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I want to create a JavaScript function that parses my HTML page, get the Table by it's ID, and after that, add a class attribute to each <tr> as if the line is the 1st, I'll add : class="line1" to the <tr> but if the line is the second, I'll add class="line2" to the <tr> How to do please

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1  
Have you heard of jQuery? expect to about 10 times in the next twenty minutes. – jcolebrand Sep 6 '10 at 7:11
    
don't make him include n use JQuery for this purpose. – sv_in Sep 6 '10 at 8:12
up vote 6 down vote accepted

If I understand you corrrectly, you want to alternate the class names to get some kind of zebra style right?

var table = document.getElementById('yourTableId');
var rows = table.rows;
for(var i = 0, l = rows.length;i < l; i++) {
    rows[i].className = 'class' + ((i%2) + 1);
}

See the HTML DOM Table Object.

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Yahoo ! that's it and is this DOM ??? – Marouane Sep 6 '10 at 7:30
    
@taichimaro: Yes it's DOM. – Felix Kling Sep 6 '10 at 7:42
    
great ,, gud job.. true programmer – Amit Soni Sep 6 '10 at 8:03

its very easy in jquery ... as below :-

$(document).ready(function() {
    //for table row
    $("tr:even").addClass("AlternateBG1");
    $("tr:odd").addClass("AlternateBG2");
})

BUT IN JQUERY...

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A jQuery solution was not asked for. – James Sep 6 '10 at 8:35
var table = document.getElementById("yourTableId");
for(var i in table.rows){
  table.rows[i].className = 'line'+(i+1).toString();
}
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1  
Don't use the for(i in foo) loop for array-like structures (e.g. NodeLists). It's slow (very) and can result in non-related items being looped over (if any prototypes in the prototype chain of NodeList have been manipulated). – James Sep 6 '10 at 8:34

It is easy without jQuery:

oTBody=document.getElementById("tBodyId");
//for (key in oTbody.childNodes) {
for (var nPos=0, nLength = oTbody.childNodes.length; nPos<nLegth; nPos++)}
    oRow = oTbody.childNodes[nPos];
    if (oRow && oRow.tagName && oRow.tagName.toLowerCase() == "tr") {
        oRow.className = (bNormalRow? sClass1:sClass2);
        bNormalRow = !bNormalRow;
    }
}
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1  
Don't use the for(i in foo) loop for array-like structures (e.g. NodeLists). It's slow (very) and can result in non-related items being looped over (if any prototypes in the prototype chain of NodeList have been manipulated). – James Sep 6 '10 at 8:31
    
Right. Selected answer has the correct way. – pkario Sep 6 '10 at 12:06

With jQuery is really simple, do something like:

var i = 1;
$("#myTable tr").each(function() {
    $(this).addClass("line"+i);
    i++;
});

Where #myTable is your table id, and $(this) inside each function will be the current element on the cycle.

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It's an obligation to work just with javascript, no api must be used – Marouane Sep 6 '10 at 7:22
    
I've voted your answer down because of the "just do it with jQuery" attitude that everybody seems to insists on having. Nothing personal obviously, but it's frankly kind of annoying by now, and it's so unnecessary in simpler scenarios such as this one. – Rob Sep 6 '10 at 7:31
    
Plus, this doesn't even take advantage of the fact that each tr's index is passed as the first argument to the each callback. – James Sep 6 '10 at 8:32
    
That doesn't mean that is wrong. The function .each() for it self is already the slowest operation that you can do in JavaScript. If we go that way I should not use .each() function... – John Louros Sep 6 '10 at 19:15

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