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I am giving link of a pdf file on my web page for download, like below

<a href="myfile.pdf">Download Brochure</a>

The problem is when user clicks on this link then

  • If the user have installed Adobe Acrobat, then it opens the file in the same browser window in Adobe Reader.
  • If the Adobe Acrobat is not installed then it pop-up to the user for Downloading the file.

But I want it always pop-up to the user for download, irrespective of "Adobe acrobat" is installed or not.

Please tell me how i can do this?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 50 down vote accepted

Instead of linking to the .PDF file, instead do something like

<a href="pdf_server.php?file=pdffilename">Download my eBook</a>

which outputs a custom header, opens the PDF (binary safe) and prints the data to the user's browser, then they can choose to save the PDF despite their browser settings. The pdf_server.php should look like this:

header("Content-Type: application/octet-stream");

$file = $_GET["file"] .".pdf";
header("Content-Disposition: attachment; filename=" . urlencode($file));   
header("Content-Type: application/octet-stream");
header("Content-Type: application/download");
header("Content-Description: File Transfer");            
header("Content-Length: " . filesize($file));
flush(); // this doesn't really matter.
$fp = fopen($file, "r");
while (!feof($fp))
{
    echo fread($fp, 65536);
    flush(); // this is essential for large downloads
} 
fclose($fp); 

PS: and obviously run some sanity checks on the "file" variable to prevent people from stealing your files such as don't accept file extensions, add .pdf to the value

share|improve this answer
    
Can you please provide me the code for that, how to do so in PHP. –  Prashant Dec 13 '08 at 7:19
    
I've updated my answer to include a coding example –  TravisO Dec 13 '08 at 7:24
    
Is it really matter if i use the following code $file = $_GET["file"] .".pdf"; AS $file = $_REQUEST["file"] .".pdf"; –  Prashant Dec 13 '08 at 7:41
2  
I am facing another problem with this, that my file is located at /products/brochure/myfile.pdf I am giving $file variable as $file_path = $_SERVER['DOCUMENT_ROOT'].'/products/brochure/' . $file; but its downloading the file as "%2Fvar%2Fwww%2Fweb15%2Fweb%2Fproducts%2Fbrochure%2myfile.pdf" –  Prashant Dec 13 '08 at 10:11
2  
@TravisO "Content-type: application/force-download" isn't listed anywhere here: iana.org/assignments/media-types/application It's a completely bogus header. Please don't make up headers and send them. Could you update your answer. Thanks. –  Nicholas Wilson Aug 28 '13 at 15:37

This is a common issue but few people know there's a simple HTML 5 solution:

<a href="./directory/yourfile.pdf" download="newfilename">Download the pdf</a>

Where newfilename is the suggested filename for the user to save the file. Or it will default to the filename on the serverside if you leave it empty, like this:

<a href="./directory/yourfile.pdf" download>Download the pdf</a>

Compatibility: I tested this on Firefox 21 and Iron, both worked fine. It might not work on HTML5-incompatible or outdated browsers. The only browser I tested that didn't force download is IE...

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1  
This is a simple solution but unfortunately not very widely supported, esp. no support by IE caniuse.com/#feat=download –  benebun Nov 13 '13 at 15:44
1  
Yep, I know right. That's why I have the side-note on compatibility. And according to your source both IE and Safari don't support this approach, or at least not yet :) Anyhow, if you want all browsers to force download I suggest checking some of the other answers instead... –  T_D Nov 14 '13 at 16:23
1  
works like a charm with chrome Version 39.0.2171.65 (64-bit) ! –  edelans Nov 21 at 20:32

Don't loop through every file line. Use readfile instead, its faster. This is off the php site: http://php.net/manual/en/function.readfile.php

$file = $_GET["file"];
if (file_exists($file)) {
    header('Content-Description: File Transfer');
    header('Content-Type: application/octet-stream');
    header("Content-Type: application/force-download");
    header('Content-Disposition: attachment; filename=' . urlencode(basename($file)));
    // header('Content-Transfer-Encoding: binary');
    header('Expires: 0');
    header('Cache-Control: must-revalidate, post-check=0, pre-check=0');
    header('Pragma: public');
    header('Content-Length: ' . filesize($file));
    ob_clean();
    flush();
    readfile($file);
    exit;
}

Make sure to sanitize your get variable as someone could download some php files...

