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UPDATED

I used below solutions (loading Image from stream), but get new problem. img object is absolutely correct Image class instance with all field filled with correct values. But calling

img.Save("path/to/new/image.bmp");

on it results in new exception for GDI+ (System.Runtime.InteropServices.ExternalException, in GDI+ interface) - I get error message but is in polish, am not sure how to translate it.

Original question

I have problem with C# .NET Framework 2.0

Basically I'am trying to achieve:

Image img = Image.FromFile("Path/To/Image.bmp");
File.Delete("Path/To/Image.bmp"); // Exception, the file is in use!

It is important for me to keep copy of image in memory when original file was deleted. I though it is somehow odd that .NET still lock file on hard disc despite it is no longer required for any operation (entire image is now in memory, isn't it?)

So I tried this solution:

Image img = new Image(Image.FromFile("Path/To/Image.bmp")); // Make a copy
                    // this should immiedietaly destroy original loaded image
File.Delete("Path/To/Image.bmp"); // Still exception: the file is in use!

I can do:

Image img = null;
using(Image imgTmp = Image.FromFile("Path/To/Image.bmp"))
{
    img = new Bitmap(imgTmp.Width, imgTmp.Height, imgTmp.PixelFormat);
    Graphics gdi = Graphics.FromIage(img);
    gdi.DrawImageUnscaled(imgTmp, 0, 0);
    gdi.Dispose();
    imgTmp.Dispose(); // just to make sure
}
File.Delete("Path/To/Image.bmp"); // Works fine
// So I have img!

But this seems to me almost like using nuke to kill bug... and raises another problem: GDI poorly support Drawing palette-based images onto each other (and palette ones are majority in my collection).

Am I doing something wrong? Is any better way to have Image in memory and original file deleted from hard disk?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

This should do the trick:

  Image img = null;
  using (var stream = File.OpenRead(path)) {
    img = Image.FromStream(stream);
  }
  File.Delete(path);

UPDATE: Don't use the code above!

I've found the related knowledge base article: http://support.microsoft.com/?id=814675

The solution is to really copy the bitmap as outlined in the article. I've coded the two ways that the article mentions (the first one was the one you were doing, the second one is the one in your answer, but without using unsafe):

public static Image CreateNonIndexedImage(string path) { 
  using (var sourceImage = Image.FromFile(path)) { 
    var targetImage = new Bitmap(sourceImage.Width, sourceImage.Height, 
      PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb); 
    using (var canvas = Graphics.FromImage(targetImage)) { 
      canvas.DrawImageUnscaled(sourceImage, 0, 0); 
    } 
    return targetImage; 
  } 
} 

[DllImport("Kernel32.dll", EntryPoint = "CopyMemory")] 
private extern static void CopyMemory(IntPtr dest, IntPtr src, uint length); 

public static Image CreateIndexedImage(string path) { 
  using (var sourceImage = (Bitmap)Image.FromFile(path)) { 
    var targetImage = new Bitmap(sourceImage.Width, sourceImage.Height, 
      sourceImage.PixelFormat); 
    var sourceData = sourceImage.LockBits(
      new Rectangle(0, 0, sourceImage.Width, sourceImage.Height), 
      ImageLockMode.ReadOnly, sourceImage.PixelFormat); 
    var targetData = targetImage.LockBits(
      new Rectangle(0, 0, sourceImage.Width, sourceImage.Height), 
      ImageLockMode.WriteOnly, targetImage.PixelFormat); 
    CopyMemory(targetData.Scan0, sourceData.Scan0, 
      (uint)sourceData.Stride * (uint)sourceData.Height); 
    sourceImage.UnlockBits(sourceData); 
    targetImage.UnlockBits(targetData); 
    targetImage.Palette = sourceImage.Palette;
    return targetImage; 
  } 
} 
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks, it works flawleslly and is faster than my solution :) –  PiotrK Sep 9 '10 at 19:26
1  
WHOW!!! You have my BIG thanks. This works like a charm :) (the solution with DllImport) thx a lot :) –  Jan Macháček Mar 7 '14 at 15:44
    
