Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

level: beginner

word= 'even' 
dict2 = {'i': 1, 'n': 1, 'e': 1, 'l': 2, 'v': 2} 

i want to know if word is entirely composed of letters in dict2 my approach:

step 1 : convert word to dictionary(dict1)

step2:

for k in dict1.keys(): 
        if k in dict2: 
               if dict1[k] != dict2[k]: 
                   return False 
               return True 

by adding a print statement i can see that this simply ends too early e.g. as soon as the first IF condition is met the loop exits and i won't get a correct answer. i think this is easy but google and python doc didn't return any good hints so i'm trying here.

Thanks Baba

UPDATE

the number of times that each letter ocurs in the word needs to be smaller or equal to the number of times it apears in dict2. That way i am guaranteed that word is entirely made up of elements of dict2.

for k in word.keys(): # word has ben converted to key already
    if k not in hand:
        return False
    elif k in hand:
      if word[k] > hand[k]:  
          return False
return True
share|improve this question
    
Are the values in dict2 important? For example, does dict2['v']=2 mean that word can contain at most 2 v s? –  unutbu Sep 7 '10 at 20:17
    
the idea is to evaluate if word is entirely made up of letters in dict2. so if word contains 2 e's (e.g.'even') then if dict2[e] = 1 the function shall return False –  raoulbia Sep 7 '10 at 21:54

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You only want to return true after all the checks, so stick it after the loop. Here it is as a straight modification of your code:

for k in dict1.keys(): 
    if k in dict2: 
        if dict1[k] != dict2[k]: 
            return False 
return True 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Zubin and Brian for pointing out the proper use of return functions! That was just the refresher i needed. I have updated my post now with what i bieve is the code i needed to write. –  raoulbia Sep 7 '10 at 21:38
>>> word= 'even'
>>> dict2 = {'i': 1, 'n': 1, 'e': 1, 'l': 2, 'v': 2}
>>> set(word).issubset(set(dict2.keys()))
True
share|improve this answer
    
To explain the above a bit... because you don't need the key->value relationship, a list or set is what you're looking for (not a dict). Since you don't need the order to matter, and explicitly want only one element of each type, a set is more appropriate. .keys() returns a list, so you use the set() constructor to make both the word and the key list into sets. –  jkerian Sep 7 '10 at 20:22

in your code, just move the "return True" to be outside all the loops. That is, only return true if your loops complete without finding a non-matching value. Whether that's truly what you want for your actual code is hard to say, but moving the "return True" fixes the logic error in the code you posted.

share|improve this answer

Unless you need it for something else, don't bother constructing dict1. Just do this:

for c in word:
    if c not in dict2:
        return False
return True

Of course, you could also use a set instead of a dict to hold the letters.

share|improve this answer
>>> word = {'e':2, 'v':1, 'n':1}
>>> hand= {'i': 1, 'n': 1, 'e': 1, 'l': 2, 'v': 2}
>>> all(k in hand and v <= hand[k] for k,v in word.items())
False

and now see the true case

>>> hand['e']+=1
>>> all(k in hand and v <= hand[k] for k,v in word.items())
True
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.