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I wish to allocate more than MaxInteger bytes of memory.

Marshall.AllocHGlobal() expects an integer - so I cannot use this. Is there another way?

Update

I changed the platform to x64, and then I ran the code below.

myp appears to have the right length: about 3.0G. But stubbornly "buffer" maxes out at 2.1G.

Any idea why?

    var fileStream = new FileStream(
          "C:\\big.BC2",
          FileMode.Open,
          FileAccess.Read,
          FileShare.Read,
          16 * 1024,
          FileOptions.SequentialScan);
    Int64 length = fileStream.Length;
    Console.WriteLine(length);
    Console.WriteLine(Int64.MaxValue);
    IntPtr myp = new IntPtr(length);
    //IntPtr buffer = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(myp);
    IntPtr buffer = VirtualAllocEx(
        Process.GetCurrentProcess().Handle,
        IntPtr.Zero,
        new IntPtr(length),
        AllocationType.Commit | AllocationType.Reserve,
        MemoryProtection.ReadWrite);
    unsafe
    {
        byte* pBytes = (byte*)myp.ToPointer();
        var memoryStream = new UnmanagedMemoryStream(pBytes, (long)length, (long)length, FileAccess.ReadWrite);
        fileStream.CopyTo(memoryStream);
share|improve this question
12  
Why do you want to do this? – Lasse V. Karlsen Sep 6 '10 at 16:25
    
Doesn't it have an overload that receives an IntPtr? An IntPtr is a 64 bit value on 64 platforms, bigger than Int32.MaxInteger. – Vitor Sep 6 '10 at 16:26
    
Vitor, My test code fails on: IntPtr myp = new IntPtr(length); //length = 3 000 000 000 So it appears that it is NOT large on my 64bit machine... – ManInMoon Sep 6 '10 at 16:33
    
@ManInMoon, you also need to be targeting the 64bit platform for IntPtr to be 64 bit. Check the Build/Platform target option. – Chris Taylor Sep 6 '10 at 16:43
1  
If you can't set your platform to the 64-bit version, you aren't going to be able to get more than 2GB of memory. – Gabe Sep 6 '10 at 17:18

That's not possible on current mainstream hardware. Memory buffers are restricted to 2 gigabytes, even on 64-bit machines. Indexed addressing of the buffer is still done with a 32-bit signed offset. It is technically possible to generate machine code that can index more, using a register to store the offset, but that's expensive and slows down all array indexing, even for the ones that aren't larger than 2 GB.

Furthermore, you can't get a buffer larger than about 650MB out of the address space available to a 32-bit process. There aren't enough contiguous memory pages available because virtual memory contains both code and data at various addresses.

Companies like IBM and Sun sell hardware that can do this.

share|improve this answer
    
Are you sure about that? I don't have a machine with more than 2 GB nearby at the moment, so I can't test it, but everything I can find points to VirtualAlloc() being able to allocate more than 2 GB. As for actually addressing the buffer, that is a separate problem, but if it can be done for memory-mapped-files, so it can surely be done for normal memory, too. – Rasmus Faber Sep 6 '10 at 16:54
    
Interesting... Just read the Intel manuals, and indeed the displacement and immediate operand both have a maximum of 32 bits, even on x64. – wj32 Sep 7 '10 at 9:25
    
Anyway around it? – ManInMoon Sep 7 '10 at 12:56
    
    
@Hans Passant: That link actually contradicts you. Quote: "Use native allocations. You can always P/Invoke to NT’s native heap and allocate memory which you can then use unsafe code to access. [...] allocating an 8GB block [...]." – Rasmus Faber Sep 7 '10 at 15:15

I have been involved in one of the other questions you asked, and I honestly think you are fighting a losing battle here. You need to possibly explore other avenues of processing this data other than reading everything into memory.

If I understand correctly, you have multiple threads that process the data concurrently and that is why you do not want to work off the file directly because of I/O contention I assume.

Have you considered or would the possibility exist to reading a block of data into memory, have the threads process the block and then read the next block or processing by the threads? This way, at any one time, you never have more than a block in memory, but all threads can access the block. This is not optimal, but I put it out there as a starting point. If this is feasible then options to optimize this can be explored.