The image produced by this function does lose its RawFormat (which tells you the format the image was saved as). This can be a problem if you want to save it to a stream, which will give an exception when you pass the stream and the RawFormat of the image. Also, when saving the image, it will always default to png unless specified otherwise. –  user886079 Aug 18 '14 at 20:46
1  
The indexed image code needs fixing: the colour palette isn't copied. Thankfully, colour palettes are actually created by the getter instead of referencing the internal object, so you can just get the palette out of the original image and then give it to the new one. –  Nyerguds Aug 21 '14 at 11:06
1  
Thanks for the info, @Nyeguds. –  Jordão Aug 21 '14 at 11:17

Your problem is that the new Image still knows where it came from, having been given the file handle from the old Image's copy constructor, and so the runtime still knows it has an open handle to the file.

You might be able to work around this behavior with a Stream instead:

Image image;
FileStream myStream = new FileStream(path);

try
{
    image = Image.FromStream(myStream);
}
finally
{    
    myStream.Close();
    myStream.Dispose();
}

//test that you have a valid Image and then go to work.

Here's a cleaner version with a using clause:

Image image;
using(FileStream myStream = new FileStream(path))
{
    image = Image.FromStream(myStream);
}
//a using clause calls Dispose() at the end of the block,
//which will call Close() as well

Caveat emptor; I have not tested this, no guarantee that it'll solve the problem, but this seems reasonable. Working directly with the Stream gives you, and not the image implementation, control over the file handle, so you can make sure your program releases resources when YOU want.

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Thanks! Verified this solution (after minor scope fix for myStream). This is far simpler than the accepted answer and doesn't require manually copying memory. Too bad Msft didn't toss this variation in as a parameter to Image.FromFile() ! –  nothingisnecessary Jul 1 '14 at 22:08
1  
Nope... GDI+ errors keep popping up after the stream is disposed. –  Nyerguds Aug 21 '14 at 11:04

just put

GC.Collect();

at the end it should work fine

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This works fine, the downside is that it requires "unsafe" compilation.

The version when Image is loaded from stream that is killed when loading is done results in unable to save image to disc via classic GDI+

public static unsafe Image LoadImageSafe(string path)
{
    Image ret = null;
    using (Image imgTmp = Image.FromFile(path))
    {
        ret = new Bitmap(imgTmp.Width, imgTmp.Height, imgTmp.PixelFormat);
        if (imgTmp.PixelFormat == PixelFormat.Format8bppIndexed)
        {
            ColorPalette pal = ret.Palette;
            for (int i = 0; i < imgTmp.Palette.Entries.Length; i++)
                pal.Entries[i] = Color.FromArgb(imgTmp.Palette.Entries[i].A,
                    imgTmp.Palette.Entries[i].R, imgTmp.Palette.Entries[i].G,
                    imgTmp.Palette.Entries[i].B);
            ret.Palette = pal;
            BitmapData bmd = ((Bitmap)ret).LockBits(new Rectangle(0, 0,
                imgTmp.Width, imgTmp.Height), ImageLockMode.WriteOnly,
                PixelFormat.Format8bppIndexed);
            BitmapData bmd2 = ((Bitmap)imgTmp).LockBits(new Rectangle(0, 0,
                imgTmp.Width, imgTmp.Height), ImageLockMode.ReadOnly,
                PixelFormat.Format8bppIndexed);

            Byte* pPixel = (Byte*)bmd.Scan0;
            Byte* pPixel2 = (Byte*)bmd2.Scan0;

            for (int Y = 0; Y < imgTmp.Height; Y++)
            {
                for (int X = 0; X < imgTmp.Width; X++)
                {
                    pPixel[X] = pPixel2[X];
                }
                pPixel += bmd.Stride;
                pPixel2 += bmd2.Stride;
            }

            ((Bitmap)ret).UnlockBits(bmd);
            ((Bitmap)imgTmp).UnlockBits(bmd2);
        }
        else
        {
            Graphics gdi = Graphics.FromImage(ret);
            gdi.DrawImageUnscaled(imgTmp, 0, 0);
            gdi.Dispose();
        }
        imgTmp.Dispose(); // just to make sure
    }
    return ret;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I believe using Marshal.Copy(...) actually solves the unsafe thing. It's also probably more efficient than byte-by-byte copying. –  Nyerguds Feb 26 at 9:11

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