Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose I have an XML-serializable class called Song:

[Serializable]
class Song
{
    public string Artist;
    public string SongTitle;
}

In order to save space (and also semi-obfuscate the XML file), I decide to rename the xml elements:

[XmlRoot("g")]
class Song
{
    [XmlElement("a")]
    public string Artist;
    [XmlElement("s")]
    public string SongTitle;
}

This will produce XML output like this:

<Song>
  <a>Britney Spears</a>
  <s>I Did It Again</s>
</Song>

I want to rename/remap the name of the class/object as well. Say, in the above example, I wish to rename the class Song to g. So that the resultant xml should look like this:

<g>
  <a>Britney Spears</a>
  <s>I Did It Again</s>
</g>

Is it possible to rename class-names via xml-attributes?

I don't wish to create/traverse the DOM manually, so I was wondering if it could be achieved via a decorator.

Thanks in advance!

UPDATE: Oops! This time I really did it again! Forgot to mention - I'm actually serializing a list of Song objects in the XML.

Here's the serialization code:

    public static bool SaveSongs(List<Song> songs)
    {
            XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(List<Song>));
            using (TextWriter textWriter = new StreamWriter("filename"))
            {
                serializer.Serialize(textWriter, songs);
            }
    }

And here's the XML output:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<ArrayOfSong>
<Song>
  <a>Britney Spears</a>
  <s>Oops! I Did It Again</s>
</Song>
<Song>
  <a>Rihanna</a>
  <s>A Girl Like Me</s>
</Song>
</ArrayOfSong>

Apparently, the XmlRoot() attribute doesn't rename the object in a list context.

Am I missing something?

share|improve this question
2  
I think there is an error in the XML. "I did it again" is not the correct title of the song. The correct title is; "Oops!...I Did It Again". (Just to prevent future frustrations with validators) –  Caspar Kleijne Sep 6 '10 at 18:09
2  
FYI, [Serializable] doesn't matter to XML Serialization. –  John Saunders Sep 6 '10 at 18:23
    
See my updated response based on your clarification. –  bobbymcr Sep 6 '10 at 19:05
    
It's been a few years, so it might be item to update the correct answer :) The answer currently marked as correct is actually incorrect for the question asked (and does not result in the desired output). XmlTypeAttribute and its TypeName property is the correct way to do it (see below). –  TrueBlueAussie Nov 20 '13 at 16:34
    
It's amazing how this questions evolve over time. The current text is not the original question or I would be crazy to answer what I did and invarbrass crazier for accepting my answer ;) –  Ariel Popovsky Sep 9 at 13:47

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Checkout the XmlRoot attribute.

Documentation can be found here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.xml.serialization.xmlrootattribute(v=VS.90).aspx

[XmlRoot(Namespace = "www.contoso.com", 
     ElementName = "MyGroupName", 
     DataType = "string", 
     IsNullable=true)]
public class Group

UPDATE: Just tried and it works perfectly on VS 2008. This code:

[XmlRoot(ElementName = "sgr")]
public class SongGroup
{
    public SongGroup()
    {
       this.Songs = new List<Song>();
    }



[XmlElement(ElementName = "sgs")]
    public List<Song> Songs { get; set; }
}

[XmlRoot(ElementName = "g")]
public class Song
{
    [XmlElement("a")]
    public string Artist { get; set; }

    [XmlElement("s")]
    public string SongTitle { get; set; }
} 

Outputs:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<sgr xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:xsd="http://www
.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
  <sgs>
    <a>A1</a>
    <s>S1</s>
  </sgs>
  <sgs>
    <a>A2</a>
    <s>S2</s>
  </sgs>
</sgr>
share|improve this answer
1  
I've already tried the XmlRoot attribute. Didn't work. –  invarbrass Sep 6 '10 at 18:10
    
