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How do you scale an image added in :before or :after in CSS?

For example, I have a page which contains a book cover:

<span class="book">
    <img src="http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41t7xMPK%2B6L.jpg" />
</span>

I want to use CSS to make it look more like a book, rather than just a cover. I can use :before to add a second image to do this, but as all books vary in size, I need to be able to scale this image to fit the book cover.

I have tried

.book:before{
    content:url("/images/book.png");
    position:absolute;
    height:100%;
    width:100%;

}

but this doesn't work in scaling the image.

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3 Answers 3

The generated image is always displayed 1:1. You cannot scale it. When you fix the size of the generated element, that works well. You could check it with the following CSS attributes:

#logo-image:before
{
    display: block;
    content: url(img/logo.png);
    width: 300px;
    height: 100px;
    border: solid 1px red;
    overflow: scroll;   /* alternative: hidden */
}

You can see the red border at the specified size, and the image content is clipped. But if you leave out the overflow:scroll, you will see the image exceeding its element.

(Tested on Firefox 11)

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you can scale it:

transform: scale(0.7);

but it won't work with px or %.

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-webkit-transform: scale(0.7) Worked for me. –  Ecropolis Dec 18 '13 at 18:34
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Try setting a min-height and a max-height for both of them to the same value, It should then scale the images to the correct size while keeping the correct aspect ratio. (And do that with the width, depending on which one you want to scale)

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