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This question reminded me of a couple related problems with whole-set comparison. Given:

  1. a collection of sets, and
  2. a probe set

Three questions:

  1. How do you find all sets in collection that match probe, element for element?
  2. How do you find all sets in collection that match a collection of probes, without the use of explicit looping constructs? How do you join sets of sets?
  3. Is this relational division? If not, what is it?

I have a decent solution to question 1 (see below).

I don't have a decent relational solution to question 2. Any takers?

Test data:

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#elements') IS NOT NULL DROP TABLE #elements
IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#sets') IS NOT NULL DROP TABLE #sets

CREATE TABLE #sets (set_no INT, PRIMARY KEY (set_no))
CREATE TABLE #elements (set_no INT, elem CHAR(1), PRIMARY KEY (set_no, elem))

INSERT #elements VALUES (1, 'A')
INSERT #elements VALUES (1, 'B')
INSERT #elements VALUES (1, 'C')
INSERT #elements VALUES (1, 'D')
INSERT #elements VALUES (1, 'E')
INSERT #elements VALUES (1, 'F')
INSERT #elements VALUES (2, 'A')
INSERT #elements VALUES (2, 'B')
INSERT #elements VALUES (2, 'C')
INSERT #elements VALUES (3, 'D')
INSERT #elements VALUES (3, 'E')
INSERT #elements VALUES (3, 'F')
INSERT #elements VALUES (4, 'B')
INSERT #elements VALUES (4, 'C')
INSERT #elements VALUES (4, 'F')
INSERT #elements VALUES (5, 'F')

INSERT #sets SELECT DISTINCT set_no FROM #elements

Setup and solution for question 1, set lookup:

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#probe') IS NOT NULL DROP TABLE #probe
CREATE TABLE #probe (elem CHAR(1) PRIMARY KEY (elem))
INSERT #probe VALUES ('B')
INSERT #probe VALUES ('C')
INSERT #probe VALUES ('F')

-- I think this works.....upvotes for anyone who can demonstrate otherwise
SELECT set_no FROM #sets s
WHERE NOT EXISTS (
  SELECT * FROM #elements i WHERE i.set_no = s.set_no AND NOT EXISTS (
    SELECT * FROM #probe p WHERE p.elem = i.elem))
AND NOT EXISTS (
  SELECT * FROM #probe p WHERE NOT EXISTS (
    SELECT * FROM #elements i WHERE i.set_no = s.set_no AND i.elem = p.elem))

Setup for question 2, no solution:

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#multi_probe') IS NOT NULL DROP TABLE #multi_probe
CREATE TABLE #multi_probe (probe_no INT, elem CHAR(1) PRIMARY KEY (probe_no, elem))
INSERT #multi_probe VALUES (1, 'B')
INSERT #multi_probe VALUES (1, 'C')
INSERT #multi_probe VALUES (1, 'F')
INSERT #multi_probe VALUES (2, 'C')
INSERT #multi_probe VALUES (2, 'F')
INSERT #multi_probe VALUES (3, 'A')
INSERT #multi_probe VALUES (3, 'B')
INSERT #multi_probe VALUES (3, 'C')

-- some magic here.....

-- result set:
-- probe_no | set_no
------------|--------
-- 1        | 4
-- 3        | 2
share|improve this question
    
Give me a bit peter...this will require some thought...... –  Joe Garrett Sep 7 '10 at 22:43
    
@Joe, take as long as you want :) –  Peter Radocchia Sep 7 '10 at 23:06
    
For question (2) do you mean to search for all sets in the collection that match at least one probe set in the probes collection? i.e. for the given setup that would be sets 4 (matches probe 1) and 2 (matches probe 3) –  CyberDude Sep 7 '10 at 23:09
    
@CyberDude: yes, that's right. Probes 1 and 3 would match sets 4 and 2, respectively. –  Peter Radocchia Sep 7 '10 at 23:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

OK, let's solve question 2 step by step:

(1) Inner join sets and probes on their individual elements. This way we'll see how do test sets and probe sets relate (which sets have what elements in common with which probe):

SELECT
    e.set_no AS [test set],
    m.set_no AS [probe set],
    e.elem [common element]
FROM
    @elements e
JOIN
    @multi_probe m ON e.elem = m.elem

Result:

test set    probe set   common element
----------- ----------- --------------
1           3           A
1           1           B
1           3           B
1           1           C
1           2           C
1           3           C
1           1           F
1           2           F
2           3           A
2           1           B
2           3           B
2           1           C
2           2           C
2           3           C
3           1           F
3           2           F
4           1           B
4           3           B
4           1           C
4           2           C
4           3           C
4           1           F
4           2           F
5           1           F
5           2           F

