Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've come across some odd behavior in assignment of final variables. You can assign a final varible in a constructor to initialize it, which makes sense. However you can't do the same in a subclass, even if the final variable is a member of the subclass -

public class FinalTest {
    public final String name;

    public FinalTest()
    {
        name = "FinalTest";
    }

    public static class FinalTestSubclass extends FinalTest {
        public FinalTestSubclass()
        {
            name = "FinalTestSubclass"; //<---- this won't compile, assignment to final variable.
        }
    }
}

Can someone think of a good reason why this should/would work this way?

share|improve this question
    
Never mind, reassignment in the 2nd constructor, didn't see it. –  Steve B. Sep 7 '10 at 20:18
add comment

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Every constructor of a subclass must invoke a constructor of the superclass as its first operation. Every final member variable must be initialized before a constructor completes. A final variable can be assigned only once. Given those rules, it is impossible for a subclass constructor to directly assign a value to a final superclass' member.

Making exceptions would increase complexity and create "gotchas" in exchange for limited additional utility.

A practical solution is to provide a superclass constructor that takes a value to be assigned to the final member. This can be protected or package-private if desired. If the superclass is outside of your control, there's a good chance that allowing derived classes to break its assumptions about the finality of its members would cause other problems.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you were allowed to assign a value to name in FinalTestSubClass it would mean that the value assigned in FinalTest was not actually the final value.

If your example was valid, then this would mean that name could have different values (based upon which class was instantiated), making the final modifier pretty much redundant.

A better question is, why should the behavior you desire be allowed?

share|improve this answer
1  
In fact, for an instance of FinalTestSubclass, the field would have different values at different times: It would first be assigned "FinalTest" in the super class constructor, and then assigned "FinalTestSubclass" in the subclass constructor. –  meriton Sep 7 '10 at 20:26
    
Addendum: It is perfectly okay for a non-static final field to have different values in different objects. –  meriton Sep 7 '10 at 20:34
add comment

informally, final fields should have been initialized when the constructor is finished.

in your subclass constructor, super() has been called implicitly, the constructor of the super class is finished, the final fields in the super class should not be modified.

you may want this instead:

class A
    final String s;
    A(String s){ this.s = s; }
    A() { this("default"); }

class B extends A
    B(){ super("B's default"); }
share|improve this answer
add comment

This is standard behavior in Java

The key word final can by used in multiple way, for class close the possibility to inherite from it, for method to override it, for variable allow to be assigned only once in simply words.

For your case this variable is allready assigned in super class,

what You can do is

public class FinalTest {
    public final String  name = "FinalTest";

    public FinalTest()
    {

    }

    public static class FinalTestSubclass extends FinalTest {

        public final String  name = "FinalTestSubclass";

        public FinalTestSubclass()
        {

        }
    }
}

Read more about final variables

share|improve this answer
add comment

In reply to your comment to matt's answer; you can achieve determining the constant in the subclass by passing it in the constructor:

public class FinalTest {
    public final String name;

    public FinalTest()
    {
        this("FinalTest");
    }

    protected FinalTest(String nameConstant)
    {
        name = nameConstant;
    }

    public static class FinalTestSubclass extends FinalTest {
        public FinalTestSubclass()
        {
            super("FinalTestSubclass");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.