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I am trying to write a program in Java to know whether a machine is in Global/Private network or not. Below is my code snippet. I thought if a machine detects only loopback address(127.0.0.1 or ::1) then it can be assumed that machine is not in network. But in one of the System where multicast is enabled, I am getting following IP Addresses other than loop back address.

fe80::20c:29ff:fe90:8041
ff01::1,
ff02::1
ff02::1:ff90:8041
fe80::ffff:ffff:fffd
::1
fe80::1
127.0.0.1
224.0.0.1

Code snippet:

private static ArrayList< InetAddress > getInetAddresses( ) throws IPAddressException
    {

        ArrayList< InetAddress > arrayIPAddress = new ArrayList< InetAddress >( );

        try
        {
            Enumeration< NetworkInterface > networkInterfaces = NetworkInterface.getNetworkInterfaces( );

            if ( networkInterfaces == null )
            {
                throw new IPAddressException( "NetworkInterface Not found" );
            }

            while ( networkInterfaces.hasMoreElements( ) )
            {
                NetworkInterface card = ( NetworkInterface ) networkInterfaces.nextElement( );

                Enumeration< InetAddress > addresses = card.getInetAddresses( );

                if ( addresses == null )
                {
                    continue;
                }

                while ( addresses.hasMoreElements( ) )
                {
                    InetAddress inetAddress = ( InetAddress ) addresses.nextElement( );
                    arrayIPAddress.add( inetAddress );

                }
            }
        }
        catch ( SocketException obj )
        {
            throw new IPAddressException( "NetworkInterface Not found" );
        }

        return arrayIPAddress;
    }

IPConfig report:

C:\Documents and Settings\Administrator>ipconfig /all

Windows IP Configuration

   Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : vm13autopassdl1
   Primary Dns Suffix  . . . . . . . :
   Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Unknown
   IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
   WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
   DNS Suffix Search List. . . . . . : ind.hp.com
                                       india.hp.com

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection 2:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Intel(R) PRO/1000 MT Network Connection #
2
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-0C-29-90-80-41

Tunnel adapter Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : FF-FF-FF-FF-FF-FF-FF-FF
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
   IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : fe80::ffff:ffff:fffd%4
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :
   NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Disabled

Is there any other way to detect whethre machine is not in network?

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2 Answers 2

I would try to see if you can connect to a well-known site on the Internet (e.g., google.com, microsoft.com) using a well-known port (e.g., 80). If you can, then you're on the Internet; if you can't, then you might as well not be. Note that corporate firewall rules could still interfere with whatever you're trying to do -- even if you're on the Internet.

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If a corporate proxy forwards it, you're still not on the internet... :-) –  Etamar Laron May 31 '13 at 12:21

In addition to the loopback addresses 127.0.0.1 and ::1, you should also ignore:

  • IPv6 Link-local addresses - these start with fe8, fe9, fea or feb.
  • IPv4 Multicast addresses - these start with 224 through to 239.
  • IPv6 Multicast addresses - these start with ff.
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the response. –  Tripati Sep 7 '10 at 11:55
    
Thanks. But it is possible that ,a machine can have only linklocal address while it is in thenetwork.so filtering Link local address in this case will not work . Do you have any other solution to this ? –  Tripati Sep 7 '10 at 11:59
    
I think you need to clarify exactly what you mean by "is in the network". –  caf Sep 7 '10 at 12:57
    
In the network means , there should be way to ping or sending packets to the machine. –  Tripati Sep 7 '10 at 17:34
    
A machine can be in Private or Global network. Generally Site Local Addresses are used for Private networking and Global addresses are used for Global networking. Is it possible that a machine has configured to only multicast or LinkLocal address can be pinged/(packets can be sent) by any other machine outside? Could you please also confirm that if a machine doesn't detect any SiteLocal or Global IP addresses then it is not in any network.This answer will solve my problem? –  Tripati Sep 7 '10 at 17:45

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