Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Im working with PHP5, and I need to transform XML in the following form:

<item>
    <string isNewLine="1" lineNumber="32">some text in new line</string>
    <string>, more text</string>
    <item>
        <string isNewLine="1" lineNumber="33">some text in new line</string>
        <string isNewLine="1" lineNumber="34">some text</string>
        <string> in the same line</string>
        <string isNewLine="1" lineNumber="35">some text in new line</string>
    </item>
</item>

into something like this:

<item>
    <line lineNumber="32">some text in new line, more text</string>
    <item>
            <line lineNumber="33">some text in new line</string>
            <line lineNumber="34">some text in the same line</string>
            <line lineNumber="35">some text in new line</string>
    </item>
</item>

As you can see, it has joined the text contained in across multiple 'string' nodes. Also note that the 'string' nodes can be nested within other nodes at any level.

What are possible solutions for transforming source xml to the target xml?

Thanks,

share|improve this question
    
Check the comments to the accepted answer, the XSLT code there still has a bug. –  Tomalak Sep 6 '10 at 15:20
    
Good Question (+1). See my answer for the only correct solution. The solution you have accepted isn't correct at all -- just run it and compare the results with what you really wanted. –  Dimitre Novatchev Sep 6 '10 at 17:37
    
@isNewLine seems to be data redundant with @lineNumber: if a string has a @lineNumber it always has a @isNewLine and the reverse is true. –  dolmen Sep 9 '10 at 10:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is an efficient and correct solution:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:key name="knextStrings"
   match="string[not(@isNewLine)]"
   use="generate-id(preceding-sibling::string
                                 [@isNewLine][1]
                    )"/>


 <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
  <xsl:copy>
   <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
  </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="string[@isNewLine]">
  <line>
   <xsl:copy-of select="@*[not(name()='isNewLine')]"/>
   <xsl:copy-of select="text()
                       |
                        key('knextStrings',
                             generate-id()
                             )
                              /text()"/>
  </line>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="string[not(@isNewLine)]"/>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when this transformation is applied on the originally provided XML document:

<item>
    <string isNewLine="1" lineNumber="32">some text in new line</string>
    <string>, more text</string>
    <item>
        <string isNewLine="1" lineNumber="33">some text in new line</string>
        <string isNewLine="1" lineNumber="34">some text</string>
        <string> in the same line</string>
        <string isNewLine="1" lineNumber="35">some text in new line</string>
    </item>
</item>

the wanted, correct result is produced:

<item>
  <line lineNumber="32">some text in new line, more text</line>
  <item>
    <line lineNumber="33">some text in new line</line>
    <line lineNumber="34">some text in the same line</line>
    <line lineNumber="35">some text in new line</line>
  </item>
</item>
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for correct output and because this is what I was thinking ;) –  user357812 Sep 6 '10 at 18:37
    
+1 For an efficient and correct solution. –  Mads Hansen Sep 6 '10 at 18:56
    
This solution works of the box. Would be great if you could add comments to the code. –  Benjamin Ortuzar Sep 7 '10 at 9:10

This stylesheet produces the output you are looking for:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xsl:stylesheet xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform" version="1.0">
    <xsl:output indent="yes" />

    <!--Identity template simply copies content forward by default -->
    <xsl:template match="@*|node()">
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()"/>
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="string[@isNewLine and @lineNumber]">
        <line>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="@*"/>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="text()" />
            <!-- Include the text() from the string elements that come after this element,
                do not have @isNewLine or @lineNumber,
                and are only following this particular element -->
            <xsl:apply-templates select="following-sibling::string[not(@isNewLine and @lineNumber) and generate-id(preceding-sibling::string[1]) = generate-id(current())]/text()" />
        </line>
    </xsl:template>

    <!--Suppress the string elements that do not contain isNewLine or lineNumber attributes in normal processing-->
    <xsl:template match="string[not(@isNewLine and @lineNumber)]" />

    <!--Empty template to prevent attribute from being copied to output-->
    <xsl:template match="@isNewLine" />

</xsl:stylesheet>
share|improve this answer
    
+1 You should copy all but the isNewLine attribute. –  Tomalak Sep 6 '10 at 11:58
1  
@Mads Hansen: +1 For correct pattern. Minor edit: string to line transformation, strip @isNewLine and reduce predicate. –  user357812 Sep 6 '10 at 13:18
    
Thanks @Tomalak, good catch. @Alejandro, I added an empty template for @isNewLine. Feels more clean to me to have the empty template rather than excluding in the predicate filter(6 of one, half dozen of another). –  Mads Hansen Sep 6 '10 at 13:22
3  
@Mads: Also, there is another error: following-sibling::string[…] should be following-sibling::string[…][generate-id(preceding-sibling::string[1]) = generate-id(current())] for obvious reasons. Depending on the input, a following-sibling::string[1][…] could also be enough, but this is less clean so the OP would have to decide this. –  Tomalak Sep 6 '10 at 15:16
    
Thanks again, @Tomalak. I've updated the answer. –  Mads Hansen Sep 6 '10 at 17:17

You should look into an XML Parser for this. You could use either a SAX-based or DOM-based parser.

SAX is more efficient but DOM may suit your needs better as it's easier to work with.

share|improve this answer

Use an XSL Transformation.

From the PHP documentation:

<?php

$xml = new DOMDocument;
$xml->load('data.xml');

$xsl = new DOMDocument;
$xsl->load('trans.xsl');

$proc = new XSLTProcessor;
$proc->importStyleSheet($xsl);

echo $proc->transformToXML($xml);

?>

Use Dimitri's answer for trans.xsl.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.