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In C#/VB.NET/.NET, which loop runs faster, for or foreach?

Ever since I read that a for loop works faster than a foreach loop a long time ago I assumed it stood true for all collections, generic collections, all arrays, etc.

I scoured Google and found a few articles, but most of them are inconclusive (read comments on the articles) and open ended.

What would be ideal is to have each scenario listed and the best solution for the same.

For example (just an example of how it should be):

  1. for iterating an array of 1000+ strings - for is better than foreach
  2. for iterating over IList (non generic) strings - foreach is better than for

A few references found on the web for the same:

  1. Original grand old article by Emmanuel Schanzer
  2. CodeProject FOREACH Vs. FOR
  3. Blog - To foreach or not to foreach, that is the question
  4. ASP.NET forum - NET 1.1 C# for vs foreach

[Edit]

Apart from the readability aspect of it, I am really interested in facts and figures. There are applications where the last mile of performance optimization squeezed do matter.

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28  
"my boss will absolutely not let me use for loop and I'm required to always use a foreach" WTF! –  Gregory Pakosz Dec 22 '09 at 15:08
87  
Your boss is an ignorant clown. Plain and simple. Spend a week writing a console app that proves there is not difference in performance, and then quit. –  Josh Stodola Dec 22 '09 at 15:10
20  
In life we often have to do tasks we don't want to do. You come across as a spoiled brat who can't take direction. He's your boss; he has the right to set policy, even policies you personally don't agree with. Learn to deal. –  HLGEM Dec 22 '09 at 15:12
49  
@HLGEM: There's a difference between doing stuff that you don't personally agree with and doing stuff you know to be outright wrong. As professionals it's our job to try to do the right thing. If you don't try to convince the boss of his/her stupidity then you're not being professional. (Obviously if you try and the boss pulls rank then that's their prerogative and you just have to deal with it.) –  LukeH Dec 22 '09 at 15:24
7  
Important Note: This question got merged yesterday with a totally unrelated question about being forced to use foreach instead of for in C#. If you see answers here that make no sense at all, that is why. Blame the moderator, not the hapless answers. –  T.E.D. May 27 '10 at 13:35

36 Answers 36

I found the foreach loop which iterating through a List faster. See my test results below. In the code below I iterate an array of size 100, 10000 and 100000 separately using for and foreach loop to measure the time.

enter image description here

private static void MeasureTime()
    {
        var array = new int[10000];
        var list = array.ToList();
        Console.WriteLine("Array size: {0}", array.Length);

        Console.WriteLine("Array For loop ......");
        var stopWatch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int i = 0; i < array.Length; i++)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(1);
        }
        stopWatch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Time take to run the for loop is {0} millisecond", stopWatch.ElapsedMilliseconds);

        Console.WriteLine(" ");
        Console.WriteLine("Array Foreach loop ......");
        var stopWatch1 = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        foreach (var item in array)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(1);
        }
        stopWatch1.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Time take to run the foreach loop is {0} millisecond", stopWatch1.ElapsedMilliseconds);

        Console.WriteLine(" ");
        Console.WriteLine("List For loop ......");
        var stopWatch2 = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int i = 0; i < list.Count; i++)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(1);
        }
        stopWatch2.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Time take to run the for loop is {0} millisecond", stopWatch2.ElapsedMilliseconds);

        Console.WriteLine(" ");
        Console.WriteLine("List Foreach loop ......");
        var stopWatch3 = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        foreach (var item in list)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(1);
        }
        stopWatch3.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Time take to run the foreach loop is {0} millisecond", stopWatch3.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }

UPDATED

After @jgauffin suggestion I used @johnskeet code and found that the for loop with array is faster than following,

  • Foreach loop with array.
  • For loop with list.
  • Foreach loop with list.

