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Using the code below, I want to remove the .log at the end. I seem to be doing everything right according to perlrequick. Where did I mess up?

test.pl

my $file = "ooout.log";
print $file."\n";
my $file =~ s/\.log//g;
print $file."\n";

output

$ perl test.pl
ooout.log

$
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1  
Wow, five replies all saying the same thing in under a minute, is that a record? It looks like elusive won. –  Chas. Owens Sep 7 '10 at 18:38

6 Answers 6

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You're redeclaring my $file -- remove the my prefix to fix this. This would be caught if you started your script with

use strict;
use warnings;

You would have seen:

"my" variable $file masks earlier declaration in same scope at
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2  
+1 for strict & warnings :-) –  sleske Sep 7 '10 at 18:39
1  
So use warnings; does the same thing as running with perl -w? I did not know that. –  jnylen Sep 7 '10 at 19:13
    
@jnylen: yes, but use warnings; is better for a variety of reasons. –  Ether Sep 7 '10 at 19:20
1  
@jnylen: There are subtle differences. See perldoc.perl.org/warnings.html and perldoc.perl.org/perllexwarn.html –  toolic Sep 7 '10 at 20:34

Others have pointed out your problem with my.

I'd like to note that your substitution code does not exactly match your spec. It will delete all occurrences of the string .log from your file name.

If you only want to delete .log at the end of your string, don't use the g modifier, and do use the end-of-string anchor $:

use strict;
use warnings;

my $file = "ooout.logical.log";
print "$file\n";
$file =~ s/\.log$//;
print "$file\n";

__END__

ooout.logical.log
ooout.logical
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1  
thanks for pointing that out, @toolic. –  Lazer Sep 7 '10 at 19:28

Try removing my from the replace-line:

$file =~ s/\.log//g;

It seems like you are reinitializing $file.

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thanks for the quick reply! –  Lazer Sep 7 '10 at 19:03

Remove the second my, then it will work.

my (somewhat simplified) declares a new variable. You are declaring $file twice, so the second my makes perl forget the value in the first one.

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You're saying "my $file" in the third line, so you're defining another variable.

Try:

my $file = "ooout.log";
print $file."\n";
$file =~ s/\.log//g;
print $file."\n";
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The second my.

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