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One of my homework questions asked to develop a regex for all strings over x,y,z that did not contain xxx

After doing some reading I found out about negative lookahead and made this which works great:

(x(?!xx)|y|z)*

Still, in the spirit of completeness, is there anyway to write this without negative lookahead?

Reading I have done makes me think it can be done with some combination of carets (^), but I cannot get the right combination so I am not sure.

Taking it a step further, is it possible to exclude a string like xxx using only the or (|) operator, but still check the strings in a recursive fashion?

EDIT 9/6/2010:

Think I answered my own question. I messed with this some more, trying make this regex with only or (|) statements and I am pretty sure I figured it out... and it isn't nearly as messy as I thought it would be. If someone else has time to verify this with a human eye I would appreciate it.

(xxy|xxz|xy|xz|y|z)*(xxy|xxz|xx|xy|xz|x|y|z)

share|improve this question
    
typoknig - I've updated my answer further, based on your latest edit. I'm quite intrigued though - the pattern is essentially a flat version of my first pattern. x{0,2} can be written as |x|xx, and a(b|c) can be written as ab|ac - why do you prefer the second one in each case? – Kobi Sep 7 '10 at 18:17
1  
I actually prefer my first answer as it seems the most direct, but my professors are purists and I believe they would rather see me use only the most basic regex elements, and by basic I mean (|) and (*). – ubiquibacon Sep 8 '10 at 1:16
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Try this:

^(x{0,2}(y|z|$))*$

The basic idea is this: for match at most 2 X's, followed by another letter or the end of the string.

When you reach a point where you have 3 X's, the regex has no rule that allows it to keep matching, and it fails.

Working example: http://rubular.com/r/ePH0fHlZxL

A less compact way to write the same is (with free spaces, usually the /x flag):

^(
y|         # y is ok
z|         # so is z
x(y|z|$)|  # a single x, not followed by x
xx(y|z|$)  # 2 x's, not followed by x
)*$

Based on the latest edit, here's an ever flatter version of the pattern: I'm not entirely sure I understand your fascination with the pipe, but you can eliminate some more options - by allowing an empty match on the second group you don't need to repeat permutations from the first group. That regex also allows ε, which I think is included in your language.

^(xxy|xxz|xy|xz|y|z)*(xx|x|)$
share|improve this answer
    
@typoknig - I posted a more literal way to match your language. There are many more between them, like ^(x|y|xx?(y|z|$))*$ – Kobi Sep 6 '10 at 9:44

Basically you have the right answer already - well done you. :)

Carat (^) in a set [^abc] will only match where it does not find a character in that set so it's application for matching orders of characters (i.e. strings) is limited and weak.

Regex has numeric quantifiers {n} and {a,b} which allow you to match a defined number of repititions of a pattern, which would work for this specific pattern (because it's 'x' repeated) but it's not particularily expressive of the problem you're trying to solve (even for regex!) and is a bit brittle (it wouldn't be appropriate for negative match 'xyx' for example.

An or pattern again would be verbose and rather unexpressive but it could be done as the fragment:

(x|xx)[^x] // x OR xx followed by NOT x

Obviously you can do this with an iterative algorithm but that's highly inefficient compared to a regex.

Well done for thinking beyond the solution though.

share|improve this answer
1  
(x|xx)[^x] will fail at the end of the string, though. – Tim Pietzcker Sep 6 '10 at 9:52
    
@Tim Pietzcker - sure it's just a fragment, it changes with context @typoknig - ad absurdum any pattern is expressable as a series of ORs, you just OR every absolute possible match together, it's just that at that point it's no longer a pattern you're representing. But hypothetically yes it's always possible. – annakata Sep 6 '10 at 10:39

I know you don't want to use lookahead, but here's another way to solve this:

^(?:(?!xxx)[xyz])*$

will match any line of characters x, y or z as long as it doesn't contain the string xxx.

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent, there are plenty of options for sure. I came across a question here at SO once (but I cannot find it now) where someone was asking a similar question to mine because negative lookahead would not work on their compiler or something like that. Does that sound right? – ubiquibacon Sep 6 '10 at 10:12
1  
Usually it's lookbehind that's missing (most notable examples being JavaScript and Ruby until 1.8); most regex flavors have lookahead nowadays except POSIX/GNU BRE/ERE engines. – Tim Pietzcker Sep 6 '10 at 10:32

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