Update: Example using platform invoke to allocate unmanaged memory and use it from .NET.

Since you are are so certain you need to load this much data into memory I thought I would write a small test application to verify that this will work. For this you will need the following

  1. Compile with the /unsafe compile option
  2. If you want to allocate more that 2 GB you will also need to switch your target platform to x64

*Point 2 above is a little more complicated, on a 64-bit OS you could still target the x86 platform and get access to the full 4 GB memory. This will require you to use a tool like EDITBIN.EXE to set the LargeAddressAware flag in the PE header.

This code uses VirtualAllocEx to allocate unmanaged memory and UnmanagedMemoryStream to access the unmanaged memory using the .NET stream metaphor. Note this code has only had some very basic quick tests done and only on the target 64-bit environment with 4 GB RAM. And most importantly I only went up to about 2.6 GB memory utilization for the process.

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.ComponentModel;

namespace MemoryMappedFileTests
{
  class Program
  {
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
      IntPtr ptr = IntPtr.Zero;
      try
      {
        // Allocate and Commit the memory directly.
        ptr = VirtualAllocEx(
          Process.GetCurrentProcess().Handle, 
          IntPtr.Zero, 
          new IntPtr(0xD0000000L), 
          AllocationType.Commit | AllocationType.Reserve, 
          MemoryProtection.ReadWrite);
        if (ptr == IntPtr.Zero)
        {
          throw new Win32Exception(Marshal.GetLastWin32Error());
        }

        // Query some information about the allocation, used for testing.
        MEMORY_BASIC_INFORMATION mbi = new MEMORY_BASIC_INFORMATION();
        IntPtr result = VirtualQueryEx(
          Process.GetCurrentProcess().Handle, 
          ptr, 
          out mbi, 
          new IntPtr(Marshal.SizeOf(mbi)));
        if (result == IntPtr.Zero)
        {
          throw new Win32Exception(Marshal.GetLastWin32Error());
        }

        // Use unsafe code to get a pointer to the unmanaged memory. 
        // This requires compiling with /unsafe option.
        unsafe
        {
          // Pointer to the allocated memory
          byte* pBytes = (byte*)ptr.ToPointer();

          // Create Read/Write stream to access the memory.
          UnmanagedMemoryStream stm = new UnmanagedMemoryStream(
            pBytes, 
            mbi.RegionSize.ToInt64(), 
            mbi.RegionSize.ToInt64(), 
            FileAccess.ReadWrite);

          // Create a StreamWriter to write to the unmanaged memory.
          StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter(stm);
          sw.Write("Everything seems to be working!\r\n");
          sw.Flush();

          // Reset the stream position and create a reader to check that the 
          // data was written correctly.
          stm.Position = 0;
          StreamReader rd = new StreamReader(stm);
          Console.WriteLine(rd.ReadLine());
        }
      }
      catch (Exception ex)
      {
        Console.WriteLine(ex.ToString());
      }
      finally
      {
        if (ptr != IntPtr.Zero)
        {
          VirtualFreeEx(
            Process.GetCurrentProcess().Handle, 
            ptr, 
            IntPtr.Zero, 
            FreeType.Release);
        }
      }

      Console.ReadKey();
    }

    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true, ExactSpelling = true)]
    static extern IntPtr VirtualAllocEx(
      IntPtr hProcess, 
      IntPtr lpAddress,
      IntPtr dwSize, 
      AllocationType dwAllocationType, 
      MemoryProtection flProtect);

    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true, ExactSpelling = true)]
    static extern bool VirtualFreeEx(
      IntPtr hProcess, 
      IntPtr lpAddress, 
      IntPtr dwSize, 
      FreeType dwFreeType);

    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true, ExactSpelling = true)]
    static extern IntPtr VirtualQueryEx(
      IntPtr hProcess, 
      IntPtr lpAddress, 
      out MEMORY_BASIC_INFORMATION lpBuffer, 
      IntPtr dwLength);