Thanks! This is a better solution! –  invarbrass Sep 8 '10 at 14:34
6  
@Arial: Had the same problem but found the XmlRoot attribute only works on my root node (as I guess it should based on the docs). Not sure how you got the above code to work properly. Got it to work with [XmlType(TypeName = "newName")] on my classes instead. –  TrueBlueAussie Mar 11 '11 at 13:25
1  
The Output is not correct you loose a <g>...</g> but this not solve the problem. The solution is the post of "HiTech Magic" [XmlType(TypeName="g")] –  Riccardo Bassilichi Aug 8 '13 at 11:41
    
@Ariel Popovsky, what if i want Song to be an element named "g" and Artist and SongTitle to be attributes on that element. IE, <sgr><sgs><g a="A1" s="S1" /><g a="A2" s="S2"><sgs><sgr> –  theB3RV Sep 4 at 14:46

Solution: Use [XmlType(TypeName="g")]

XmlRoot only works with XML root nodes as per the documentation (and what you would expect, given its name includes root)!

I was unable to get any of the other answers to work so kept digging...

Instead I found that the XmlTypeAttribute (i.e. [XmlType]) and its TypeName property do a similar job for non-root classes/objects.

e.g.

[XmlType(TypeName="g")]
class Song
{
    public string Artist;
    public string SongTitle;
}

Assuming you apply it to the other classes e.g.:

[XmlType(TypeName="a")]
class Artist
{
    .....
}

[XmlType(TypeName="s")]
class SongTitle
{
    .....
}

This will output the following exactly as required in the question:

<g>
  <a>Britney Spears</a>
  <s>I Did It Again</s>
</g>

I have used this in several production projects and found no problems with it.

share|improve this answer
    
I cannot see any disadvantages caused by this solution ... I like it really much! –  WoIIe Jul 14 at 11:51

If this is the root element of the document, you can use [XmlRoot("g")].


Here is my updated response based on your clarification. The degree of control you are asking for is not possible without a wrapping class. This example uses a SongGroup class to wrap the list so that you can give alternate names to the items within.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.IO;
using System.Xml.Serialization;

public class SongGroup
{
    public SongGroup()
    {
        this.Songs = new List<Song>();
    }

    [XmlArrayItem("g", typeof(Song))]
    public List<Song> Songs { get; set; }
}

public class Song 
{ 
    public Song()
    {
    }

    [XmlElement("a")] 
    public string Artist { get; set; }

    [XmlElement("s")]
    public string SongTitle { get; set; }
} 

internal class Test
{
    private static void Main()
    {
        XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(SongGroup));

        SongGroup group = new SongGroup();
        group.Songs.Add(new Song() { Artist = "A1", SongTitle = "S1" });
        group.Songs.Add(new Song() { Artist = "A2", SongTitle = "S2" });

        using (Stream stream = new MemoryStream())
        using (StreamWriter writer = new StreamWriter(stream))
        {
            serializer.Serialize(writer, group);
            stream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
            using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(stream))
            {
                Console.WriteLine(reader.ReadToEnd());
            }
        }
    }
}

This has the side effect of generating one more inner element representing the list itself. On my system, the output looks like this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<SongGroup xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
  <Songs>
    <g>
      <a>A1</a>
      <s>S1</s>
    </g>
    <g>
      <a>A2</a>
      <s>S2</s>
    </g>
  </Songs>
</SongGroup>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the elaborate code & explanation! –  invarbrass Sep 6 '10 at 19:54
    
I realise this is a very old question/answer, but the specific output they wanted is available with XmlType(TypeName="g")]. You do not need a wrapping class and can just attribute the classes themselves. Cheers. –  TrueBlueAussie Aug 8 '13 at 15:09
[XmlRoot("g")]
class Song
{
}

Should do the trick

share|improve this answer
    
Song is not the Root element, so this will not work. XmlRoot only applies at the root node. Sorry. –  TrueBlueAussie Aug 9 '13 at 10:41

Use XmlElementAttribute: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.xml.serialization.xmlrootattribute.aspx

[Serializable]
[XmlRoot(ElementName="g")]
class Song
{
    public string Artist;
    public string SongTitle;
}

should work.

share|improve this answer
    
Song is not the Root element, so this will not work. XmlRoot only applies at the root node. Sorry. –  TrueBlueAussie Aug 9 '13 at 10:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.