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How can I move elements in an array to the next element

eg: x[5] = { 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 }; // initial values
    x[0] = 6; // new values to be shifted
    x[5] = { 6, 5, 4, 3, 2 }; // shifted array, it need to be shifted, 
                              // not just increment the values.

This what I've done so far. It's wrong, that's why I need help here. Thanks in advance.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main() 
{
  int x[5] = { 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 };

  int array_size = sizeof(x) / sizeof(x[0]);

  x[0] = 6;

  int m = 1;

  for(int j = 0; j < array_size; j++) {
    x[m+j] = x[j];
    cout << x[j] << endl;
  }

  return 0;
}
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Start this copying in array from end index of the array rather then from starting,because when you start copying the element from start you will loose the next element. So change the for loop –  Anil Vishnoi Sep 6 '10 at 9:38
    
Please note "off by one": x[m+j] = x[j]; will try to overwrite the element with index "array_size" which is outsize the array - that's undefined behavior. –  sharptooth Sep 6 '10 at 9:38
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7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted
#include <iostream>
int
main ()
{
  int x[5] = { 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 };

  int array_size = sizeof (x) / sizeof (x[0]);

  for (int j = array_size - 1; j > 0; j--)
    {
      x[j] = x[j - 1];
    }

  x[0] = 6;

  for (int j = 0; j < array_size; j++)
    {
      std::cout << x[j];
    }

  return 0;
}
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Thank you so much. –  azam Sep 6 '10 at 9:58
    
Doesn't this intentionally run the risk of producing a segmentation fault? –  kjh May 2 at 22:26
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To "move rightwards" you have to iterate from the end of array:

for(int j = array_size - 2; j >= 0; j--) {
   x[m+j] = x[j];
   cout << x[j] << endl;
}   

otherwise you just overwrite all the elements with the 0th element.

Please note array_size - 2 - otherwise you have "off by one" trying to access the element beyond the array end and that's undefined behavior.

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1  
+1 good catch, missed by everyone else (including myself :-) –  Péter Török Sep 6 '10 at 9:38
    
doesn't work. output become 2,3,4,6 –  azam Sep 6 '10 at 9:47
1  
@azam: I only pointed out the major problem in your code. You still have to put the value into the [0] element yourself and you'll have to iterate over the array for the second time to get the output. –  sharptooth Sep 6 '10 at 9:52
    
I see. Thank you for your input. –  azam Sep 6 '10 at 9:54
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#include<algorithm>

// ...
std::rotate(x, x+4, x+5);
x[0] = 6;
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sorry. i don't want to use algo. –  azam Sep 6 '10 at 9:56
1  
+1 From me for actually providing a C++ solution. –  FredOverflow Sep 6 '10 at 11:15
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First of all, you should shift the old values in the array before you write the new value. But instead of a loop, you are better of using memmove(). Or even better with std::vector instead of an array - it handles all these low-level issues for you, including automatically resizing the array when needed.

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+1 for memmove –  Alexandre C. Sep 6 '10 at 9:40
    
But I guess this is homework, so loops and index manipulation is required I guess. –  Cedric H. Sep 6 '10 at 9:51
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In the general case where you need to shift m elements (where 0 <= m <n): Start from the end of the array. If you start at the begining (index 0) then you overwrite and then move that overridden value.

Studying the source code of std::memmove may be instructive as well.

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You can start from the end of the array. You copy the

  • element in 2nd last position to the last position,
  • element in 3rd last position to the 2nd last position,
  • ....
  • element in first position(index 0) to the 2nd position and finally
  • copy the new number in the first position. .

.

for(j = array_size-1; j >0; j--) {
 x[j] = x[j-1];
}
x[0] = 6;
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    #include <iostream>

    using namespace std;

    int main() 
    {
       int x[5] = { 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 };

        int array_size = sizeof(x) / sizeof(x[0]);

        int m = 1;

        for(int j = array_size-1; j > 0; j--) {
           x[j] = x[j-m];
           cout << x[j] << endl;
        }

       x[0] = 6;
       return 0;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
your output is 2,3,4,5 –  azam Sep 6 '10 at 9:57
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