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I keep on hearing this words 'callback' and 'postback' tossed around.
What is the difference between two ?

Is postback very specific to the ASP.NET pages ?

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5 Answers

up vote 130 down vote accepted

A Postback occurs when the data (the whole page) on the page is posted from the client to the server..ie the data is posted-back to the server, and thus the page is refreshed (redrawn)...think of it as 'sending the server the whole page (asp.net) full of data'.

On the other hand, a callback is also a special kind of postback, but it is just a quick round-trip to the server to get a small set of data (normally), and thus the page is not refreshed, unlike with the postback...think of it as 'calling the server, and receiving some data back'

With Asp.Net, the ViewState is not refreshed when a callback is invoked, unlike with a postback.

The reason that the whole page is posted with ASP.Net is because ASP.Net encloses the whole page in a <form> with a post method, and so when a submit button is clicked in the page, the form is sent ot the server with all of the fields that are in the form...basically the whole page itself

If you are using FireBug (for Firefox), you can actually see callbacks being invoked to the server in the Console. That way, you will see what specific data is being sent to the server (Request) and also the data the server sent you back (Response)


The below image illustrates the Page Life Cycles of both a postback and a callback in a ASP.NET based Website:

ASP.NET Page Life Cycles

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Actually, a callback is a more general programming term for a function that needs to be executed after another function has completed. –  Ryan Doherty Dec 14 '08 at 7:12
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It's when a pointer to a function gets passed to another function, that it will later invoke –  Andreas Grech Dec 14 '08 at 8:59
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Thanks for taking time to put a very nice explanatory diagram. –  Biswanath Dec 23 '08 at 11:10
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I agree - +1 for diagram –  barfoon Dec 23 '08 at 18:57
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+1 for the explanation and diagram –  etsuba Jan 6 '09 at 14:48
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A postback occurs when a request is sent from the client to the server for the same page as the one the user is currently viewing. When a postback occurs, the entire page is refreshed and you can see the typical progression on the progress bar at the bottom of the browser.

A callback, generally used with AJAX, occurs when a request is sent from the client to the server for which the page is not refreshed, only a part of it is updated without any flickering occuring on the browser

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I agree with Dreas' answer, but I'd like to add a couple of points. Postback is a term that gets introduced very recently by ASP .NET programming as Dreas explained, whereas callback is more generic and has been used way before web development exists. In fact I first heard about callback back in the days when I started programming in C (maybe the term existed before that, I don't know) and it simply means a pointer to function and this pointer to a function (name this A) gets passed to another function (name this B) which will later invoke A. Callback is also recently used by Yahoo UI Connection Manager and other Ajax frameworks but I believe the term had its first use back in the old C days.

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A postback is also a round trip basically when a postback is executed at that time it calls the special method which is known as round trip..Postback is on the server side where as round trip is on the client sid.

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A postback occurs when a request is sent to a server no need give details about security for each request.

When u make a request for the other page callback is used by the server

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