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I understand this statement :-

List<string> a;

which means that a can contain values of only string type.

But when used with methods i get confused. For eg.

public T1 methodName <T1,T2>(T1 t, T1 p)

I understand the method is returning object of type T1 and accepts objects of type T1. But what is the significance of <T1,T2>? Why is it required?

Edit :- Based on the answers i received, i guess <T1, T2> are there so that input arguments looks similar. If <T1> was there then all input arguments must be of type T1 and if <T1,T2> is there means all arguments must be of type either T1 or T2

But what exactly is meant by this statement :-

public static TSummary Accumulate <TInput, TSummary> (IEnumerable <TInput> coll, Action <TInput, TSummary> action)

The definition says all input must be of either TInput or TSummary but the second argument is of type Action. So i am still confused.

Thanks in advance :)

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"If <T1> was there then all input arguments must be of type T1 and if <T1,T2> is there means all arguments must be of type either T1 or T2" -- that statement is incorrect. The <T1,T2> does not mean T1 or T2, it just means the method is using two different types. –  Mark Sep 6 '10 at 8:41
    
(You can read on MSDN about these). An Action represents a delegate that performs something with the parameters passed to it, without returning a result. All the types that are present there are input types, so you can say Action<T1,T2,T3> has 3 input parameters of type T1, T2, T3. A Func is a delegate that can take some parameters and returns a value, so the last type in the Func definition is the type of the return value: Func<T1,T2,T3> uses T1 and T2 internally and returns T3. –  DaeMoohn Sep 6 '10 at 12:55

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If the method is really defined in the way that you've typed exactly:

public T1 methodName <T1, T2>(T1 t, T1 p)

...then T2 is unrelated to the argument types or return type. It might affect what's happening inside the method, however (e.g., the method may internally call typeof(T2) and do something with that).

If it was a typo, and the second parameter should read T2 p, then DaeMoohn is correct.


UPDATE:

If <T1> was there then all input arguments must be of type T1 and if <T1,T2> is there means all arguments must be of type either T1 or T2

No! Inaccurate!

The types of the parameters are specified right there in the parameter declaration: (T1 t, T1 p) -- both must be of type T1 (just like if the parameters were declared (int x, int y) they'd both have to be int).

Let's look at that Accumulate signature:

public static TSummary Accumulate <TInput, TSummary> (IEnumerable <TInput> coll, Action <TInput, TSummary> action)

This method takes some sequence of TInput values (coll) and some delegate pointing to a method that accepts a TInput and a TSummary parameter (action). The method returns an object of type TSummary.

What's confusing about your first example is that one of the generic type arguments, T2, just happened not to be anywhere within the method signature itself. This simply means that T2 is not related to either the parameters or the return value. But it could still be used within the method.

For example, consider this (fictional) method:

string GetTypeName<T>();

What does T mean in the above signature? It isn't the return type (string), nor is it in the parameter list (there are none). So does it mean anything? Presumably, it indicates what type you want to get the name of. So internally the method would probably look like this:

return typeof(T).FullName;

The point here is that T2 in your first example must (if anything) affect only the internals of the method itself. Again: it is not related to the parameters or the return value.

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Please read my edited post. –  TCM Sep 6 '10 at 8:18
    
@Nitesh: I've updated my answer in response to your update. –  Dan Tao Sep 6 '10 at 8:32
    
@Dan : - This method takes some sequence of TInput values (coll) and some delegate pointing to a method that accepts a TInput and a TSummary parameter (action). The method returns an object of type TSummary. How did you know the method returns an object of type TSummary? –  TCM Sep 6 '10 at 8:48
    
@Nitesh: Because that's the return type of the method: public static TSummary Accumulate... –  Dan Tao Sep 6 '10 at 9:07
    
Oh ok you're talking about Accumulate. I thought you were talking about action –  TCM Sep 6 '10 at 9:12

public T1 methodName <T1,T2>(T1 t, T1 p) lets you pass 2 generic parameters.
Hence, you can call this method in the following form

methodName<string, string>("hello", "world");
methodName<string, int>("hello", "world");
methodName<int, string>(1, 2);

Note: I didn't find the use of T2 & don't know, why is it required when the method signature isn't using it. Hence, I am passing all the parameters above in string form.

Simply put, it means that the method accepts 2 parameters which can be any type of your choice (unless the restrictions are placed).

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1  
That last one isn't right. You could not pass "hello" and "world" to methodName<int, string> based on the signature provided by the OP (both arguments would have to be of type int). –  Dan Tao Sep 6 '10 at 8:00
    
@Dan: +1 & Thanks.Corrected. –  shahkalpesh Sep 6 '10 at 8:02
    
Please read my edited post. –  TCM Sep 6 '10 at 8:19

The <T1,T2> section is to tell the compiler that T1 and T2 are type parameters. Simply starting their names with "T" isn't enough, that's just a convention. Once you've defined the type parameter names, you can use the names wherever you would use a type inside the method and the method signature.

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Thanks Douglas, for now i'll understand the fact they are just sort of namespace from where compiler detects the type ;) else it will give compilation error that T1 and T2 are not defined. –  TCM Sep 6 '10 at 9:44

But what exactly is meant by this statement :-

public static TSummary Accumulate <TInput, TSummary>(IEnumerable <TInput> coll, Action<TInput, TSummary> action)

The definition says all input must be of either TInput or TSummary but the second argument is of type Action. So i am still confused.

The second argument is of type Action<TInput, TSummary>, not Action.

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It means methodName returns an object of type T1 and accepts two parameters of types T1 and T2.

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2  
But the way he's written it, the parameters are actually both of type T1. –  Dan Tao Sep 6 '10 at 8:01
    
Well... it accepts two type parameters, T1 and T2, and two parameters of type T1. Changing just T2 could change the behaviour of the method, even if all the normal parameters and the return value are T1, so it is valid. But it is unusual. –  Douglas Sep 6 '10 at 10:17
    
Well you are right, I didn't check the second parameter type! –  DaeMoohn Sep 6 '10 at 12:47

In order to define the types of a generic method parameters like this you should use this T1,T2 notation.

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You could get around the whole issue by making your program simpler. E.g. use a table of objects instead of generics in this case.

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- That is not the answer to my question. The whole idea of generics is to provide type safety. With objects, you can store anything which is not the case with Generics. The type which you define only that can be stored in that particular object. –  TCM Sep 6 '10 at 17:10

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