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For example, I want to write overload functions for set_difference which compares the type std::set<point>

class myIter : public std::iterator<std::input_iterator_tag, int> {
public:
    myIter(int n) : num(n){}
    myIter(const myIter & n) : num(n.num){}
    int & operator *(){return num;}
    myIter & operator ++(){++num; return *this;}
    bool operator !=(const myIter & n){return n.num != num;}
private:
    int num;
};

struct point
{
  point(int X, int Y):x(X), y(Y){}
  int x;
  int y;
}

int main()
{
   set <point> myset;
   myset.insert(point(1, 1);
   myset.insert(point(3, 2);
   myset.insert(point(5, 3);

  //find the missing elements in set for `point.x` using `set_difference`

   std::set<int> missing;

   std::set_difference(myIter(myset.begin()->x+1), myIter(myset.rbegin()->x),
   myset.begin(), myset.end(), std::insert_iterator<std::set<int>>(missing, missing.begin()));

}

After applying the std::set_difference on point.x variables the set<int> missing must be:

missing[0] {2}
missing[1] {4}

How do i know how to write the overload operators for the operation?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Firstly, std::set<point> requires that point is less-than-comparable. You can either define operator< for point, or provide a separate function object that does the comparison as the second template parameter std::set<point,MyCompare>.

Once you actually have your elements in the set, you can use set_difference. It's worth noting that set_difference doesn't actually require you to use std::set for your input --- you could just use a vector and thus avoid having to provide the comparison function.

To use set_difference, you will need to ensure that the value_types of the two iterator ranges are the same, so you'll need another iterator wrapper that returns just the x portion of the point values for the second range.

std::set_difference(myIter(myset.begin()->x+1), myIter(myset.rbegin()->x),
    extractXIter(myset.begin()), extractXIter(myset.end()),
    std::insert_iterator<std::set<int>>(missing, missing.begin()));
share|improve this answer

(My second attempt at the answer.)

This is rather an elaboration of Anthony Williams's answer.

Both iterators that you need are available in the Boost libraries (your own myIter is lacking functionality which may make your code uncompilable with other compilers).

#include <set>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <boost/iterator/counting_iterator.hpp>
#include <boost/iterator/transform_iterator.hpp>
#include <boost/mem_fn.hpp>

struct point
{
  point(int X, int Y):x(X), y(Y){}
  int x;
  int y;
};

bool operator< (const point& a, const point& b)
{
    return a.x < b.x || (a.x == b.x && a.y < b.y);
}

int main()
{
   std::set <point> myset;
   myset.insert(point(1, 1));
   myset.insert(point(3, 2));
   myset.insert(point(5, 3));

  //find the missing elements in set for `point.x` using `set_difference`
   std::set<int> missing;
   using namespace boost;
   std::set_difference(
    counting_iterator<int>(myset.begin()->x+1), counting_iterator<int>(myset.rbegin()->x),
    make_transform_iterator( myset.begin(), mem_fn(&point::x)),
    make_transform_iterator( myset.end(), mem_fn(&point::x)),
    std::inserter(missing, missing.begin()));
   std::copy(missing.begin(), missing.end(), std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, " "));
}

Points of interest:

  • point needs to be "less-than" comparable, if you want to store them in a set
  • boost::counting_iterator is a better myIter
  • boost::transform_iterator allows you to apply a function to the value when dereferenced. In combination with boost::mem_fn it obtains the Point::x member when the iterator is dereferenced.
  • use the helper function std::inserter to get the template arguments deduced
  • the results don't have to be stored in a set (neither does the input have to come from a set, as long as the range is sorted with respect to the used predicate - here comparing the x member.
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IIUC, you are after implementing operator<() for your type, because it is used by several types and algorithms of the standard library:

struct point
{
  point(int X, int Y):x(X), y(Y){}
  int x;
  int y;
};

inline bool operator<(const point& lhs, const point& rhs)
{
  if( lhs.x < rhs.x ) return true;
  if( lhs.x > rhs.x ) return false;
  return lhs.y < rhs.y;
}

That's a quite naive way of judging which point is "smaller". You might want to improve on the algorithm, but the syntactical mechanics stay the same.


Note that, once you have defined p1 < p2, users of your type usually expect p1 > p2 (and p1 <= p2 etc.) to work as well. Since this is trivial, it doesn't hurt to provide the rest of the comparison operators:

inline bool operator> (const point& lhs, const point& rhs) {return rhs < lhs;}
inline bool operator<=(const point& lhs, const point& rhs) {return !(lhs > rhs);}
inline bool operator>=(const point& lhs, const point& rhs) {return !(lhs < rhs);}
inline bool operator==(const point& lhs, const point& rhs)
{
  return lhs.x < rhs.x && lhs.y == rhs.y;
}
inline bool operator!=(const point& lhs, const point& rhs) {return !(lhs==rhs);}
share|improve this answer
    
Note the use of Boost.Operators to seamlessly define those "completary operators" automatically :) –  Matthieu M. Sep 8 '10 at 7:35
    
@Matthieu: I have been counting on you to appear and suggest that. :) (I haven't had the chance to do much C++ in a year now, so I never got around trying this out, and I'm uncomfortable with suggesting something I haven't done myself and don't know how to do. So feel free to keep pointing it out whenever I write them all by hand.) –  sbi Sep 8 '10 at 7:38
    
my pleasure :) it's more syntactic sugar to avoid writing boilerplate code than anything "functional", but it helps keeping the code tidy. –  Matthieu M. Sep 8 '10 at 8:10

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