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I'm writing an iPhone app, and I'm surprised that there seem to be no NSQueue or NSStack classes in Apple's Foundation Framework. I see that it would be quite easy to roll my own, starting with an NSMutableArray, so I'll do that unless I've missed something. Have I missed something?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 15 down vote accepted

as far as I know there is no generic class avaialbe. Try using the NSMutableArray, add via addObject and get first/last via objectAtIndex and removeObjectAtIndex.

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Here's my Stack class, in case it's useful to those who come after me. As you can see, the pop method involves enough code that you'd want to factor it out.

Stack.h:

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface Stack : NSObject {
    NSMutableArray *contents;
}

- (void)push:(id)object;
- (id)pop;

@end

Stack.m

#import "Stack.h"

@implementation Stack

// superclass overrides

- (id)init {
    if (self = [super init]) {
        contents = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
    }
    return self;
}

- (void)dealloc {
    [contents release];
    [super dealloc];
}

// Stack methods

- (void)push:(id)object {
    [contents addObject:object];
}

- (id)pop {
    id returnObject = [[contents lastObject] retain];
    if (returnObject) {
            [contents removeLastObject];
    }
    return [returnObject autorelease];
}

@end
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2  
For the pop method, you can save a little bit of typing by using [contents lastObject]. That'll return nil if the array is empty. I ended up implementing the methods as a category on NSMutableArray. Thanks for the code! –  Eric Andres Oct 18 '12 at 5:39
    
Sounds good - thanks for the tip. –  Tommy Herbert Oct 21 '12 at 18:52
1  
Personally, I'd probably just add the pop method to NSMutableArray via a category and use an NSMutableArray directly wherever I needed a stack, rather than creating an entirely new Stack class. Most languages I've used before don't have dedicated stack classes and use arrays as stacks. I suppose I can see the elegance from a readability perspective of having a class that can only be used as a stack, though. –  Mark Amery Aug 27 '13 at 16:40
    
Did you test the code change, Dario? –  Tommy Herbert May 6 at 11:30

I'm a bit late to this party, but are you aware of CHDataStructures?

http://cocoaheads.byu.edu/code/CHDataStructures

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2  
This is brilliant! Thanks for sharing! –  paiego Jan 2 '13 at 10:03

I have put a working iOS Objective C queue object on GitHub. The code was taken from various posts and by no means is owned by me.

https://github.com/esromneb/ios-queue-object/

If you see any problems please fork, and make a pull request!

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Yes, an NSMutableArray doubles as a stack or queue. (It would be slightly inefficient as a queue.)

You could also use C++'s stack and queue adapter, but it makes memory management a bit messy if you want to store Objective-C objects with it.

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Another easy way would be to extend NSMutableArray's capabilities by making use of Objective C's categories. You can do that by adding two files to your project:

StackExtension.h

@interface NSMutableArray (StackExtension)

- (void)push:(id)object;
- (id)pop;

@end

StackExtension.m

#import "StackExtension.h"

@implementation NSMutableArray (StackExtension)

- (void)push:(id)object {
    [self addObject:object];
}

- (id)pop {
    id lastObject = [self lastObject];
    [self removeLastObject];
    return lastObject;
}

@end

Now you can use a regular NSMutableArray in every other file of your project like a stack and call push or pop on that object. Don't forget to #import StackExtension.h in those files. Here is some sample code how you can use your new NSMutableArray as a stack:

NSMutableArray *myStack = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init]; // stack size = 0

NSString *aString = @"hello world";
[myStack push:myString];            // stack size = 1

NSString *anotherString = @"hello universe";
[myStack push:anotherString];       // stack size = 2

NSString *topMostStackObject; 

topMostStackObject = [myStack pop]; // stack size = 1
NSLog("%@",topMostStackObject);

topMostStackObject = [myStack pop]; // stack size = 0
NSLog("%@",topMostStackObject);

The log output will be:

hello universe
hello world
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No. You missed nothing. That's all. Objective-C is higher level language look like C. Low level control is not required.

Cocoa classes are designed for easier use than efficiency. If you want to deal with performance, you have an option of raw C (or C++) implementation. Otherwise, just use easy way. Of course, early-optimization is evil.

If you want a kind of encapsulation, just make a new class which contains NSMutableArray within it. Hide inner NSMutableArray and just expose what you want. But you'll realize this is unnecessary.

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1  
Thanks. It's code duplication I'm worried about, rather than encapsulation. –  Tommy Herbert Sep 7 '10 at 12:51
    
NOT using a queue is evil !, do you have any idea of the impact that has ? NSMutable arrays are NOT just designed for ease of use (they aren't easy to use AT ALL by the way !), they are actually efficient, and like mentioned above, can be used to implement queues. –  Pizzaiola Gorgonzola Aug 7 '13 at 10:21
    
@PizzaiolaGorgonzola I am sorry but it's very hard to understand what you really mean in this comment. And I never told Cocoa classes are inefficient. What I told was Cocoa classes are relatively less efficient and more easier to use when compared to their C (or C++) level counterparts. –  Eonil Aug 8 '13 at 3:46

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