See my test results and code below,

enter image description here

private static void MeasureNewTime()
    {
        var data = new double[Size];
        var rng = new Random();
        for (int i = 0; i < data.Length; i++)
        {
            data[i] = rng.NextDouble();
        }
        Console.WriteLine("Lenght of array: {0}", data.Length);
        Console.WriteLine("No. of iteration: {0}", Iterations);
        Console.WriteLine(" ");
        double correctSum = data.Sum();

        Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int i = 0; i < Iterations; i++)
        {
            double sum = 0;
            for (int j = 0; j < data.Length; j++)
            {
                sum += data[j];
            }
            if (Math.Abs(sum - correctSum) > 0.1)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Summation failed");
                return;
            }
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("For loop with Array: {0}", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);

        sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (var i = 0; i < Iterations; i++)
        {
            double sum = 0;
            foreach (double d in data)
            {
                sum += d;
            }
            if (Math.Abs(sum - correctSum) > 0.1)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Summation failed");
                return;
            }
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Foreach loop with Array: {0}", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
        Console.WriteLine(" ");

        var dataList = data.ToList();
        sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int i = 0; i < Iterations; i++)
        {
            double sum = 0;
            for (int j = 0; j < dataList.Count; j++)
            {
                sum += data[j];
            }
            if (Math.Abs(sum - correctSum) > 0.1)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Summation failed");
                return;
            }
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("For loop with List: {0}", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);

        sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int i = 0; i < Iterations; i++)
        {
            double sum = 0;
            foreach (double d in dataList)
            {
                sum += d;
            }
            if (Math.Abs(sum - correctSum) > 0.1)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Summation failed");
                return;
            }
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Foreach loop with List: {0}", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }
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1  
This is a very poor test. a) you do too few iterations to get a conclusive answer b) That Thread.Sleep will not really wait one millisecond. Use the same method as Jon Skeet did in his answer. –  jgauffin Jun 12 '14 at 5:51

This has the same two answers as most "which is faster" questions:

1) If you don't measure, you don't know.

2) (Because...) It depends.

It depends on how expensive the "MoveNext()" method is, relative to how expensive the "this[int index]" method is, for the type (or types) of IEnumerable that you will be iterating over.

The "foreach" keyword is shorthand for a series of operations - it calls GetEnumerator() once on the IEnumerable, it calls MoveNext() once per iteration, it does some type checking, and so on. The thing most likely to impact performance measurements is the cost of MoveNext() since that gets invoked O(N) times. Maybe it's cheap, but maybe it's not.

The "for" keyword looks more predictable, but inside most "for" loops you'll find something like "collection[index]". This looks like a simple array indexing operation, but it's actually a method call, whose cost depends entirely on the nature of the collection that you're iterating over. Probably it's cheap, but maybe it's not.

If the collection's underlying structure is essentially a linked list, MoveNext is dirt-cheap, but the indexer might have O(N) cost, making the true cost of a "for" loop O(N*N).

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I think for is marginally faster than foreach in most cases, but this is really missing the point. One thing I haven't seen mentioned is that, in the scenario you're talking about (i.e., a high volume web app), the difference in performance between for and foreach is going to have no bearing on the site's performance. You're going to be limited by request/response time and DB time, not for v. foreach.

That said, I don't understand your aversion to foreach. In my opinion, foreach is usually clearer in situation where either could be used. I usually reserve for for situations where I need to traverse a collection in some ugly, non-standard way.

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At least I haven't seen any of my collegues or higher ups saying that, that's just ridiculous considering the fact that there is no significant speed difference between for and foreach. The same applies if he is asking to use it in all cases!

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Starting from .NET Framework 4 you can also use Parallel.For and Parallel.ForEach like described here: C# Multithreading Loop with Parallel.For or Parallel.ForEach

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2  
Note that link-only answers are discouraged, SO answers should be the end-point of a search for a solution (vs. yet another stopover of references, which tend to get stale over time). Please consider adding a stand-alone synopsis here, keeping the link as a reference. –  kleopatra Dec 18 '13 at 9:54

I needed to do parsing of some large data using three nested loops (on List<MyCustomType>). I thought, using Rob Fonseca-Ensor's post above, it'd be interesting to time and compare the difference using for and foreach.

The difference was: The foreach (three foreach nested like foreach{foreach{forech{}}} did the job in 171.441 seconds where as for (for{for{for{}}}) did it in 158.616 seconds.

Now 13 seconds is about 13% reduction in time to do this - which is somewhat significant to me. However, foreach is definitely far more readable than using three indexed-fors...

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