13 at 13:29

Are the "bunch of other stuff" all aggregates? I'm assuming so since your GROUP BY only has t3.id. If that's the case then this should work:

SELECT
     COUNT(DISTINCT t3.id)
FROM...

The other option of course is:

SELECT
     COUNT(*)
FROM
     (
     <Your query here>
     ) AS SQ

I don't use MySQL, so I don't know if these queries will work there or not.

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1  
In MySQL this will bug, but it might be an ok solution if you add an alias for the generated table. Otherwise you'll get the error: "Every derived table must have its own alias". So be sure to write something like: select count(*) from (your query) as resultTable –  Kennethvr Aug 31 '10 at 11:44
    
Thanks for the heads-up. I've made the edit. –  Tom H. Aug 31 '10 at 13:56
3  
works in MySQL for me. –  quano Feb 7 '11 at 9:48

You're using MySQL, so you can use their function to do exactly this.

SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS t3.id, a,bunch,of,other,stuff 
FROM t1, t2, t3 
WHERE (associate t1,t2, and t3 with each other) 
GROUP BY t3.id 
LIMIT 10,20;

SELECT FOUND_ROWS(); -- for most recent query

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/information-functions.html#function_found-rows

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Using sub queries :

SELECT COUNT(*) FROM    
(
SELECT t3.id, a,bunch,of,other,stuff FROM t1, t2, t3 
WHERE (associate t1,t2, and t3 with each other) 
GROUP BY t3.id 
)    
as temp;

so temp contains the count of rows.

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protected by user7116 Sep 28 '11 at 18:41

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