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I would like to know if it is possible to get a profile from R-Code in a way that is similar to matlab's Profiler. That is, to get to know which line numbers are the one's that are especially slow.

What I acchieved so far is somehow not satisfactory. I used Rprof to make me a profile file. Using summaryRprof I get something like the following:

$by.self
                  self.time self.pct total.time total.pct
[.data.frame               0.72     10.1       1.84      25.8
inherits                   0.50      7.0       1.10      15.4
data.frame                 0.48      6.7       4.86      68.3
unique.default             0.44      6.2       0.48       6.7
deparse                    0.36      5.1       1.18      16.6
rbind                      0.30      4.2       2.22      31.2
match                      0.28      3.9       1.38      19.4
[<-.factor                 0.28      3.9       0.56       7.9
levels                     0.26      3.7       0.34       4.8
NextMethod                 0.22      3.1       0.82      11.5
...

and

$by.total
                      total.time total.pct self.time self.pct
data.frame                  4.86      68.3      0.48      6.7
rbind                       2.22      31.2      0.30      4.2
do.call                     2.22      31.2      0.00      0.0
[                           1.98      27.8      0.16      2.2
[.data.frame                1.84      25.8      0.72     10.1
match                       1.38      19.4      0.28      3.9
%in%                        1.26      17.7      0.14      2.0
is.factor                   1.20      16.9      0.10      1.4
deparse                     1.18      16.6      0.36      5.1
...

To be honest, from this output I don't get where my bottlenecks are because (a) I use data.frame pretty often and (b) I never use e.g., deparse. Furthermore, what is [?

So I tried Hadley Wickham's profr, but it was not any more useful considering the following graph: alt text

Is there a more convenient way to see which line numbers and particular function calls are slow?
Or, is there some literature that I should consult?

Any hints appreciated.

EDIT 1:
Based on Hadley's comment I will paste the code of my script below and the base graph version of the plot. But note, that my question is not related to this specific script. It is just a random script that I recently wrote. I am looking for a general way of how to find bottlenecks and speed up R-code.

The data (x) looks like this:

type      word    response    N   Classification  classN
Abstract  ANGER   bitter      1   3a              3a
Abstract  ANGER   control     1   1a              1a
Abstract  ANGER   father      1   3a              3a
Abstract  ANGER   flushed     1   3a              3a
Abstract  ANGER   fury        1   1c              1c
Abstract  ANGER   hat         1   3a              3a
Abstract  ANGER   help        1   3a              3a
Abstract  ANGER   mad         13  3a              3a
Abstract  ANGER   management  2   1a              1a
... until row 1700

The script (with short explanations) is this:

Rprof("profile1.out")

# A new dataset is produced with each line of x contained x$N times 
y <- vector('list',length(x[,1]))
for (i in 1:length(x[,1])) {
  y[[i]] <- data.frame(rep(x[i,1],x[i,"N"]),rep(x[i,2],x[i,"N"]),rep(x[i,3],x[i,"N"]),rep(x[i,4],x[i,"N"]),rep(x[i,5],x[i,"N"]),rep(x[i,6],x[i,"N"]))
}
all <- do.call('rbind',y)
colnames(all) <- colnames(x)

# create a dataframe out of a word x class table
table_all <- table(all$word,all$classN)
dataf.all <- as.data.frame(table_all[,1:length(table_all[1,])])
dataf.all$words <- as.factor(rownames(dataf.all))
dataf.all$type <- "no"
# get type of the word.
words <- levels(dataf.all$words)
for (i in 1:length(words)) {
  dataf.all$type[i] <- as.character(all[pmatch(words[i],all$word),"type"])
}
dataf.all$type <- as.factor(dataf.all$type)
dataf.all$typeN <- as.numeric(dataf.all$type)

# aggregate response categories
dataf.all$c1 <- apply(dataf.all[,c("1a","1b","1c","1d","1e","1f")],1,sum)
dataf.all$c2 <- apply(dataf.all[,c("2a","2b","2c")],1,sum)
dataf.all$c3 <- apply(dataf.all[,c("3a","3b")],1,sum)

Rprof(NULL)

library(profr)
ggplot.profr(parse_rprof("profile1.out"))

Final data looks like this:

