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I am trying to keep track of updates as the each iterates and when the each is finished I would like to show a summary to the user in a graceful way. I have tried almost everything to a method call to update an element on the page but unless I fire off an alert at any point in the event call it will not update.

If anyone knows what I may be missing I would like to see how it is done. Big THANKS in advance!

$('#button-restore-projects').live("click", function() {
                    var countSuccess = 0
                    , countError = 0
                    , element = $("#selectedProjects option")
                    , eachCount = element.length;
                    $("#countReady").html(eachCount);

                    $.each(element, function(i, o) {
                        var id = $(this).val();
                        //alert(i);
                        $.ajax({
                            type: "POST",
                            url: RestoreProject,
                            data: "plan=<%= Model.RtpSummary.RtpYear %>"
                                + "&id=" + id,
                            dataType: "json",
                            success: function(response, textStatus, XMLHttpRequest) {
                                if (response.error == "false") {
                                    //$('').html(response.message);
                                    //$('').addClass('success');
                                    //autoHide(2500);
                                    oProjectListGrid.fnAddData([
                                        "<a href=\"/RtpProject/" + response.data.RtpYear + "/Info/" + response.data.ProjectVersionId + "\">" + response.data.Title + "</a>",
                                        response.data.PlanType,
                                        response.data.COGID,
                                        response.data.TIPId,
                                        response.data.ImprovementType,
                                        response.data.SponsorAgency,
                                        response.data.AmendmentStatus,
                                        response.data.ProjectVersionId]);
                                    countSuccess++;
                                    removeProject(id, false, null);
                                } else {
                                    countError++;
                                    //$('.dialog-result').html(response.message + " Details: " + response.exceptionMessage);
                                    //$('.dialog-result').addClass('error');
                                    //autoHide(10000);
                                }
                                window.onbeforeunload = null;
                            },
                            error: function(response, textStatus, AjaxException) {
                                //alert("error");
                                countError++;
                                //$('').html(response.statusText);
                                //$('').addClass('error');
                                //autoHide(10000);
                            }
                        });
                        //alert(eachCount);
                        //eachCount--;
                        $("#countReady").text(eachCount + ", " + countError + ", " + countSuccess);
                        //alert(eachCount + ", " + countError + ", " + countSuccess);

                        if (eachCount-1 == i) { showRestoreResponse(countError, countSuccess); }
                    });
                    //alert("test");


                    return false;
                });

SOLUTION!!!

First many thanks to all and specifically @SLaks! Second, http://james.padolsey.com/javascript/monitoring-dom-properties/ is credited for a small plugin to monitor an object.

What I did was convert my original variables to an object that was essentially watched. Using the jquery plugin from above I watched the object for a condition: newVal == 0, where newVal is the new value of the eachCount. That watch hit every millisecond waiting for all the server responses to come back to me with error or success. When finished I display a nice little summary report of the actions that happened.

I'm not too sure if this was the best way but it looks good on the screen and my eyes dont hurt too bad looking at it. Below is my solution. Later I will add in the suggestions for keeping an active record update of what is left in the queue. All that code was primarily the debugging that I was adding.

$('#button-restore-projects').live("click", function() {

                var element = $("#selectedProjects option");

                var obj = { eachCount: element.length, countSuccess: 0, countError: 0 };
                //$("#countReady").html(eachCount);

                $.each(element, function(i, o) {
                    var id = $(this).val();
                    //alert(i);
                    $.ajax({
                        type: "POST",
                        url: RestoreProject,
                        data: "plan=<%= Model.RtpSummary.RtpYear %>"
                            + "&id=" + id,
                        dataType: "json",
                        success: function(response, textStatus, XMLHttpRequest) {
                            if (response.error == "false") {
                                //$('').html(response.message);
                                //$('').addClass('success');
                                //autoHide(2500);
                                oProjectListGrid.fnAddData([
                                    "<a href=\"/RtpProject/" + response.data.RtpYear + "/Info/" + response.data.ProjectVersionId + "\">" + response.data.Title + "</a>",
                                    response.data.PlanType,
                                    response.data.COGID,
                                    response.data.TIPId,
                                    response.data.ImprovementType,
                                    response.data.SponsorAgency,
                                    response.data.AmendmentStatus,
                                    response.data.ProjectVersionId]);
                                obj.eachCount--;
                                obj.countSuccess++;
                                removeProject(id, false, null);
                            } else {
                                obj.countError++;
                                //$('.dialog-result').html(response.message + " Details: " + response.exceptionMessage);
                                //$('.dialog-result').addClass('error');
                                //autoHide(10000);
                            }
                            window.onbeforeunload = null;
                        },
                        error: function(response, textStatus, AjaxException) {
                            //alert("error");
                            obj.countError++;
                            //$('').html(response.statusText);
                            //$('').addClass('error');
                            //autoHide(10000);
                        }
                    });
                    //$("#countReady").text(eachCount + ", " + countError + ", " + countSuccess);
                });

                $(obj).watch('eachCount', function(propName, oldVal, newVal) {
                    //alert(newVal);
                    if (newVal == 0) {
                        showRestoreResponse(obj.countError, obj.countSuccess);
                    }
                });

                return false;
            });
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

$.ajax is an asynchronous call which returns immediately.
The success callback is called later, after the server replies.

Therefore, after your each loop, none of the success callbacks have run yet.

share|improve this answer
    
If I step through the code I see it fire and update the database. So you are saying that the success waits till the each function has completed –  Tuck Sep 7 '10 at 13:25
    
Sort of. The success callback is only called after the server replies, which is usually after the each call finishes. –  SLaks Sep 7 '10 at 13:29
    
Moving forward to find a way to watch for the ajax calls to complete. You are right on with a path to the solution. –  Tuck Sep 7 '10 at 14:21
    
@Tuck: In the success callback, you need to check whether all the other callbacks have already run (use a counter), and, if so, set the text. –  SLaks Sep 7 '10 at 14:44

The problem looks like it could lie in

$("#countReady").text(eachCount + ", " + countError + ", " + countSuccess);

This needs to be called when the success and error is called inside the ajax function.


Also this really isn't the best way of doing it. Really you should use a ajax connection with keep-alive and send the data in one POST then periodically have your PHP script send back the latest status in JSON format: { "countSuccess": "5", "countError", "0", "current": "5", "total": "10" } then when current == total you know it's complete, show an information div detailing the results. :)

share|improve this answer
    
That could be. What I am brewing up now is a watch to keep an eye on when the ajax calls complete then fire a method to show the results. The code you are referring to does look like I put it in the wrong place. Thanks. –  Tuck Sep 7 '10 at 14:18
    
Basically you need to put the .text() update function WHEN the data is received i.e in your success() and error() functions. Just create a new function like var showStatus = function() { $("#countReady").text(eachCount + ", " + countError + ", " + countSuccess); } then call showStatus() in your success/error functions. –  Gary Hole Sep 7 '10 at 14:52

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