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I've got a List<Users> - Users have a Username property.

What I want to know is - is there an better way to get a List<string> of all the Usernames than to simply loop through and build up my new list?

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1  
What do you mean "better way"? You can use LINQ, but this will also loop under the cover. –  Grzenio Sep 7 '10 at 14:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Use LINQ:

List<string> usernames = users.Select(u => u.UserName).ToList();
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Needlessly wasteful compared with ConvertAll as per SLaks' answer unless users has 4 or fewer items. –  Jon Hanna Sep 7 '10 at 16:27

Like this:

List<string> userNames = users.ConvertAll(u => u.UserName);

Note that the userNames list will not reflect subsequent changes to the users or their UserNames.

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If you actually need a List then the LINQ method is about the best you can do (there could be a marginal speed improvement in creating a new List with the appropriate capacity and then adding, but it's unlikely to be appreciable.

Edit: If you are going to do this, use ConvertAll not Select followed by ToList, especially if your list could be large. ConvertAll preallocates to the correct size, the importance of which upon performance grows with the size of the source list.

If you want a read-only IList that acts like you have done this, then you can get much better performance out of a converting list class:

public class ConvertingList<TSrc, TDest> : IList<TDest>
{
  private readonly IList<TSrc> _inner;
  private readonly Func<TSrc, TDest> _conv;
  public ConvertingList(IList<TSrc> inner, Func<TSrc, TDest> conv)
  {
      _inner = inner;
      _conv = conv;
  }
  public TDest this[int index]
  {
      get
      {
          return ReferenceEquals(null, _inner[index]) ? default(TDest) : _conv(_inner[index]);
      }
      set
      {
        throw new NotSupportedException("Readonly collection");
      }
  }
  public int Count
  {
      get
      {
        return _inner.Count;
      }
  }
  public bool IsReadOnly
  {
      get
      {
        return true;
      }
  }
  public int IndexOf(TDest item)
  {
      if(ReferenceEquals(item, null))
      {
        for(int i = 0; i != Count; ++i)
          if(ReferenceEquals(this[i], null))
            return i;
      }
      else
      {
        for(int i = 0; i != Count; ++i)
          if(item.Equals(this[i]))
            return i;
      }
      return -1;
  }
  public void Insert(int index, TDest item)
  {
      throw new NotSupportedException("Readonly collection");
  }
  public void RemoveAt(int index)
  {
      throw new NotSupportedException("Readonly collection");
  }
  public void Add(TDest item)
  {
      throw new NotSupportedException("Readonly collection");
  }
  public void Clear()
  {
      throw new NotSupportedException("Readonly collection");
  }
  public bool Contains(TDest item)
  {
      return IndexOf(item) != -1;
  }
  public void CopyTo(TDest[] array, int arrayIndex)
  {
      if(array == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException();
        if(arrayIndex < 0)
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
        if(array.Rank != 1 || array.Length < arrayIndex + Count)
            throw new ArgumentException();
        foreach(TDest item in this)
          array[arrayIndex++] = item;
  }
  public bool Remove(TDest item)
  {
      throw new NotSupportedException("Readonly collection");
  }
  public IEnumerator<TDest> GetEnumerator()
  {
      foreach(TSrc srcItem in _inner)
        yield return ReferenceEquals(null,srcItem) ? default(TDest) : _conv(srcItem)
  }
  IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
  {
      return GetEnumerator();
  }
}

With this, then:

IList<string> userNames = new ConvertingList<User, string>(users, u => u.Username);

will create a new object in constant time which behaves as a readonly list of the names.

(A safeguard against a null user returns a null string here, other behaviour can of course be supplied).

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The readonly list only delays the execution of your convert function. So if you are going to use the list, which you probably will eventually, the saved time will be needed later on. Worse even: if you wish to loop the list twice, your convert function is executed again and again, thus resulting in a slower list. Saying don't use Select is called micro optimization, people are not going to notice those 10ms extra. Besides, Select is supported by Microsoft, so any optimization in newer framework versions will directly benefit your code as well. –  Arcturus Sep 8 '10 at 7:30
    
@Arcturus, The readonly list is better or worse than ConvertAll depending on usage, which is precisely why I gave both options as my answer. If you needed to maybe get the size and then hit a few indices it would be much better. If you need to loop twice it's worse. If you need to alter, it's completely useless. Saying do use ConvertAll over Select is the sort of micro-optimisation that becomes free once you are in the habit of doing it that way with no downside. –  Jon Hanna Sep 8 '10 at 7:53
    
True enough, but it not ground breaking. So therefor use whatever you find more usable. IEnumerable is just fine in many cases, so that would make the ToList pointless as well when using Select. If you only would use Count and hit a few indexes, its probably better just to retrieve them from the original list btw. Introducing a whole new list, also means supporting it with testcases as well. –  Arcturus Sep 8 '10 at 7:59
    
@Arcturus, just if a plain Select is enough to do the job then it beats everything mentioned here. ConvertAll beats Select followed by List when a list is needed, and ConvertAll and the class above beat each other in different use-cases. Avoiding lambdas entirely through explicit code beats all of them, but that truly is a micro-opt as it requires much more coding. –  Jon Hanna Sep 8 '10 at 8:02
    
True true :)... –  Arcturus Sep 8 '10 at 8:31
var usernames = users.Select(u => u.Username).ToList();
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You do

List<string> userNames = users.ConvertAll(u => u.UserName);
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