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UPDATE

I reflected Microsoft.Cci.dll and build my rule. It works fine. However, I am facing some problem which I put here with all the details. Source code is here. I didn't want to increase the length of this question by putting all the details.

I am trying to write a code analysis rule which would raise warnings for methods having more than 100 lines. I am following this article. However, I am unable to count the number of lines by following the API provided by CodeAnalysis. for example,

public override ProblemCollection Check(Member member)
        {
            Method method = member as Method;
            if (method == null)
            {
                return null;
            }
            CheckForLOC(method);
            return Problems;
        }

Following is the CheckForLOC()

private void CheckForLOC(Method method)
    {
        int startLineForMethod = method.Body.SourceContext.StartLine;
        int endLineForMethod = method.Body.SourceContext.EndLine;
        if (endLineForMethod > startLineForMethod
            && ((endLineForMethod - startLineForMethod) > constMaximumLOCforAMethod))
        {
            Resolution resolution = GetResolution(method, constMaximumLOCforAMethod);
            Problem problem = new Problem(resolution);
            Problems.Add(problem);
        }
    }

In the above code, method.Body.SourceContext.StartLine and method.Body.SourceContext.EndLine return the same value. Not sure why.

I also tried using the StatementCollection :-

private void CheckForLOC(Method method)
        {
            int LOCPerMethod = 0;

            if (method.Body.Statements.Count >= 1)
            {
                foreach (var statement in method.Body.Statements)
                {
                    LOCPerMethod += GetNumberOfLinesPerStatement(statement);
                }

            }
            if (LOCPerMethod > constMaximumLOCforAMethod)
            {
                Resolution resolution = GetResolution(method, constMaximumLOCforAMethod);
                Problem problem = new Problem(resolution);
                Problems.Add(problem);
            }
        }

        private int GetNumberOfLinesPerStatement(Statement statement)
        {
            int LOCperStatement = 0;
            if (statement.SourceContext.EndLine > statement.SourceContext.StartLine)
            {
                LOCperStatement = statement.SourceContext.EndLine - statement.SourceContext.StartLine;
            }
            return LOCperStatement;
        }

Here also, Statement.SourceContext.StartLine and Statement.SourceContext.EndLine return the same value. I see that the StartLine for each statement is different and one needs to substract the StartLine value of the one statement from its previous one's. However, I see that result is erratic. For example, in the below snippet in a method, It gives me the line number of Statement1 as StartLineNumber whereas It should give the StartLineNumber of If(SomeCondition):-

if(SomeCondition)
{
   Statement1
   Statement2
   Statement3
}

Could anybody provide some direction on this?

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While this doesn’t answer your question, you could take a look at the tool NDepend (www.ndepend.com). It’s commercial code metrics tool that has a method size metric and many many more. –  Steven Sep 6 '10 at 12:46
    
@Steven, thanks for your time and the comments. Actually Visual Studio also has "Code Metrics" feature available. However, I wanted to build a rule which we can all follow and that should get integrated with the VS solution just like any other code analysis rule does. Hope this clarifies. –  Ashish Gupta Sep 6 '10 at 13:19
    
Okay, I'm starting to sound like a salesman now, but you can integrate NDepend with Visual Studio and your automated build process. However, having a license for each developer on the team can be a bit pricy :-). I wanting to have such a rule is a good thing, but isn't 100 lines a bit large? I try to have my methods under 10 lines of code on average. –  Steven Sep 6 '10 at 13:35
    
Ok, @Steven, the Salesman...:-) I am not sure If I can convince my manager for NDepend at this point of time. And 100 is just a number. :-) –  Ashish Gupta Sep 6 '10 at 13:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is more of a style rule than a correctness rule, so it would be a better candidate for a StyleCop rule than an FxCop rule.

That said, if you really want to implement it via FxCop, you should take a look at how the Microsoft.FxCop.Sdk.MethodMetrics.CalculateLinesOfCode(Method) accomplishes the same task.

share|improve this answer
    
I dont see Microsoft.FxCop.Sdk.MethodMetrics when I reflect FxCop.dll. Could you provide directions on where you saw that class? –  Ashish Gupta Sep 7 '10 at 13:46
1  
It's in the Microsoft.Cci assembly. –  Nicole Calinoiu Sep 7 '10 at 14:01
    
@Nicole, I updated my question. –  Ashish Gupta Sep 8 '10 at 9:33
    
@nicole - What version of Cci is this in? I don't see it in mine. C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\Team Tools\Static Analysis Tools\FxCop\Microsoft.Cci.dll –  Maslow Sep 13 '10 at 3:58
    
@Maslow: Microsoft.FxCop.Sdk.MethodMetrics.CalculateLinesOfCode(Method) is present in both the VS2008/FxCop 1.36 and VS2010/FxCop 10 versions of Microsoft.Cci. However, the Microsoft.FxCop.Sdk.MethodMetrics class has internal visibility, which may be why you're not "seeing" it (depending on how you're attempting to find it). –  Nicole Calinoiu Sep 13 '10 at 12:04

The tool NDepend supports the metric NbLinesOfCode on any .NET language. Also, it integrates in Visual Studio 2012, 2010, 2008. Disclaimer: I am one of the developers of the tool

You are asking for...

Creating a new rule to count number of lines in methods

With NDepend you can write Code Rules over LINQ Queries (namely CQLinq). Hence creating a new rule to count number of lines in methods, can be as simple as writing...

warnif count > 0 
from m in JustMyCode.Methods
where m.NbLinesOfCode > 10
orderby m.NbLinesOfCode descending 
select new { m, m.NbLinesOfCode }

...and get an immediate result in Visual Studio. Just by double-clicking a method in the result jumps to the method declaration in code:

enter image description here

Around 200 default CQLinq code queries and rules are proposed by default.

share|improve this answer
    
You know, I would love to use NDepend. Thats commercial product and the management might not agree for this, unfortunately. :-( –  Ashish Gupta Oct 20 '10 at 6:22
    
With a pricing starting at a few hundreds bucks hopefully the tool should pay off in less than a month. –  Patrick from NDepend team Oct 20 '10 at 9:27

I was looking for the same (to get total no of lines in a method) and I found solution.

Below is the sample:

public override ProblemCollection Check(Member member)
    {
        Method method = member as Method;
        if (method != null)
        {
            **if (method.Metrics.ClassCoupling > 20)**
            {
                Resolution resolu = GetResolution(new string[] { method.ToString() });
                Problems.Add(new Problem(resolu));
            }
        }
        return Problems;
    }

You can try method.Metrics.ClassCoupling to get the total lines a method.

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