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I'm not too familiar with c++ and how instantiating objects work, so this is probably a very simple thing to solve. When I compile with g++ I get the error " undefined reference to 'Foo::Foo(std::string)' ". I want to create an instance of the class Foo that has a string parameter in its constructor. Here is the code:

Foo.h

#include <string>
using namespace std;

class Foo
{
    public:
        Foo(string s);

    private:
        string id;
};

Foo.cpp

#include <string>
#include "Foo.h"
using namespace std;

Foo::Foo(string s)
{
    id = s;
}

main.cpp

#include <string>
#include "Foo.h"
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    Foo foo("bar");

    return 0;
}
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5  
Please don't use using in header files. Also, std::string should be passed as foo(std::string const &s). –  Pavel Radzivilovsky Sep 7 '10 at 5:44
1  
sorry but why don't use 'using' in header files? –  RvdK Sep 7 '10 at 5:56
1  
Because using in header files will pollute the global namespace with the "using"-types in every compilation unit that includes the header –  Markus Kull Sep 7 '10 at 6:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You're probably not including Foo.cpp in your compile line. It should look something like this:

g++ main.cpp Foo.cpp -o testFoo
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Well, it's the lesson I get for compiling command line in a language I'm unfamiliar with; thanks for saving me even more time hunting this down :) –  Aaron Sep 7 '10 at 6:55

Not related to the problem you were having but consider making a couple minor changes:

  1. Pass the argument in a const reference. const because you do not plan on changing the value of the argument and reference so that you do not create any additional temporary objects.

  2. C++ has an initializer concept that is more efficient then using the assignment operator on member 'id' in the body of the constructor. The current version of the constructor will call member id's default constructor and then its assignment constructor. The initializer concept (i.e. 'id(s)') will just call one method the copy constructor.

    Foo::Foo(const string& s) : id(s)
    {
    }

share|improve this answer
    
The initializer concept is interesting, thanks for the suggestion. –  Aaron Sep 9 '10 at 6:22

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