(2) Count how many common elements between each test set and probe set (inner joins mean we already left the "no matches" aside)

SELECT
    e.set_no AS [test set],
    m.set_no AS [probe set],
    COUNT(*) AS [common element count]
FROM
    @elements e
    JOIN
        @multi_probe m ON e.elem = m.elem
GROUP BY
    e.set_no, m.set_no
ORDER BY
    e.set_no, m.set_no

Result:

 test set    probe set   common element count
----------- ----------- --------------------
1           1           3
1           2           2
1           3           3
2           1           2
2           2           1
2           3           3
3           1           1
3           2           1
4           1           3
4           2           2
4           3           2
5           1           1
5           2           1

(3) Bring the counts of the test set and probe set on each row (subqueries may not be the most elegant)

SELECT
    e.set_no AS [test set],
    m.set_no AS [probe set],
    COUNT(*) AS [common element count],
    (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM @elements e1 WHERE e1.set_no = e.set_no) AS [test set count],
    (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM @multi_probe m1 WHERE m1.set_no = m.set_no) AS [probe set count]
FROM
    @elements e
    JOIN @multi_probe m ON e.elem = m.elem
GROUP BY
    e.set_no, m.set_no
ORDER BY
    e.set_no, m.set_no

Result:

test set    probe set   common element count test set count probe set count
----------- ----------- -------------------- -------------- ---------------
1           1           3                    6              3
1           2           2                    6              2
1           3           3                    6              3
2           1           2                    3              3
2           2           1                    3              2
2           3           3                    3              3
3           1           1                    3              3
3           2           1                    3              2
4           1           3                    3              3
4           2           2                    3              2
4           3           2                    3              3
5           1           1                    1              3
5           2           1                    1              2

(4) Find the solution: only retain those test sets and probe sets that have the same number of elements AND this number is also the number of common elements, i.e. the test set and the probe set are identical

SELECT
    e.set_no AS [test set],
    m.set_no AS [probe set]
FROM
    @elements e
JOIN
    @multi_probe m ON e.elem = m.elem
GROUP BY
    e.set_no, m.set_no
HAVING
    COUNT(*) = (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM @elements e1 WHERE e1.set_no = e.set_no)
    AND (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM @elements e1 WHERE e1.set_no = e.set_no) = (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM @multi_probe m1 WHERE m1.set_no = m.set_no)
ORDER BY
    e.set_no, m.set_no

Result:

test set    probe set
----------- -----------
2           3
4           1

Excuse the @s instead of #s, I like table variables better :)

share|improve this answer
1  
yah, re: @, but where are your statistics, hmmm? –  Peter Radocchia Sep 8 '10 at 0:55
    
One big difference is that temp tables use statistics, table variables don't. –  ErikE Sep 8 '10 at 1:46
    
Marked as accepted. I had hoped for a solution that didn't use aggregates. Turns out, my solution to the first question is easily extended to multiple probes. Estimated execution cost of the aggregate version is slightly lower than the non-aggregate one, 0.031 vs 0.038. Don't know how it might scale to larger volumes of data. –  Peter Radocchia Sep 8 '10 at 1:50
    
Why would you prefer table variables? For large datasets temp tables are faster, they can be indexed as well. And when debugging a complex set of queries I find it easier by far to be able to run two or three steps and stop and examine the contents of the temp table and then go on, if it is what was expected rather than recreating the whole thing each time becasue the table varaibles are out of scope. And if the final result isn't what was expected and you haven't yet dropped the temp tables, you can see what went wrong usually. Nice explanation though. –  HLGEM Sep 8 '10 at 19:07
    
I prefer table variables because I don't work with such large datasets and so they are faster than temp tables. Also they dispose themselves and even if they don't have all the capabilities of temp tables I only use them for basic stuff which is enough for me. –  CyberDude Sep 8 '10 at 21:15

May I submit a more "mathematically inclined" solution to question (1), in SQL Server syntax:

SELECT
    s.set_no
FROM
    #sets s
    JOIN @elements e ON s.set_no = e.set_no
    LEFT JOIN #probe p ON e.elem = p.elem
GROUP BY
    s.set_no
HAVING
    COUNT(DISTINCT p.elem) = COUNT(*)
    AND COUNT(*) = (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM #probe)
  • COUNT(*) will always denote the number of elements in each test set (because of the LEFT JOIN)
  • COUNT(DISTINCT p.elem) will denote the number of "matches" between an element in the test set and an element in the probe set (because the NULLs will not be counted), i.e. how many elements in the probe set were also present in the test set

