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This example works but I think that the memory leaks. Function used in the simple web server module and thus shared memory grows if you use this function.

    char *str_replace ( const char *string, const char *substr, const char *replacement ){
      char *tok = NULL;
      char *newstr = NULL;
      char *oldstr = NULL;
      if ( substr == NULL || replacement == NULL ) return strdup (string);
      newstr = strdup (string);
      while ( (tok = strstr ( newstr, substr ))){
        oldstr = newstr;
        newstr = malloc ( strlen ( oldstr ) - strlen ( substr ) + strlen ( replacement ) + 1 );
        memset(newstr,0,strlen ( oldstr ) - strlen ( substr ) + strlen ( replacement ) + 1);
        if ( newstr == NULL ){
          free (oldstr);
          return NULL;
        }
        memcpy ( newstr, oldstr, tok - oldstr );
        memcpy ( newstr + (tok - oldstr), replacement, strlen ( replacement ) );
        memcpy ( newstr + (tok - oldstr) + strlen( replacement ), tok + strlen ( substr ), strlen ( oldstr ) - strlen ( substr ) - ( tok - oldstr ) );
        memset ( newstr + strlen ( oldstr ) - strlen ( substr ) + strlen ( replacement ) , 0, 1 );
        free (oldstr);
      }
      return newstr;
    }

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3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

One problem I can see is that if the replacement string contains the search string, you'll loop forever (until you run out of memory).

For example:

char *result = str_replace("abc", "a", "aa");

Also, doing another malloc/free every time you replace one instance is pretty expensive.

A better approach would be to do exactly 2 passes over the input string:

  • the first pass, count how many instances of the search string are present

  • now that you know how many matches, compute the length of your result & malloc once:

    strlen(string) + matches*(strlen(replacement)-strlen(substr)) + 1

  • make a second pass through the source string, copying/replacing

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Explain this part:

if ( substr == NULL || replacement == NULL ) return strdup (string);

Why do you return a copy of the existing string? This will leak memory, and it's unnecessary.

You also never free the duplicate if the while loop is skipped (i.e. the condition is never met).

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In fairness the existing string is always copied & a new string returned - either when there are replacements (return newstr;) or when there aren't (return strdup(string);). In both cases freeing the original input string (not a great parameter name) cuts down on memory usage, assuming the original script no longer needs it (or alternatively replace the original string in the function and return void). –  Rudu Sep 7 '10 at 14:56
1  
Quite honestly, as a programmer I'd feel kind of duped if I passed a const char * to a function and it frees it up for me :) –  EboMike Sep 7 '10 at 15:18
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  • strdup is not C89/C99, therefore your code => no ANSI C
  • better make the NULL-test direct after malloc

here an example, only with one new memoryblock:

/* precondition: s!=0, old!=0, new!=0 */
char *str_replace(const char *s, const char *old, const char *new)
{
  size_t slen = strlen(s)+1;
  char *cout = malloc(slen), *p=cout;
  if( !p )
    return 0;
  while( *s )
    if( !strncmp(s, old, strlen(old)) )
    {
      p  -= cout;
      cout= realloc(cout, slen += strlen(new)-strlen(old) );
      p  += strlen( strcpy(p=cout+(int)p, new) );
      s  += strlen(old);
    }
    else
     *p++=*s++;

  *p=0;
  return cout;
}
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You might want to cache the value of strlen(old), it might be faster and computing it on each iteration. –  jbernadas Sep 7 '10 at 17:57
1  
The line p += strlen( strcpy(p=cout+(int)p, new) ); causes undefined behavior - assigning twice to "p" without an intervening sequence point. Nicely obfuscated, though. –  David Gelhar Sep 8 '10 at 3:44
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