1a    1b  1c  1d  1e  1f  2a  2b  2c  3a  3b  pa  words   type    typeN   c1  c2  c3  pa
3 0   8   0   0   0   0   0   0   24  0   0   ANGER   Abstract    1   11  0   24  0
6 0   4   0   1   0   0   11  0   13  0   0   ANXIETY Abstract    1   11  11  13  0
2 11  1   0   0   0   0   4   0   17  0   0   ATTITUDE    Abstract    1   14  4   17  0
9 18  0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   8   0   BARREL  Concrete    2   27  0   8   0
0 1   18  0   0   0   0   4   0   12  0   0   BELIEF  Abstract    1   19  4   12  0

The base graph plot: alt text

Running the script today also changed the ggplot2 graph a little (basically only the labels), see here.

share|improve this question
    
Can you try using plot instead of ggplot with profr? It would also be useful to see your original code. –  hadley Sep 6 '10 at 18:26
3  
I get so tired of pointing this out. Profilers based on the same ideas as in gprof have the same faults. All this business about self time, functions instead of lines, graphs, and measurement in general, are just the same warmed-over useless concepts. There are easy ways around it: stackoverflow.com/questions/1777556/alternatives-to-gprof/… –  Mike Dunlavey Sep 7 '10 at 1:17
1  
@hadely: see my edit. @Mike: I get that finding the problem and not measuring sth. basically unrelated is your point. It sound exactly like what I am looking for. But is this implemented in R somewhere? –  Henrik Sep 7 '10 at 13:52
    
@Henrik: Somebody just gave me a vote and brought my attention back here. In fact I've used Rprof, but only to take samples (at large intervals), not to "analyze" them. The samples end up in a file, and I just look at them. Although they don't contain line-number information, they work. If function A calls function B in two places, I instead have A call B1 and B2, and those guys call B. That way I can tell where in A the calls come from. Kludgy, but it gets the job done. –  Mike Dunlavey Mar 24 '13 at 15:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 27 down vote accepted

Alert readers of yesterdays breaking news (R 3.0.0 is finally out) may have noticed something interesting that is directly relevant to this question:

  • Profiling via Rprof() now optionally records information at the statement level, not just the function level.

And indeed, this new feature answers my question and I will show how.


Let's say, we want to compare whether vectorizing and pre-allocating are really better than good old for-loops and incremental building of data in calculating a summary statistic such as the mean. The, relatively stupid, code is the following:

# create big data frame:
n <- 1000
x <- data.frame(group = sample(letters[1:4], n, replace=TRUE), condition = sample(LETTERS[1:10], n, replace = TRUE), data = rnorm(n))

# reasonable operations:
marginal.means.1 <- aggregate(data ~ group + condition, data = x, FUN=mean)

# unreasonable operations:
marginal.means.2 <- marginal.means.1[NULL,]

row.counter <- 1
for (condition in levels(x$condition)) {
  for (group in levels(x$group)) {  
    tmp.value <- 0
    tmp.length <- 0
    for (c in 1:nrow(x)) {
      if ((x[c,"group"] == group) & (x[c,"condition"] == condition)) {
        tmp.value <- tmp.value + x[c,"data"]
        tmp.length <- tmp.length + 1
      }
    }
    marginal.means.2[row.counter,"group"] <- group 
    marginal.means.2[row.counter,"condition"] <- condition
    marginal.means.2[row.counter,"data"] <- tmp.value / tmp.length
    row.counter <- row.counter + 1
  }
}

# does it produce the same results?
all.equal(marginal.means.1, marginal.means.2)

To use this code with Rprof, we need to parse it. That is, it needs to be saved in a file and then called from there. Hence, I uploaded it to pastebin, but it works exactly the same with local files.

Now, we

  • simply create a profile file and indicate that we want to save the line number,
  • source the code with the incredible combination eval(parse(..., keep.source = TRUE)) (seemingly the infamous fortune(106) does not apply here, as I haven't found another way)
  • stop the profiling and indicate that we want the output based on the line numbers.

The code is:

Rprof("profile1.out", line.profiling=TRUE)
eval(parse(file = "http://pastebin.com/download.php?i=KjdkSVZq", keep.source=TRUE))
Rprof(NULL)

summaryRprof("profile1.out", lines = "show")

Which gives:

$by.self
                           self.time self.pct total.time total.pct
download.php?i=KjdkSVZq#17      8.04    64.11       8.04     64.11
<no location>                   4.38    34.93       4.38     34.93
download.php?i=KjdkSVZq#16      0.06     0.48       0.06      0.48
download.php?i=KjdkSVZq#18      0.02     0.16       0.02      0.16
download.php?i=KjdkSVZq#23      0.02     0.16       0.02      0.16
download.php?i=KjdkSVZq#6       0.02     0.16       0.02      0.16