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1  
The readfile function is indeed faster. I personally recommend using this answer instead of the accepted one –  Jose Garrido Feb 4 '13 at 21:08
    
how do i use this code??i have a similar doubt...stackoverflow.com/questions/18230369/… –  DarkHorse Aug 14 '13 at 13:57

Instead of using a PHP script, to read and flush the file, it's more neat to rewrite the header using .htaccess. This will keep a "nice" URL (myfile.pdf instead of download.php?myfile).

<FilesMatch "\.pdf$">
ForceType applicaton/octet-stream
Header set Content-Disposition attachment
</FilesMatch>
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Wouldn't this make ALL your PDFs force download? –  TecBrat Sep 26 at 14:54
    
@TecBrat Yes, but that was what the OP asked. If you want to limit to a few PDFs only, edit the ^\.pdf$ regular expression. –  Rob W Sep 26 at 14:55

I found a way to do it with plain old HTML and JavaScript/jQuery that degrades gracefully. Tested in IE7-10, Safari, Chrome, and FF:

HTML for download link:

<p>Thanks for downloading! If your download doesn't start shortly, 
<a id="downloadLink" href="...yourpdf.pdf" target="_blank" 
type="application/octet-stream" download="yourpdf.pdf">click here</a>.</p>

jQuery (pure JavaScript code would be more verbose) that simulates clicking on link after a small delay:

var delay = 3000;
window.setTimeout(function(){$('#downloadLink')[0].click();},delay);

To make this more robust you could add HTML5 feature detection and if it's not there then use window.open() to open a new window with the file.

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This is the key:

header("Content-Type: application/octet-stream");

Content-type application/x-pdf-document or application/pdf is sent while sending PDF file. Adobe Reader usually sets the handler for this MIME type so browser will pass the document to Adobe Reader when any of PDF MIME types is received.

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Put the file in a zip/rar file :)

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2  
that's not an elegant way of doing it , I guess the question is clear ! –  Mehran May 29 '13 at 21:07

In a Ruby on Rails application (especially with something like the Prawn gem and the Prawnto Rails plugin), you can accomplish this a little more simply than a full on script (like the previous PHP example).

In your controller:

def index

 respond_to do |format|
   format.html # Your HTML view
   format.pdf { render :layout => false }
 end
end

The render :layout => false part tells the browser to open up the "Would you like to download this file?" prompt instead of attempting to render the PDF. Then you would be able to link to the file normally: http://mysite.com/myawesomepdf.pdf

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Where to wrote this code? which controller, i am new to PHP please explain. –  Prashant Dec 13 '08 at 8:01
    
@Prashant This is not PHP, it's Ruby on Rails. –  El_Hoy Feb 22 '13 at 17:47

Try this:

<a href="pdf_server_with_path.php?file=pdffilename&path=http://myurl.com/mypath/">Download my eBook</a>

The code inside pdf_server_with_path.php is:

header("Content-Type: application/octet-stream");

$file = $_GET["file"] .".pdf";
$path = $_GET["path"];
$fullfile = $path.$file;

header("Content-Disposition: attachment; filename=" . Urlencode($file));   
header("Content-Type: application/force-download");
header("Content-Type: application/octet-stream");
header("Content-Type: application/download");
header("Content-Description: File Transfer");            
header("Content-Length: " . Filesize($fullfile));
flush(); // this doesn't really matter.
$fp = fopen($fullfile, "r");
while (!feof($fp))
{
    echo fread($fp, 65536);
    flush(); // this is essential for large downloads
} 
fclose($fp);
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