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#include "stdio.h"
#include "conio.h"

void swap(int *x,int *y);

void main()
{
int a=10,b=20;
swap(a,b);
printf("value of a=%d and b=%d");
getch();
}

void swap(int *x,int *y)

{
  if(x!=y)
     {
      *x ^= *y;
         *y ^= *x;
         *x ^= *y;

     }
}

// I'm getting .. cann't convert int to int * ...

can anybody tell me why so . and how to solve it regards.

hoping for quick and positive response.

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1  
Your call to printf() is also missing arguments. It should be printf("value of a=%d and b=%d", a, b);. –  Jonathan Grynspan Sep 6 '10 at 19:46
3  
Apart from your problem at hand, some remarks: conio is not a standard header, stdio should not be included via double quotes and void main is not in the standard, either. While it may work in your given toolchain, writing portable and standard conformant code is probably a good idea. –  Jim Brissom Sep 6 '10 at 20:06
    
Which language are you aiming for? Don't just tag language tags on. And get a book, sounds like you need to learn fundamentals. –  GManNickG Sep 6 '10 at 23:27
    
Unrelated to the question, you should not be using that swap algorithm unless you know full well what it does and why. You should read up about it: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xor_swap –  Itai Ferber Sep 7 '10 at 0:13
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1 Answer 1

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Your call to swap() should be swap(&a,&b);

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Yes, just what i was gonna say, so +1 –  Richard J. Ross III Sep 6 '10 at 19:32
2  
or equivalently void swap(int *x,int *y) should be void swap(int & x,int & y) (along with modified body of course) –  doc Sep 6 '10 at 19:34
2  
@doc: This is not true for C, which is also one of the tags (just to be complete and pedantic) –  Nathan Fellman Sep 6 '10 at 19:37
7  
I think the correct solution to the whole delimma is for people to actually decide what language they are using. Contrary to popular belief, C code is not the same as C++ code. –  alternative Sep 6 '10 at 19:54
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