$by.total
                           total.time total.pct self.time self.pct
download.php?i=KjdkSVZq#17       8.04     64.11      8.04    64.11
<no location>                    4.38     34.93      4.38    34.93
download.php?i=KjdkSVZq#16       0.06      0.48      0.06     0.48
download.php?i=KjdkSVZq#18       0.02      0.16      0.02     0.16
download.php?i=KjdkSVZq#23       0.02      0.16      0.02     0.16
download.php?i=KjdkSVZq#6        0.02      0.16      0.02     0.16

$by.line
                           self.time self.pct total.time total.pct
<no location>                   4.38    34.93       4.38     34.93
download.php?i=KjdkSVZq#6       0.02     0.16       0.02      0.16
download.php?i=KjdkSVZq#16      0.06     0.48       0.06      0.48
download.php?i=KjdkSVZq#17      8.04    64.11       8.04     64.11
download.php?i=KjdkSVZq#18      0.02     0.16       0.02      0.16
download.php?i=KjdkSVZq#23      0.02     0.16       0.02      0.16

$sample.interval
[1] 0.02

$sampling.time
[1] 12.54

Checking the source code tells us that the problematic line (#17) is indeed the stupid if-statement in the for-loop. Compared with basically no time for calculating the same using vectorized code (line #6).

I haven't tried it with any graphical output, but I am already very impressed by what I got so far.

share|improve this answer
3  
Why not source("http://pastebin.com/download.php?i=KjdkSVZq") instead of eval(parse(..., keep.source = TRUE))? –  flodel Apr 5 '13 at 0:11
    
@flodel indeed, works seemingly the same way. –  Henrik Apr 5 '13 at 7:08
    
Can it tell, by source line, what fraction of the time that line was on the stack? Is that what "total.pct" is? –  Mike Dunlavey Apr 19 '13 at 21:58
    
Is the parsing necessary? Can't I just give the R experssions directly between the Rprof lines? –  Avinash 7 hours ago
    
@Avinash No, see comment by flodel above. You can simply source it. If other versions also work, you need to try out on your own. –  Henrik 6 hours ago

Update: This function has been re-written to deal with line numbers. It's on github here.

I wrote this function to parse the file from Rprof and output a table of somewhat clearer results than summaryRprof. It displays the full stack of functions (and line numbers if line.profiling=TRUE), and their relative contribution to run time:

proftable <- function(file, lines=10) {
# require(plyr)
  interval <- as.numeric(strsplit(readLines(file, 1), "=")[[1L]][2L])/1e+06
  profdata <- read.table(file, header=FALSE, sep=" ", comment.char = "",
                         colClasses="character", skip=1, fill=TRUE,
                         na.strings="")
  filelines <- grep("#File", profdata[,1])
  files <- aaply(as.matrix(profdata[filelines,]), 1, function(x) {
                        paste(na.omit(x), collapse = " ") })
  profdata <- profdata[-filelines,]
  total.time <- interval*nrow(profdata)
  profdata <- as.matrix(profdata[,ncol(profdata):1])
  profdata <- aaply(profdata, 1, function(x) {
                      c(x[(sum(is.na(x))+1):length(x)],
                        x[seq(from=1,by=1,length=sum(is.na(x)))])
              })
  stringtable <- table(apply(profdata, 1, paste, collapse=" "))
  uniquerows <- strsplit(names(stringtable), " ")
  uniquerows <- llply(uniquerows, function(x) replace(x, which(x=="NA"), NA))
  dimnames(stringtable) <- NULL
  stacktable <- ldply(uniquerows, function(x) x)
  stringtable <- stringtable/sum(stringtable)*100
  stacktable <- data.frame(PctTime=stringtable[], stacktable)
  stacktable <- stacktable[order(stringtable, decreasing=TRUE),]
  rownames(stacktable) <- NULL
  stacktable <- head(stacktable, lines)
  na.cols <- which(sapply(stacktable, function(x) all(is.na(x))))
  stacktable <- stacktable[-na.cols]
  parent.cols <- which(sapply(stacktable, function(x) length(unique(x)))==1)
  parent.call <- paste0(paste(stacktable[1,parent.cols], collapse = " > ")," >")
  stacktable <- stacktable[,-parent.cols]
  calls <- aaply(as.matrix(stacktable[2:ncol(stacktable)]), 1, function(x) {
                   paste(na.omit(x), collapse= " > ")
                     })
  stacktable <- data.frame(PctTime=stacktable$PctTime, Call=calls)
  frac <- sum(stacktable$PctTime)
  attr(stacktable, "total.time") <- total.time
  attr(stacktable, "parent.call") <- parent.call
  attr(stacktable, "files") <- files
  attr(stacktable, "total.pct.time") <- frac
  cat("\n")
  print(stacktable, row.names=FALSE, right=FALSE, digits=3)
  cat("\n")
  cat(paste(files, collapse="\n"))
  cat("\n")
  cat(paste("\nParent Call:", parent.call))
  cat(paste("\n\nTotal Time:", total.time, "seconds\n"))
  cat(paste0("Percent of run time represented: ", format(frac, digits=3)), "%")

