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A friend and I are going back and forth with brain-teasers and I have no idea how to solve this one. My assumption is that it's possible with some bitwise operators, but not sure.

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Should have mentioned that no operators can be used. So 4--3 doesn't work. –  user23126 Dec 13 '08 at 18:15
    
curses! Look up binary addition... Apart from keeping track of the carry flag, it can be done with simple boolean operations. –  Andrew Rollings Dec 13 '08 at 18:17
    
Thanks Andrew, I have looked at binary addition and can do it on paper, but am having trouble coming up with an algorithm in code. –  user23126 Dec 13 '08 at 18:19
    
Well, if you can do it on paper, write out each step and generate pseudocode... Basically you should be able to loop through the bits and add them, making sure you keep the carry bit for the next bit in the loop... At the end of it, you'll have your result. –  Andrew Rollings Dec 13 '08 at 18:22
2  
i'm going to use std::plus<int>()(a, b) –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 13 '08 at 20:08

13 Answers 13

up vote 21 down vote accepted

In C, with bitwise operators:

#include<stdio.h>

int add(int x, int y) {
    int a, b;
    do {
        a = x & y;
        b = x ^ y;
        x = a << 1;
        y = b;
    } while (a);
    return b;
}


int main( void ){
    printf( "2 + 3 = %d", add(2,3));
    return 0;
}
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Thank you. I am afraid to ask, but does subtraction work similarly? I read that I can just add the two's complement. But when I try to, say, subtract 6-3, and turn that into 6+(-3) using two's complement, I get an infinite loop in the above algorithm. –  user23126 Dec 13 '08 at 18:39
    
add(6, -3) should work, you can play with the code here: codepad.org/iWSRSsUn –  CMS Dec 13 '08 at 18:43
    
Left shifting a negative value is undefined behavior, it will work as expected on many processors but it isn't guaranteed, you should point this out in your answer. Also, can you add a \n to your printf statement? Aside from that, nice answer. –  Robert Gamble Dec 13 '08 at 19:23
    
I tried converting your algorithm into Python (codepad.org/pb8IuLnY) and am experiencing an infinite loop when a negative number is passed in (i.e. the subtract). Are Python's operators any different than C? –  user23126 Dec 13 '08 at 20:13
    
@pomeranian.myopenid.com, it is most likely due to the way the left-shift operator is handled in Python. Instead of reaching an upper limit on the integer bits, and setting the highest bit to make a number negative, it becomes positive long integers. –  Lara Dougan Dec 14 '08 at 18:24

No + right?

int add(int a, int b) 
{
   return -(-a) - (-b);
}
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2  
In the question comments, @pomeranian.myopenid.com mentions that no arithmetic operators can be used. Besides, it would be better put as a - (-b) to use subtraction as the substitute operation. –  Lara Dougan Dec 13 '08 at 19:17
int add(int a, int b) {
   const char *c=0;
   return &(&c[a])[b];
}
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+1 nice cheat... misusing pointer and array arithmetics to do addition... –  nalply Sep 20 '11 at 11:43
1  
I didn't quite understand how this one works, an explanation would be great! –  ffledgling Oct 24 '13 at 23:21

Define "best". Here's a python version:

len(range(x)+range(y))

The + there is list catenation, not addition.

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Cheat. You could negate the number and subract it from the first :)

Failing that, look up how a binary adder works. :)

EDIT: Ah, saw your comment after I posted.

Details of binary addition are here.

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Note, this would be for an adder known as a ripple-carry adder, which works, but does not perform optimally. Most binary adders built into hardware are a form of fast adder such as a carry-look-ahead adder.

My ripple-carry adder works for both unsigned and 2's complement integers if you set carry_in to 0, and 1's complement integers if carry_in is set to 1. I also added flags to show underflow or overflow on the addition.

