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Im working in C++ and I have a #define VAL 0x00000400. when I set a variable equal to the define: int value = VAL; when I run through the debugger is shows the variable value = 1024. could someone explain how that turns into 1024? Maybe some links to memory address info, #define info, or something relevant.

Thanks

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6  
-1 for very basic question on the diff between base 10 and base 16. –  Steve Townsend Sep 7 '10 at 22:25
    
oh, i can't imagine how peoples using hex without don't know anything about this –  Svisstack Sep 7 '10 at 22:26
8  
@Steve - +1 to counter your unnecessary downvote. SO is a place for questions, even if they are basic. –  Yuval Adam Sep 7 '10 at 22:26
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@Yuwal A: i want to see on SO more professional peoples than c++ tutorial questions –  Svisstack Sep 7 '10 at 22:28
3  
@Svisstack: Just because that's what you want doesn't mean that's what SO is for. SO is meant to be a one-stop-shop for programming questions, not just those deemed "hard" or "interesting." Besides, one programmer's hard or interesting question is another's tutorial question. There's always someone smarter than you. –  John Dibling Sep 7 '10 at 22:31

7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted

0x00000400 is base 16 for 1024. Your debugger is showing you the integer value in base 10.

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"0x400" is hexadecimal, or base 16. 0x400 expressed as decimal (base 10), is 1024.

By the way, you can use google to do base conversions. Search for "0x400 in decimal" and google will give you the answer.

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Upvoted for linking out while the top answer didn't bother to >_< –  Cheezmeister Jun 28 '11 at 2:01

0x00000400 is 400 base 16, which is 1024 base 10.

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1024 in decimal = 400 in hex.

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0x400 is a hexadecimal number (indicated by the 0x prefix.) It is another way of representing the decimal number 1024.

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Additionally, the conversion from 0x400 (base 16) to base 10 is:

4*16^2 + 0*16^1 + 0*16^0
4*16^2 + 0 + 0
4*256
1024
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well, I haven't seen your code, but 400h = 1024 decimal and you specify integer ' int value = VAL ' compiler just does not display any notice/warning, it does the cast for you

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2  
LOL “cast” :-D ... –  Timwi Sep 7 '10 at 23:48
    
I mean, it makes the conversion... implicitly –  john Sep 8 '10 at 10:41
    
?? theres no conversion... –  AK_ Feb 4 '11 at 20:36

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