    [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
    public struct MEMORY_BASIC_INFORMATION
    {
      public IntPtr BaseAddress;
      public IntPtr AllocationBase;
      public int AllocationProtect;
      public IntPtr RegionSize;
      public int State;
      public int Protect;
      public int Type;
    }

    [Flags]
    public enum AllocationType
    {
      Commit = 0x1000,
      Reserve = 0x2000,
      Decommit = 0x4000,
      Release = 0x8000,
      Reset = 0x80000,
      Physical = 0x400000,
      TopDown = 0x100000,
      WriteWatch = 0x200000,
      LargePages = 0x20000000
    }

    [Flags]
    public enum MemoryProtection
    {
      Execute = 0x10,
      ExecuteRead = 0x20,
      ExecuteReadWrite = 0x40,
      ExecuteWriteCopy = 0x80,
      NoAccess = 0x01,
      ReadOnly = 0x02,
      ReadWrite = 0x04,
      WriteCopy = 0x08,
      GuardModifierflag = 0x100,
      NoCacheModifierflag = 0x200,
      WriteCombineModifierflag = 0x400
    }

    [Flags]
    public enum FreeType
    {
      Decommit = 0x4000,
      Release = 0x8000
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Chris, but I effectively do that know but by reading into a 2D bytearray - therefore it's still all in mem. And process each bytearray separately. But it is very cumbersome and I have had to do some circus tricks to make it work. Given that I have 32G in this server - I am a bit miffed I can't use it directly... – ManInMoon Sep 6 '10 at 16:57
    
Hi Chris, thanks for code. I had to "answer" to show you my test code. Would you mind reading that please. – ManInMoon Sep 7 '10 at 9:42

This is not possible from managed code without a pinvoke call and for good reason. Allocating that much memory is usually a sign of a bad solution that needs revisiting.

Can you tell us why you think you need this much memory?

share|improve this answer
    
He's trying to read a file that doesn't fit in memory. – Hans Passant Sep 6 '10 at 16:32
2  
You should still not do it this way, the file should be read in portions. – Lasse V. Karlsen Sep 6 '10 at 16:35
1  
It's a long story!!! If you have the inclination - please have a look at my other questions - they are all on this same subject. You will find I detail the reason there. Many thanks – ManInMoon Sep 6 '10 at 16:35
    
JaredPar, could you point me at the Pinvoke call you were thinking of please – ManInMoon Sep 6 '10 at 16:39

Use Marshal.AllocHGlobal(IntPtr). This overload treats the value of the IntPtr as the amount of memory to allocate and IntPtr can hold a 64 bit value.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Rasmus - see Hans' comment below - pity! – ManInMoon Sep 6 '10 at 16:37

From a comment:

How do I create a second binaryreader that can read the same memorystream independantly?

var fileStream = new FileStream("C:\\big.BC2",
      FileMode.Open,
      FileAccess.Read,
      FileShare.Read,
      16 * 1024,
      FileOptions.SequentialScan);
    Int64 length = fileStream.Length;
    IntPtr buffer = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(length);
    unsafe
    {
        byte* pBytes = (byte*)myp.ToPointer(); 
        var memoryStream = new UnmanagedMemoryStream(pBytes, (long)length, (long)length, FileAccess.ReadWrite);
        var binaryReader = new BinaryReader(memoryStream);
        fileStream.CopyTo(memoryStream);
        memoryStream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
        // Create a second UnmanagedMemoryStream on the _same_ memory buffer
        var memoryStream2 = new UnmanagedMemoryStream(pBytes, (long)length, (long)length, FileAccess.Read);
        var binaryReader2 = new BinaryReader(memoryStream);
     }
share|improve this answer

