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I have a script that I need to run on a large number of files with the extension *.tar.gz.

Instead of uncompressing them and then running the script, I want to be able to uncompress them as I run the command and then work on the uncompressed folder, all with a single command.

I think a pipe is a good solution for this but i haven't used it before. How would I do this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The -v orders tar to print filenames as it extracts each file:

tar -xzvf file.tar.gz | xargs -I {} -d\\n myscript "{}"

This way the script will contain commands to deal with a single file, passed as a parameter (thanks to xargs) to your script ($1 in the script context).

Edit: the -I {} -d\\n part will make it work with spaces in filenames.

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-c and -z? and no argument to -f? –  strager Sep 6 '10 at 10:53
    
@strager sorry I was fixing that –  aularon Sep 6 '10 at 10:54
    
-v will give you a list of each file expanded. @sfactor wanted his script to "work on the uncompressed folder" presumably for each of the files *.tar.gz (which you'll need to add to your tar command). –  Johnsyweb Sep 6 '10 at 11:01
    
@Johnsyweb: he is saying: what i want to do is instead of uncompressing them and then running the script, i want to be able to uncompress them as i run the command and then work on the uncompressed folder, all with a single command . –  aularon Sep 6 '10 at 11:04
    
@strager -z is because he wants to work on a .gz tar archive. –  aularon Sep 6 '10 at 11:10

The following three lines of bash...

for archive in *.tar.gz; do
    tar zxvf "${archive}" 2>&1 | sed -e 's!x \([^/]*\)/.*!\1!' | sort -u | xargs some_script.sh
done

...will iterate over each gzipped tarball in the current directory, decompress it, grab the top-most directories of the decompressed contents and pass those as arguments to somescript.sh. This probably uses more pipes than you were expecting but seems to do what you are asking for.

N.B: tar xf can only take one file per invocation.

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You can use a for loop:

for file in *.tar.gz; do tar -xf "$file"; your commands here; done

Or expanded:

for file in *.tar.gz; do
    tar -xf "$file"
    # your commands here
done
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2  
if you don't quote $file, this will fail for any filenames containing spaces. –  static_rtti Sep 6 '10 at 11:08
    
@static_rtti, That's evil! But you're right; thanks. –  strager Sep 6 '10 at 11:09

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