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Here is my code:

public class Main {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Main p = new Main();
        p.start(args);
    }

    @Autowired
    private MyBean myBean;
    private void start(String[] args) {
        ApplicationContext context = 
            new ClassPathXmlApplicationContext("META-INF/config.xml");
        System.out.println("my beans method: " + myBean.getStr());
    }
}

@Service 
public class MyBean {
    public String getStr() {
        return "string";
    }
}

<beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
 xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
 xmlns:context="http://www.springframework.org/schema/context"
 xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans
     http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans-3.0.xsd
     http://www.springframework.org/schema/context
     http://www.springframework.org/schema/context/spring-context-3.0.xsd"> 
    <context:annotation-config /> 
    <context:component-scan base-package="mypackage"/>
</beans>

Why doesn't this work? I get NullPointerException. Is it possible to use autowiring in a standalone application?

share|improve this question
    
Make some effort to make your question readable. And show us the exception stack trace. –  skaffman Sep 7 '10 at 14:45
    
I maintain an operational example here: tshikatshikaaa.blogspot.com/2012/08/… –  JVerstry Nov 27 '12 at 16:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 45 down vote accepted

Spring works in standalone application. You are using the wrong way to create a spring bean. The correct way to do it like this:

@Component
public class Main {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ApplicationContext context = 
            new ClassPathXmlApplicationContext("META-INF/config.xml");

        Main p = context.getBean(Main.class);
        p.start(args);
    }

    @Autowired
    private MyBean myBean;
    private void start(String[] args) {
        System.out.println("my beans method: " + myBean.getStr());
    }
}

@Service 
public class MyBean {
    public String getStr() {
        return "string";
    }
}

In the first case (the one in the question), you are creating the object by yourself, rather than getting it from the Spring context. So Spring does not get a chance to Autowire the dependencies (which causes the NullPointerException).

In the second case (the one in this answer), you get the bean from the Spring context and hence it is Spring managed and Spring takes care of autowiring.

share|improve this answer
    
Isn't @Autowired an all-in strategy? Either spring manages all the object creation none, but you can't add @Autowired to some fields in your callstack and instantiate them with new ..(). –  Cojones Mar 18 '11 at 17:16
    
If only one single object in your callstack is instantiated with new ..() it won't work right? –  Cojones Mar 18 '11 at 17:23
1  
@Cojones, you can autowire some beans and create others with new, otherwise how would you ever be able to call new ArrayList(), for example? If you have a class with autowired parameters and you instantiate it with new then the autowiring won't take place. –  Paul Jul 30 '11 at 19:24
1  
You might need this in your config.xml also:<context:annotation-config /> <context:component-scan base-package="com.yourcompany.mycomponents" /> –  Mikael Vandmo Apr 9 '13 at 13:30
    
Don't forget the @Component annotation above Main, otherwise you'll get a No qualifying bean of type [..] is defined exception. Took me some time to figure out. –  TinusSky Jun 22 at 11:56

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