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Can any one tell me what the difference is between the isKindOfClass:(Class)aClass and the isMemberOfClass:(Class)aClass functions? I know it is something small like, one is global while the other is an exact class match but I need someone to specify which is which please.

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up vote 193 down vote accepted

isKindOfClass: returns YES if the receiver is an instance of the specified class or an instance of any class that inherits from the specified class.

isMemberOfClass: returns YES if the receiver is an instance of the specified class.

Most of the time you want to use isKindOfClass: to ensure that your code also works with subclasses.

The NSObject Protocol Reference talks a little more about these methods.

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2  
thanks it helped me a lot. thanks again. – Kamarshad Feb 21 '12 at 6:53
    
Basics.... Are really helpful while developing. – Siten Nov 17 '14 at 4:56
    
Can you please clear my below doubt? if ([lbl.textColor isMemberOfClass:[UIColor class]]) { // Not Memeber NSLog(@"Not Memeber"); }else { NSLog(@"Not Memeber"); } if ([imgView.image isMemberOfClass:[UIImage class]]) {// Memeber NSLog(@"Memeber"); }else { NSLog(@"Not Memeber"); } – Nikkie Dec 19 '14 at 14:39
  • isKindOfClass: indicates whether an object inherits from a given class
  • isMemberOfClass: indicates whether an object is an instance of a given class.

[[NSMutableData data] isKindOfClass:[NSData class]]; // YES
[[NSMutableData data] isMemberOfClass:[NSData class]]; // NO
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thank you this is very useful my concept – Durga Jul 27 '11 at 9:43
    
@Durga, if this answers your question, you should accept it. Read more about accepting rate here: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/16721/… – poncha Jan 18 '13 at 15:25
    
if I only had known that earlier... I just spend hours on some issues that now totally make sense :) – pmk Mar 19 '13 at 14:56

Suppose

@interface A : NSObject 
@end

@interface B : A
@end

...

id b = [[B alloc] init];

then

[b isKindOfClass:[A class]] == YES;
[b isMemberOfClass:[A class]] == NO;

Basically, -isMemberOfClass: is true if the instance is exactly of the specified class, while -isKindOfClass: is true if the instance is exactly of the specified class or if one of the instance's ancestors is of the specified class.

-isMemberOfClass: is seldom used.

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2  
very appropriate ..... thanks Kenny TM – Kamarshad Feb 21 '12 at 6:53
1  
But if you have an array of subviews which include UIViews and a UISegmentedControl and you looped through them and set a conditional on class you would need to use isMemberOfClas UIView and isMemberOfClass UISegmentedControl to distinguish between them, no? isKindOfClass would see the UISegmentedControl as a UIView. – PruitIgoe Aug 1 '13 at 18:36
    
@Pruitlgoe that is very true. You might use isKindOfClass:[UIView class] to ensure that all objects you are dealing with are UIViews but you would need to use isMemberOfClass:[UIView class] and/or isMemberOfClass:[UISegmentedControl class] inside some conditional statement to indicate any distinct implementation of the views based on their immediate instance class – Thom Morgan Jul 2 '14 at 13:48

isKindOfClass: Returns a Boolean value that indicates whether the receiver is an instance of given class or an instance of any class that inherits from that class.

isMemberOfClass: Returns a Boolean value that indicates whether the receiver is an instance of a given class.

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isKindOfClass-> return YES when the object is instance of that class or instance of a class which is inherited from it.

isMemberOfClass: return YES when the object is instance of that class but No in case: instance of a class which is inherited from it.

example is good enough in jtbandes answer.

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Because of class clusters, isMemberOfClass can give you an answer you might not expect. In many cases your best choice is more likely to be -(BOOL)conformsToProtocol:(SEL)aSelector or - (BOOL)conformsToProtocol:(Protocol*)aProtocol. I.e, it's better to test these if they can answer your need rather than testing class/subclass.

See apple doc for NSObject class and protocol:

http://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/Cocoa/Reference/Foundation/Classes/NSObject_Class/Reference/Reference.html#//apple_ref/occ/cl/NSObject

http://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/Cocoa/Reference/Foundation/Protocols/NSObject_Protocol/Reference/NSObject.html#//apple_ref/occ/intf/NSObject

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