If you can't make it work the way you want it to directly, create a class to provide the type of behaviour you want. So, to use big arrays:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;
using System.IO;

namespace BigBuffer
{
  class Storage
  {
    public Storage (string filename)
    {
      m_buffers = new SortedDictionary<int, byte []> ();
      m_file = new FileStream (filename, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.Read);
    }

    public byte [] GetBuffer (long address)
    {
      int
        key = GetPageIndex (address);

      byte []
        buffer;

      if (!m_buffers.TryGetValue (key, out buffer))
      {
        System.Diagnostics.Trace.WriteLine ("Allocating a new array at " + key);
        buffer = new byte [1 << 24];
        m_buffers [key] = buffer;

        m_file.Seek (address, SeekOrigin.Begin);
        m_file.Read (buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
      }

      return buffer;
    }

    public void FillBuffer (byte [] destination_buffer, int offset, int count, long position)
    {
      do
      {
        byte []
          source_buffer = GetBuffer (position);

        int
          start = GetPageOffset (position),
          length = Math.Min (count, (1 << 24) - start);

        Array.Copy (source_buffer, start, destination_buffer, offset, length);

        position += length;
        offset += length;
        count -= length;
      } while (count > 0);
    }

    public int GetPageIndex (long address)
    {
      return (int) (address >> 24);
    }

    public int GetPageOffset (long address)
    {
      return (int) (address & ((1 << 24) - 1));
    }

    public long Length
    {
      get { return m_file.Length; }
    }

    public int PageSize
    {
      get { return 1 << 24; }
    }

    FileStream
      m_file;

    SortedDictionary<int, byte []>
      m_buffers;
  }

  class BigStream : Stream
  {
    public BigStream (Storage source)
    {
      m_source = source;
      m_position = 0;
    }

    public override bool CanRead
    {
      get { return true; }
    }

    public override bool CanSeek
    {
      get { return true; }
    }

    public override bool CanTimeout
    {
      get { return false; }
    }

    public override bool CanWrite
    {
      get { return false; }
    }

    public override long Length
    {
      get { return m_source.Length; }
    }

    public override long Position
    {
      get { return m_position; }
      set { m_position = value; }
    }

    public override void Flush ()
    {
    }

    public override long Seek (long offset, SeekOrigin origin)
    {
      switch (origin)
      {
      case SeekOrigin.Begin:
        m_position = offset;
        break;

      case SeekOrigin.Current:
        m_position += offset;
        break;

      case SeekOrigin.End:
        m_position = Length + offset;
        break;
      }

      return m_position;
    }

    public override void SetLength (long value)
    {
    }

    public override int Read (byte [] buffer, int offset, int count)
    {
      int
        bytes_read = (int) (m_position + count > Length ? Length - m_position : count);

      m_source.FillBuffer (buffer, offset, bytes_read, m_position);

      m_position += bytes_read;
      return bytes_read;
    }

    public override void  Write(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count)
    {
    }

    Storage
      m_source;

    long
      m_position;
  }

  class IntBigArray
  {
    public IntBigArray (Storage storage)
    {
      m_storage = storage;
      m_current_page = -1;
    }

    public int this [long index]
    {
      get
      {
        int
          value = 0;

        index <<= 2;

        for (int offset = 0 ; offset < 32 ; offset += 8, ++index)
        {
          int
            page = m_storage.GetPageIndex (index);

          if (page != m_current_page)
          {
            m_current_page = page;
            m_array = m_storage.GetBuffer (m_current_page);
          }

          value |= (int) m_array [m_storage.GetPageOffset (index)] << offset;
        }

        return value;
      }
    }

    Storage
      m_storage;

    int
      m_current_page;

    byte []
      m_array;
  }

  class Program
  {
    static void Main (string [] args)
    {
      Storage
        storage = new Storage (@"<some file>");

      BigStream
        stream = new BigStream (storage);

      StreamReader
        reader = new StreamReader (stream);

      string
        line = reader.ReadLine ();

      IntBigArray
        array = new IntBigArray (storage);

      int
        value = array [0];

      BinaryReader
        binary = new BinaryReader (stream);

      binary.BaseStream.Seek (0, SeekOrigin.Begin);

      int
        another_value = binary.ReadInt32 ();
    }
  }
}

I split the problem into three classes:

  • Storage - where the actual data is stored, uses a paged system
  • BigStream - a stream class that uses the Storage class for its data source
  • IntBigArray - a wrapper around the Storage type that provides an int array interface

The above can be improved significantly but it should give you ideas about how to solve your problems.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Skizz - appreciate you sharing this – ManInMoon Sep 8 '10 at 13:18

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