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I'm having some problems trying to run this program I am working on...The requirements say I was not allowed to use a sort function...I had do something myself....etc.

Pretty much, the program compiles but hangs after executed...I'm guessing it's stuck in an infinite loop...but I can't seem to find it... :(

This program reads to data files that will already be ordered least to greatest and merges them (ordered) into a third .txt file...

The two files are Data1.txt and Data2.txt contains:

Data1.txt

2
2
2
2

Data2.txt

1
3
5
7
9

combine.c

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>


void sortData(FILE *fpData1, FILE *fpData2)
{

 int n, m; 
 FILE *fpMerge;


 fpMerge = fopen("Merge.txt", "w+");


 fscanf(fpData2, "%i", &n);
 fscanf(fpData1, "%i", &m);
 while(n != EOF || m != EOF)
 {

  if(n == EOF)
  {
   fscanf(fpData1, "%i", &m);

   while(m != EOF)
   {

    fprintf(fpMerge, "%i\n", m);
    fscanf(fpData1, "%i", &m);
   }
  }
  if(m == EOF)
  {
   fscanf(fpData2, "%i", &n);

   while(n != EOF)
   {

    fprintf(fpMerge, "%i\n", n);
    fscanf(fpData2, "%i", &n);
   }

  }

  if(n < m)
  {
   fprintf(fpMerge, "%i\n", n);
   fscanf(fpData2, "%i", &n);
  }
  if(n > m)
  {
   fprintf(fpMerge, "%i\n", m);
   fscanf(fpData1, "%i", &m);
  }
  if(n == m)
  {
   fprintf(fpMerge, "%i\n", n); 
   fprintf(fpMerge, "%i\n", m);
   fscanf(fpData2, "%i", &n);
   fscanf(fpData1, "%i", &m);

  }
 }

 fclose(fpMerge);
}

int main (void)
{
 FILE *fpData1;
 FILE *fpData2;


 fpData1 = fopen("Data1.txt", "r");
 if(fpData1 == NULL)
 {
  printf("There was an error opening the file...program terminating..\n");
  exit(1);
 }

 fpData2 = fopen("Data2.txt", "r");
 if(fpData2 == NULL)
 {
  printf("There was an error opening the file...program terminating..\n");
  exit(1);
 }



 sortData(fpData1, fpData2);


 fclose(fpData1);
 fclose(fpData2); 

 return 0;
}
share|improve this question
2  
"...I'm guessing it's..." Have you attached a debugger to see what your program is doing? Have you tried adding some well-placed debug output statements (using printf) to see where it is going wrong? – James McNellis Sep 8 '10 at 5:43
    
I added some printf's and it seems the program is not moving in the file... it stays at the first number and goes forever... is there a better way to move the pointer...cause i'm really not sure...I did it with fscanf earlier i'm not seeing what I did wrong.. – Bri Sep 8 '10 at 6:07

You don't want to compare n != EOF, but rather the return value of fscanf:

int count_1;
count_1 = fscanf(fpData1, "%i", &m);
if (count_1 == EOF) // EOF (or error)
{
  // ...
}

fscanf will also return EOF on error. If you need to tell EOF and error conditions apart, use ferror(fpData1), say, and then look up the error code (stored in errno).

share|improve this answer
    
could i use (!feof(filename)) then? I was using that to begin with...but I tried changing it to != EOF to see if it made a difference... and it didn't.. – Bri Sep 8 '10 at 5:59
    
My manual pages say nothing about fscanf() setting the stream eof flag (the one feof() tests). Why not grab the return value and test if it is EOF? – Jack Kelly Sep 8 '10 at 6:10
    
I figured out my problem.. I hate my loops kind of messed up checking for the wrong EOF. Thanks anyway :) – Bri Sep 8 '10 at 6:31

Your testing of EOF is not quite correct

void sortData(FILE *fpData1, FILE *fpData2)
{
    int data1;
    int data2; 
    FILE *fpMerge;

    fpMerge = fopen("Merge.txt", "w+");
    fscanf(fpData1, "%i", &data1);
    fscanf(fpData2, "%i", &data2);

    // While one file still has data        
    while(!feof(fpData1) && !feof(fpData2))
    {
        // Choose 1 file to test
        // Read from that file and put into merge file until either we
        // run out of data or the condition fails.
        if(data1 < data2)
        {
            do {fprintf(fpMerge, "%i\n", data1);}
            while ((fscanf(fpData1, "%i", &data1) != 0) && (data1 <= data2));
        }
        else
        {
            do {fprintf(fpMerge, "%i\n", data2);}
            while ((fscanf(fpData2, "%i", &data2) != 0) && (data2 <= data1));
        }
        // NOTE: if fscanf() returns 0 it has failed to read (EOF)
    }
    // One of the files has reached the EOF
    // Dump the other file.
    while(fscanf(fpData1, "%i", &data1) != 0) {fprintf(fpMerge, "%i\n", data1);}
    while(fscanf(fpData2, "%i", &data2) != 0) {fprintf(fpMerge, "%i\n", data2);}
}
share|improve this answer

EOF is not a character.
EOF is not an integer.
No files will ever have EOF (neither char nor int) in them.

EOF is a condition.
Files will either be on that condition or (usually) not.

You should check the return value of fscanf() to detect EOF or other problems.

share|improve this answer
1  
EOF is an integer (or at least convertible to one): it's returned by int fscanf(FILE *stream, const char *format, ...). My copy of stdio.h (from eglibc, I think) #define s EOF as -1. A better statement would be: "If you fscanf() into a variable and check that against EOF, you're not doing what you think you're doing. You're comparing the value read from the file against whatever your version of stdio.h uses to indicate EOF, which is almost certainly not what you want." – Jack Kelly Sep 10 '10 at 0:04
    
Yes, my text was a bit too strong. Thanks for the correction. – pmg Sep 10 '10 at 6:37
    
Yeah... EOF is an integer, and char unsigned values are a subset of int disjoint with the only condition value used in these f* stdio functions, EOF. – Matt Joiner Sep 12 '10 at 8:05

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