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I'm trying to search plain old strings for urls that begin with http, but all the regex I find doesn't seem to work in javascript nor can I seem to find an example of this in javascript.

This is the one I'm trying to use from here and here:

var test = /\b(?:(?:https?|ftp|file)://www\.|ftp\.)[-A-Z0-9+&@#/%=~_|$?!:,.]*[A-Z0-9+&@#/%=~_|$]/;

But when I try to run it, I get "Unexpected token |" errors.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Ok, a comment seems to be not enough, hard to find full answer. I rewrite whole proper regexp: (tested, it works good)

var test = /\b(?:(?:https?|ftp|file):\/\/www\.|ftp\.)[-A-Z0-9+&@#\/%=~_|$?!:,.]*[A-Z0-9+&@#\/%=~_|$]/i;

The i on the end means 'ignore case', so it is necessary for this regexp.

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1  
Might be useful to note that adding a | before www will make the www optional. – AdamB Sep 7 '10 at 2:27
    
This will fail on url's with parentheses – Jason Axelson Dec 20 '13 at 20:38

You're using / as your regex delimiter, and are also using / within the regex (before www), so the regex actually terminates after the first / before www. Change it to:

var test = /\b(?:(?:https?|ftp|file):\/\/www\.|ftp\.)[-A-Z0-9+&@#/%=~_|$?!:,.]*[A-Z0-9+&@#/%=~_|$]/;
                                     ^^^^ escape here
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1  
not only there, there are some '/' chars later too – pepkin88 Sep 7 '10 at 2:00
    
forgot to mention, this regexp is case insensitive, so you would rather write this: var test = /\b(?:(?:https?|ftp|file):\/\/www\.|ftp\.)[-A-Z0-9+&@#\/%=~_|$?!:,.]*[A-Z0-9+&@#‌​\/%=~_|$]/i; – pepkin88 Sep 7 '10 at 2:08

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