#define BIT_LEN 32
#define ADD_OK 0
#define ADD_UNDERFLOW 1
#define ADD_OVERFLOW 2

int ripple_add(int a, int b, char carry_in, char* flags) {
    int result = 0;
    int current_bit_position = 0;
    char a_bit = 0, b_bit = 0, result_bit = 0;

    while ((a || b) && current_bit_position < BIT_LEN) {
        a_bit = a & 1;
        b_bit = b & 1;
        result_bit = (a_bit ^ b_bit ^ carry_in);
        result |= result_bit << current_bit_position++;
        carry_in = (a_bit & b_bit) | (a_bit & carry_in) | (b_bit & carry_in);
        a >>= 1;
        b >>= 1;
    }

    if (current_bit_position < BIT_LEN) {
        *flags = ADD_OK;
    }
    else if (a_bit & b_bit & ~result_bit) {
        *flags = ADD_UNDERFLOW;
    }
    else if (~a_bit & ~b_bit & result_bit) {
        *flags = ADD_OVERFLOW;
    }
    else {
        *flags = ADD_OK;
    }

    return result;
}
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Wow, I'll try this out. Thanks! –  user23126 Dec 13 '08 at 19:48
    
Unfortunately the increment operator (current_bit_position++) requires addition. Nitpicky, I know. –  user23126 Dec 14 '08 at 16:50
1  
@pomeranian.myopenid.com yeah, that is true in this case. In hardware, there is separate logic gates for each bit, and doesn't use a loop. If this loop were to be unrolled, you could use it without the ++ operator. –  Lara Dougan Dec 14 '08 at 18:17
    
@Lara: Yes, unroll. For 32 bits it would be 32 copies of the code within the while-loop. This would give a nice hardware pseudocode and a bonus point: it is even executable! Programming hardware follows different rules than programming software, so some best practices don't apply here... –  nalply Sep 20 '11 at 11:39

Why not just incremet the first number as often, as the second number?

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Incrementing is just adding 1, so the original issue still exists. –  user23126 Dec 13 '08 at 18:17
    
not really, INC and ADD are to different opcodes in machine language ;) –  sindre j Dec 13 '08 at 23:21

CMS's add() function is beautiful. It should not be sullied by unary negation (a non-bitwise operation, tantamount to using addition: -y==(~y)+1). So here's a subtraction function using the same bitwise-only design:

int sub(int x, int y) {
    unsigned a, b;
    do {
        a = ~x & y;
        b =  x ^ y;
        x = b;
        y = a << 1;
    } while (a);
    return b;
}
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The reason ADD is implememted in assembler as a single instruction, rather than as some combination of bitwise operations, is that it is hard to do. You have to worry about the carries from a given low order bit to the next higher order bit. This is stuff that the machines do in hardware fast, but that even with C, you can't do in software fast.

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an abacus will do this quite well, and it doesn't use any electricity!

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Adding two integers is not that difficult; there are many examples of binary addition online.

A more challenging problem is floating point numbers! There's an example at http://pages.cs.wisc.edu/~smoler/x86text/lect.notes/arith.flpt.html

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You can do it using bit-shifting and the AND operation.

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    unsigned int x = 3, y = 1, sum, carry;
    sum = x ^ y; // Ex - OR x and y
    carry = x & y; // AND x and y
    while (carry != 0) {
        carry = carry << 1; // left shift the carry
        x = sum; // initialize x as sum
        y = carry; // initialize y as carry
        sum = x ^ y; // sum is calculated
        carry = x & y; /* carry is calculated, the loop condition is
                        evaluated and the process is repeated until
                        carry is equal to 0.
                        */
    }
    printf("%d\n", sum); // the program will print 4
    return 0;
}
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Implemented in same way as we might do binary addition on paper.

int add(int x, int y)
{
    int t1_set, t2_set;
    int carry = 0;
    int result = 0;
    int mask = 0x1;

    while (mask != 0) {
        t1_set = x & mask;
        t2_set = y & mask;
        if (carry) {
           if (!t1_set && !t2_set) {
               carry = 0;
               result |= mask;
           } else if (t1_set && t2_set) {
               result |= mask;
           }
        } else {
           if ((t1_set && !t2_set) || (!t1_set && t2_set)) {
                result |= mask;
           } else if (t1_set && t2_set) {
                carry = 1;
           }
        }
        mask <<= 1;
    }
    return (result);
}

Improved for speed would be below::

int add_better (int x, int y)
{
  int b1_set, b2_set;
  int mask = 0x1;
  int result = 0;
  int carry = 0;

  while (mask != 0) {
      b1_set = x & mask ? 1 : 0;
      b2_set = y & mask ? 1 : 0;
      if ( (b1_set ^ b2_set) ^ carry)
          result |= mask;
      carry = (b1_set &  b2_set) | (b1_set & carry) | (b2_set & carry);
      mask <<= 1;
  }
  return (result);
}
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