Translated into mathematical terms COUNT(DISTINCT p.elem) = COUNT(*) would express that the test set is a subset of the probe set ( test ⊆ probe ) while COUNT(*) = (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM #probe) would express that the cardinality of the test set is equal to the cardinality of the probe set ( |test| = |probe| ). From these two conditions we conclude that test = probe.

share|improve this answer
    
I like the mathematical framing. If I knew more math, I would translate my own solution to set notation, and show how the two are equivalent (or aren't, as the case may be). –  Peter Radocchia Sep 7 '10 at 23:14
    
Couldn't you change the left join to inner join, remove the count(distinct p.elem), and arrive at the same result? Or at least replace count(distinct elem) with count(elem)? –  Peter Radocchia Sep 7 '10 at 23:14
1  
If you'd use INNER instead of LEFT, the SELECT (after removing the GROUP and HAVING in order to see the actual rows) would only pick up those elements in the sets that match elements in the probe. This would translate only into knowing that those sets have all of the elements in the probe but possibly others more. Adding the COUNT(*) = (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM #probe) condition will then only assure you that the resulting sets are a superset of the probe (e.g. set 1 would also qualify as a match). –  CyberDude Sep 7 '10 at 23:28

[Answering my own question....]

First, the solution. The EXCEPT syntax can handle multiple columns and NULLs gracefully, so this is closer to a general solution:

SELECT 
  s.set_no AS test_set_no
, p.set_no AS probe_set_no
FROM #test_sets s CROSS JOIN #probe_sets p
WHERE NOT EXISTS (
    SELECT elem FROM #test_elements  te WHERE te.set_no = s.set_no EXCEPT 
    SELECT elem FROM #probe_elements pe WHERE pe.set_no = p.set_no)
  AND NOT EXISTS (
    SELECT elem FROM #probe_elements pe WHERE pe.set_no = p.set_no EXCEPT
    SELECT elem FROM #test_elements  te WHERE te.set_no = s.set_no)
ORDER BY 
  test_set_no
, probe_set_no

Next, the revised data set:

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#test_elements') IS NOT NULL DROP TABLE #test_elements
IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#test_sets') IS NOT NULL DROP TABLE #test_sets

CREATE TABLE #test_sets (set_no INT, PRIMARY KEY (set_no))
CREATE TABLE #test_elements (set_no INT, elem CHAR(1), PRIMARY KEY (set_no, elem))

INSERT #test_elements VALUES (1, 'A')
INSERT #test_elements VALUES (1, 'B')
INSERT #test_elements VALUES (1, 'C')
INSERT #test_elements VALUES (1, 'D')
INSERT #test_elements VALUES (1, 'E')
INSERT #test_elements VALUES (1, 'F')
INSERT #test_elements VALUES (2, 'A')
INSERT #test_elements VALUES (2, 'B')
INSERT #test_elements VALUES (2, 'C')
INSERT #test_elements VALUES (3, 'D')
INSERT #test_elements VALUES (3, 'E')
INSERT #test_elements VALUES (3, 'F')
INSERT #test_elements VALUES (4, 'B')
INSERT #test_elements VALUES (4, 'C')
INSERT #test_elements VALUES (4, 'F')
INSERT #test_elements VALUES (5, 'F')

INSERT #test_sets SELECT DISTINCT set_no FROM #test_elements

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#probe_elements') IS NOT NULL DROP TABLE #probe_elements
IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#probe_sets') IS NOT NULL DROP TABLE #probe_sets
CREATE TABLE #probe_sets (set_no INT PRIMARY KEY (set_no))
CREATE TABLE #probe_elements (set_no INT, elem CHAR(1) PRIMARY KEY (set_no, elem))

INSERT #probe_elements VALUES (1, 'B')
INSERT #probe_elements VALUES (1, 'C')
INSERT #probe_elements VALUES (1, 'F')
INSERT #probe_elements VALUES (2, 'C')
INSERT #probe_elements VALUES (2, 'F')
INSERT #probe_elements VALUES (3, 'A')
INSERT #probe_elements VALUES (3, 'B')
INSERT #probe_elements VALUES (3, 'C')

INSERT #probe_sets SELECT DISTINCT set_no FROM #probe_elements

By comparison, using aggregates, as per CyberDude:

SELECT
  e.set_no AS [test set]
, m.set_no AS [probe set]
FROM #test_elements e
JOIN #probe_elements m ON e.elem = m.elem
GROUP BY 
  e.set_no
, m.set_no
HAVING (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM #test_elements  e1 WHERE e1.set_no = e.set_no) 
     = (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM #probe_elements m1 WHERE m1.set_no = m.set_no)
   AND (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM #test_elements  e1 WHERE e1.set_no = e.set_no)
     = COUNT(*) 
ORDER BY
  e.set_no
, m.set_no
share|improve this answer

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