Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.


Since enum in C# are on the stack, I was wondering where enum, in Java, where created. On the stack? On the heap? In some mysterious other place?

Enumeration in C# are more primitive than those in Java, this might explain why they are created on the stack...

Where are they? I can't find them!

Thanks

share|improve this question
4  
Enums in C# can be on the stack, but they can be on the heap too. It all depends where they are used (field/parameter/local variable). They are value types though, maybe that's where the confusion comes from? Besides, in .NET it should not matter where the contents of a variable is stored; this is just an implementation detail (and might change in a different implementation of the CLR). –  0xA3 Sep 7 '10 at 16:23
1  
Out of wild curiosity, why do you want to know whether they are on the stack or the heap? –  whaley Sep 7 '10 at 16:26
1  
@whaley Simple curiosity –  ALOToverflow Sep 7 '10 at 16:30
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Enums in Java are also objects: for example, enums can have instance variables/methods/constructors and implement interfaces. All this makes me think they're handled just like other objects by jvm.

share|improve this answer
1  
Which means... They're on the heap. –  romacafe Sep 7 '10 at 18:54
add comment

Since Java enums extend java.lang.Enum, they are created on the heap like all other Java objects.

share|improve this answer
1  
Technically, they do extend Enum. But it's their status as objects (ie: their indirectly extending Object as well) that'd make them reference types. –  cHao Sep 7 '10 at 16:31
    
@0xA3: They extend java.lang.Enum which itself extends java.lang.Object. –  LukeH Sep 7 '10 at 16:33
    
No, 0xA3, I mean what I said. Look at the javadocs link I posted. They extend java.lang.Enum, which in turn extends java.lang.Object. –  duffymo Sep 7 '10 at 16:41
add comment

They are objects, just like any other object, so the enum itself is on the heap. A variable that holds a reference to an enum may be on the stack if it is a function variable, or it may be on the heap inside some other object if it is a member of an object.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Enums are objects in Java, so they are on the heap. However, for each type there is only a fixed number of them. Client code is dealing with references to these enum objects, so doesn't actually create anything on the heap. As ever from a specification point of view: local variable references are on the stack; object field references are on the heap.

share|improve this answer
    
first sentence - "so they are on the stack" - I think you meant to type "so they are on the heap" ;) –  serg10 Sep 7 '10 at 16:56
    
@serg10 Yes. Didn't want that # either. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Sep 7 '10 at 17:36
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.