Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Whilst reading through K&R, I came across the integer to string function. I gave it a quick read, and decided to implement it myself, but instead of printing, it updates a character array.

Here is what I have

void inttostr(int number, char str[]) {
    static int i;  
    if (number / 10) {
        inttostr(number / 10, str); 
    }       
    str[i++] =  number % 10 + '0';      
}

It seemed to work for the few integers I gave it, but I have some questions.

  1. I haven't explicitly included the nul byte \0 at the end, so why does the string work fine when printed with printf("%s\n", str);?
  2. I don't think I'm very good at thinking recursively. When I try and step through the program in my mind, I lose track of what is still awaiting execution. Is there a better way of seeing what is happening internally, to help me learn?
  3. Any other suggestions on the code?

I'm using Xcode.

This is not homework. I'm just learning.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Wouldn't it be easier to use itoa()? –  Alexander Rafferty Sep 7 '10 at 1:47
    
@Alexander If that is something in a standard library, then you are probably correct. However, I'm learning by doing, so calling the library function won't let me learn how it may work internally. –  alex Sep 7 '10 at 1:49
2  
itoa is not standard, and it seems like this is an educational exercise. –  Matthew Flaschen Sep 7 '10 at 2:04
    
itoa is not a standard function, but (for future reference) sprintf is. –  Steve Jessop Sep 7 '10 at 2:05
2  
"I don't think I'm very good at thinking recursively" - the combination of recursion with a static local variable made me pause a second. Maybe try re-writing without that, but instead inttostr returns the number of characters it has written. It might then be easier to consider the recursive steps separately, since they no longer share state. You will then be tempted to have two functions - one which nul-terminates and a self-recursive one which doesn't. –  Steve Jessop Sep 7 '10 at 2:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're correct that you're never writing NUL, which is a bug.

In general, you don't have to think through the entire solution. You just have to make sure every step is correct. So in this case, you say:

1 . inttostr(number / 10, str);

will take care of all but the last digit.

2 . Then I will take care of the last one.

You can trace what's happening, though. For e.g. 54321 it looks like:

inttostr(54321, str); // str = ...;
inttostr(5432, str); // str = ...;
inttostr(543, str); // str = ...;
inttostr(54, str); // str = ...;
inttostr(5, str); // str = ...;
str[0] = '5'; // str = "5...";
str[1] = '4'; // str = "54...";
str[2] = '3'; // str = "543...";
str[3] = '2'; // str = "5432...";
str[4] = '1'; // str = "54321...";

Note that when you don't return from any of the functions until you write the first character, then you return in the opposite order from the calls.

The ... signifies that you haven't NUL-terminated. Another issue is that you're using a static variable, so your code isn't reentrant; this means it breaks in certain scenarios, including multi-threading.

To address the reentrancy and NUL issue, you can do something like the code below. This creates a helper function, and passes the current index to write.

void inttostr_helper(int number, char str[], int *i)
{
    if (number / 10) {
        inttostr_helper(number / 10, str, i); 
    }       
    str[(*i)++] =  number % 10 + '0';
    str[*i] = '\0';
}

void inttostr(int number, char str[])
{
  int i = 0;
  inttostr_helper(number, str, &i);
}

EDIT: Fixed non-static solution.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Matthew. So, do you know why it may still be printing correctly despite not being nul terminated? I have since added the line str[i] = '\0';. –  alex Sep 7 '10 at 2:02
2  
@alex, you just got "lucky. If you do a memset before-hand (e.g. memset(str, '-', num_chars); it will be easier to see the problem. –  Matthew Flaschen Sep 7 '10 at 2:11

I am impressed of the creativity to use recursive, despite that it is not necessary. I think the code should remove statically-allocated i variable because this variable will persist through calls. So the second time you use this function from your code, e.g. from main(), it will not be initiated and will be the same value from previous call. I would suggest using return value as follow:

int inttostr(int number, char *str) {
   int idx = 0;
   if (number / 10) {
        idx = inttostr(number / 10, str); 
   }       
   str[idx++] =  number % 10 + '0';
   return idx;
}
share|improve this answer

1, Your compiler (especially in debug mode) may have filled str with 0. Unix does this if you allocate memory with new() - But don't rely on this, either set the first byte to \0 or memset everything to 0

2, paper + pencil. Draw a table with each variable across the top and time down the side.

3, Write the simplest, longest version first, then get clever.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Martin. For 1, should I include the \0 at the end to be sure it will work on all machines. For 2, when you say time, do you mean level of recursion it is in? –  alex Sep 7 '10 at 1:48
    
I thought that unixes tended to clear memory only when it is first allocated to the process (or used as stack). If your program has previously freed some memory (or been that deep on the stack), then even with this measure in place, you can allocate memory which isn't zeroed, instead it contains whatever you (or the call stack) left there. Yes, you should always write the 0 byte yourself, don't rely on implementation-specific behaviour. –  Steve Jessop Sep 7 '10 at 2:03
  • I haven't explicitly included the nul byte \0 at the end, so why does the string work fine when printed with printf("%s\n", str);?

how is the original char array declared when you call your function the first time? if it is a static char array then it will be filled with 0's and that would explain why it works, otherwise its just "luck"

  • I don't think I'm very good at thinking recursively. When I try and step through the program in my mind, I lose track of what is still awaiting execution. Is there a better way of seeing what is happening internally, to help me learn?

honestly, I am not sure if anybody is good in thinking recursively :-)

share|improve this answer
    
I declared it as char str[30]. Does this mean each of the 30 members will have a null byte? As for the second one, well you know what I mean! :) –  alex Sep 7 '10 at 1:54
    
It only means that you allocated room for 30 bytes. Their initial values are NULs only if str is declared as a global or static, but not if it is an automatic. –  RBerteig Sep 7 '10 at 1:58

Did you try drawing the execution step by step?

share|improve this answer
    
I did, and it sort of clicked. But I thought there may be a better way than that. –  alex Sep 7 '10 at 1:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.