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hi
this code works fine and my config file changes correctly.

    //Local Variable Declaration
System.Configuration.Configuration oConfig =
    System.Web.Configuration.WebConfigurationManager.OpenWebConfiguration(
    Request.ApplicationPath);

if (oConfig .AppSettings.Settings["CompanyName"] == null)
{
    oConfig AppSettings.Settings.Add("CompanyName", "MyCompanyName");
    oConfig .Save();
}

but when I want to use a property for this purpose Nothing happend in Config File.

// Property Declaration

private System.Configuration.Configuration _oRootConfig;

public System.Configuration.Configuration oRootConfig
{
   get
   {
       return
           System.Web.Configuration.WebConfigurationManager.OpenWebConfiguration(
           Request.ApplicationPath);           

   }
   set { _oRootConfig = value; }
}

if (oRootConfig.AppSettings.Settings["CompanyName"] == null)
{
   oRootConfig.AppSettings.Settings.Add("CompanyName", "MyCompanyName");
   oRootConfig.Save(System.Configuration.ConfigurationSaveMode.Modified, true);
}

now i have two question:
1-why this code doesnot work ,and there is no error.
2-if i want to programn in object oriented manner ,what can i do to fix this property if the problem is related to the property. thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're reopening the config on every get, do this instead:

get
{
    if(this._oRootConfig == null)
        this._oRootConfig = (System.Web.Configuration.WebConfigurationManager.OpenWebConfiguration(Request.ApplicationPath));
    return this._oRootConfig;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yep, I missed that...good point. –  Richard J. Ross III Sep 7 '10 at 17:33
    
hi man you re great ,your solution works fine ,could you explain more,is this a pattern what i was missing exactly?thanks –  siamak Sep 7 '10 at 17:44
    
The problem is that you don't understand what a property actually is. It's simply syntactic sugar, a nicety of the language. All that happens when a property is compiled is the getter gets turned into a function called get<property_name> and the setter gets turned into a function called set<property_name> (i think). Do some googling, but just remember to treat the getter and setter like functions because their code will get run every time they're called. –  MStodd Sep 7 '10 at 18:09
    
@Siamak - Your problem was that oRootConfig's getter, each time it was called, was re-opening the config file. So, each reference to oRootConfig was generating a new instance of the object, and the old one then goes out of scope. Your code was thus creating three different instances of the configuration object; one to check AppSettings, one to add the new AppSetting and another to save the file. Each instantiation "blew away" the prior instance, along with any changes you had made. –  KeithS Sep 7 '10 at 18:09
    
thank u ,todd ,i think that i know about the nature of the property but Keith explanation satisfy me ,thank you every one –  siamak Sep 7 '10 at 18:22

this line of code:

get 
{ 
return  (System.Web.Configuration.WebConfigurationManager.OpenWebConfiguration(Request.ApplicationPath)); 
}

set { _oRootConfig = value; }

you are not setting _oRootConfig in your get. You need this code:

get
{
     _oRootConfig = (System.Web.Configuration.WebConfigurationManager.OpenWebConfiguration(Request.ApplicationPath));
     return _oRootConfig;
}

set
{
     _oRootConfig = value;
}
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