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I am working with a 2D Numpy masked_array in Python. I need to change the data values in the masked area such that they equal the nearest unmasked value.

NB. If there are more than one nearest unmasked values then it can take any of those nearest values (which ever one turns out to be easiest to code…)

e.g.

import numpy
import numpy.ma as ma

a = numpy.arange(100).reshape(10,10)
fill_value=-99
a[2:4,3:8] = fill_value
a[8,8] = fill_value
a = ma.masked_array(a,a==fill_value)

>>> a  [[0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9]
  [10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19]
  [20 21 22 -- -- -- -- -- 28 29]
  [30 31 32 -- -- -- -- -- 38 39]
  [40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49]
  [50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59]
  [60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69]
  [70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79]
  [80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 -- 89]
  [90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99]],
  • I need it to look like this:
>>> a.data
 [[0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9]
 [10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19]
 [20 21 22 ? 14 15 16 ? 28 29]
 [30 31 32 ? 44 45 46 ? 38 39]
 [40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49]
 [50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59]
 [60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69]
 [70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79]
 [80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 ? 89]
 [90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99]],

NB. where "?" could take any of the adjacent unmasked values.

What is the most efficient way to do this?

Thanks for your help.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could use np.roll to make shifted copies of a, then use boolean logic on the masks to identify the spots to be filled in:

import numpy as np
import numpy.ma as ma

a = np.arange(100).reshape(10,10)
fill_value=-99
a[2:4,3:8] = fill_value
a[8,8] = fill_value
a = ma.masked_array(a,a==fill_value)
print(a)

# [[0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9]
#  [10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19]
#  [20 21 22 -- -- -- -- -- 28 29]
#  [30 31 32 -- -- -- -- -- 38 39]
#  [40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49]
#  [50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59]
#  [60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69]
#  [70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79]
#  [80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 -- 89]
#  [90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99]]

for shift in (-1,1):
    for axis in (0,1):        
        a_shifted=np.roll(a,shift=shift,axis=axis)
        idx=~a_shifted.mask * a.mask
        a[idx]=a_shifted[idx]

print(a)

# [[0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9]
#  [10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19]
#  [20 21 22 13 14 15 16 28 28 29]
#  [30 31 32 43 44 45 46 47 38 39]
#  [40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49]
#  [50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59]
#  [60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69]
#  [70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79]
#  [80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 98 89]
#  [90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99]]

If you'd like to use a larger set of nearest neighbors, you could perhaps do something like this:

neighbors=((0,1),(0,-1),(1,0),(-1,0),(1,1),(-1,1),(1,-1),(-1,-1),
           (0,2),(0,-2),(2,0),(-2,0))

Note that the order of the elements in neighbors is important. You probably want to fill in missing values with the nearest neighbor, not just any neighbor. There's probably a smarter way to generate the neighbors sequence, but I'm not seeing it at the moment.

a_copy=a.copy()
for hor_shift,vert_shift in neighbors:
    if not np.any(a.mask): break
    a_shifted=np.roll(a_copy,shift=hor_shift,axis=1)
    a_shifted=np.roll(a_shifted,shift=vert_shift,axis=0)
    idx=~a_shifted.mask*a.mask
    a[idx]=a_shifted[idx]

Note that np.roll happily rolls the lower edge to the top, so a missing value at the top may be filled in by a value from the very bottom. If this is a problem, I'd have to think more about how to fix it. The obvious but not very clever solution would be to use if statements and feed the edges a different sequence of admissible neighbors...

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Great! That works for my purposes. One question -could it be generalized to work for larger data gaps where the nearest unmasked value is more than one point away? –  Pete W Sep 7 '10 at 21:03
    
@Pete - A quick way to do so is to wrap the for loops in a while np.any(a.mask):. @unutbu - Damn slick way of implementing nearest neighbor interpolation, by the way! –  Joe Kington Sep 7 '10 at 21:46
    
Thank you Joe! Compliments from you make me very happy. :) –  unutbu Sep 7 '10 at 21:58
    
Thanks! I've got everything I need now. It works like a charm. –  Pete W Sep 7 '10 at 22:06
    
@unutbu - I'm honestly flattered by that! –  Joe Kington Sep 7 '10 at 22:11

For more complicated cases you could use scipy.spatial:

from scipy.spatial import KDTree
x,y=np.mgrid[0:a.shape[0],0:a.shape[1]]

xygood = np.array((x[~a.mask],y[~a.mask])).T
xybad = np.array((x[a.mask],y[a.mask])).T

a[a.mask] = a[~a.mask][KDTree(xygood).query(xybad)[1]]

print a
  [[0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9]
  [10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19]
  [20 21 22 13 14 15 16 17 28 29]
  [30 31 32 32 44 45 46 38 38 39]
  [40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49]
  [50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59]
  [60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69]
  [70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79]
  [80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 78 89]
  [90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99]]
share|improve this answer
    
Could this same approach be used for extrapolating outside of the convex hull after interpolating some irregularly spaced data using a Nearest Neighbor algorithm? It appears that it could work, but perhaps there are better alternatives. Just wondering, Thanks. –  SSZero Jun 24 '12 at 23:40

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