  invisible(stacktable)
}

Running this on the Henrik's example file, I get this:

> Rprof("profile1.out", line.profiling=TRUE)
> source("http://pastebin.com/download.php?i=KjdkSVZq")
> Rprof(NULL)
> proftable("profile1.out", lines=10)

 PctTime Call                                                      
 20.47   1#17 > [ > 1#17 > [.data.frame                            
  9.73   1#17 > [ > 1#17 > [.data.frame > [ > [.factor             
  8.72   1#17 > [ > 1#17 > [.data.frame > [ > [.factor > NextMethod
  8.39   == > Ops.factor                                           
  5.37   ==                                                        
  5.03   == > Ops.factor > noNA.levels > levels                    
  4.70   == > Ops.factor > NextMethod                              
  4.03   1#17 > [ > 1#17 > [.data.frame > [ > [.factor > levels    
  4.03   1#17 > [ > 1#17 > [.data.frame > dim                      
  3.36   1#17 > [ > 1#17 > [.data.frame > length                   

#File 1: http://pastebin.com/download.php?i=KjdkSVZq

Parent Call: source > withVisible > eval > eval >

Total Time: 5.96 seconds
Percent of run time represented: 73.8 %

Note that the "Parent Call" applies to all the stacks represented on the table. This makes is useful when your IDE or whatever calls your code wraps it in a bunch of functions.

share|improve this answer
    
Looks nice. But is there any chance to also obtain the information in which line we are (i.e., from which line the stack was called)? –  Henrik Apr 19 '13 at 18:51
    
@Henrik Working on it. –  Noam Ross Apr 23 '13 at 17:14
    
That is some good news. You should be aware, that there is still a bug in the current implementation (but possibly not in R devel). –  Henrik Apr 23 '13 at 18:12
    
I've rewritten the function to deal with line numbers, and also to improve readability for long stacks. Get the code here: github.com/noamross/noamtools/blob/master/R/proftable.R –  Noam Ross May 2 '13 at 23:26
1  
@naught101 It's not an error. It's actually plyr::aaply. You can uncomment require(plyr) at the top of the function, or install the package which includes this at github.com/noamross/noamtools –  Noam Ross Jul 22 at 22:32

I currently have R uninstalled here, but in SPlus you can interrupt the execution with the Escape key, and then do traceback(), which will show you the call stack. That should enable you to use this handy method.

Here are some reasons why tools built on the same concepts as gprof are not very good at locating performance problems.

share|improve this answer
    
Looks like that question was deleted. Do you know of any other source of information on that topic (ways around these "warmed-over useless concepts", as you say in your comment above)? –  naught101 Feb 11 at 2:33
1  
@naught101: That post isn't gone, you just need enough rep. I'm the main flamer on this subject, and I'm really trying not to be. The other link here, "this handy method" spells it out without flaming too much. In a nutshell, no profiler can analyze a stack sample anywhere near as well as a human can, any bottleneck worth fixing can be found quickly, and fixing each bottleneck makes others easier to find, so you can keep rolling. "CPU profiling" misses IO. Recursion is not an issue. Accuracy of measurement is not important, nor is "self time", nor call counts, etc. etc. –  Mike Dunlavey Feb 11 at 3:32
    
Hrm. Sounds useful, but I'm a bit of a noob when it comes to profiling and related activities. It'd be great if someone with R isntalled could translate this answer into a method that I can use in R. –  naught101 Feb 11 at 5:20
2  
@naught101: Run rprof (you might have to rummage a bit for the doc). When I run it, I set the sample rate very low, so I don't get scads of samples. It generates a text file of stack samples. All I do is look at that. If you see it doing something on 5 out of 10 stack samples, that means if you could speed up what you see it doing, you could potentially save around 50% of time, give or take. That's a big saving. –  Mike Dunlavey Feb 11 at 6:09

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